Program Schedule

View session wise speaker sessions below. Click on the respective day to view sessions on that particular day.

Note: The shedule of speakers and their order of talks are subject to changes.

Keynote Speaker

1
Terry J. Hendricks

NASA - Jet Propulsion Laboratory / California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA 91109

Title of Talk: On Transitioning Spacecraft Power System Technology to Terrestrial Power Systems for 2020 and Beyond

Terry J. Hendricks

NASA - Jet Propulsion Laboratory / California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA 91109

Title of Talk:
On Transitioning Spacecraft Power System Technology to Terrestrial Power Systems for 2020 and Beyond

Abstract:
Spacecraft power technologies surround our daily lives. Piezoelectrics in our shoes; thermoelectrics (TE) in the ground, industry, automobiles, and spacecraft; concentrated solar photovoltaics and solar thermal systems to power our homes and industries are prevalent as never before. Thermoelectric technologies have key benefits and strengths in many terrestrial and military waste energy recovery applications, such as potential modularity, high reliability, and solid state performance requiring little or no operational maintenance. This presentation and discussion will examine current and potential future use of thermoelectric technology and systems based on nano-scale material advancements for proposed NASA deep-space missions to Europa, Titan, and Enceladus and beyond; proposed NASA planetary missions to Mars, Saturn, Venus, and Jupiter; and transitioning to Earth-based applications in automotive, industrial, and aircraft. Different mission concepts have widely varying thermal environments; with temperatures ranging from >873 K in radioisotope-driven systems (with temperatures similar to industrial processing systems) to <100 K in deep-space environments. This discussion will explore the impacts of these different environments on design requirements and performance of potential radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) power technologies. New TE materials are being developed at smaller length-scales and with new nano-composite materials (including Ni/La3Te4, Ca9Zn4.6Sb9, and NiSb2Sn) to support next-generation energy harvesting and next-generation RTG power system opportunities. The latest advanced and demonstrated TE materials (skutterudites, La3-xTe4, Zintls) will be discussed to show new trends, requirements, and remaining challenges. Recent work at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is developing high-efficiency, high-power-flux thermoelectric (TE) modules using skutterudite materials in high-specific-power thermoelectric generators (TEG) critical for terrestrial waste heat recovery (WHR) applications. New skutterudite-based TE modules with small cross-sectional footprints (i.e., area) and high packing factor have demonstrated high power levels and module-level power fluxes greater than 2 W/cm2. The modules have demonstrated their high power output (>10 W) at working temperature differentials of approximately Th = 440°C to Tc = 0°C. These new modules use the newest skutterudite TE materials that have demonstrated long-term exposure capability at high temperatures for thousands of hours with very little TE property degradation. This demonstrates how NASA-driven technology development is flowing down to a wide-spectrum of Earth-based power system applications, such as thermoelectric-driven energy recovery systems.

Biography:
Dr. Hendricks is currently a Technical Group Supervisor, Project Manager, and ASME Fellow in the Power and Sensor Systems Section at NASA–Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)/California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, responsible for managing power system projects; and designing spacecraft power systems, solar power systems, nanotechnology in thermal management and thermal energy storage systems critical to NASA missions. Dr. Hendricks received his Ph.D. and Master of Science in Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin and Bachelor of Science in Physics from the University of Massachusetts at Lowell. He has over 35 years of professional experience in thermal & fluid systems, nanotechnology in energy recovery, conversion and storage systems, terrestrial and spacecraft power systems, and project management. Dr. Hendricks has authored or co-authored more than 85 publications, 2 invited book chapters, holds 9 patents, and is a registered Professional Engineer in California and Texas.

Keynote Speaker

2
Alexander Bagaturyants

Photochemistry Center RAS Federal State Institution "Federal research center Crystallography and Photonics Russian Academy of Science" (FRC Crystallography and Photonics RAS), Russia

Title of Talk: Theoretical Modeling in Organic Nanophotonics

Alexander Bagaturyants

Photochemistry Center RAS Federal State Institution "Federal research center Crystallography and Photonics Russian Academy of Science" (FRC Crystallography and Photonics RAS), Russia

Title of Talk:
Theoretical Modeling in Organic Nanophotonics

Abstract:
Functional organic materials are widely used in photonics applications such as light-emitting devices (OLEDs), photovoltaic devices (solar cells), and optical chemical sensors. The development of new promising materials with good charge-transport characteristics, good energy-transfer properties, good emission properties, and high thermal and photo stability is a very important problem. Theoretical prediction of these properties and characteristics makes it possible to select materials with the best properties. In our work multiscale atomistic simulation methods are applied to studying excited molecules in organic materials and their interaction with neighboring molecules. Such interactions can lead to the formation of excimers and/or exciplexes. The formation of exciplexes at the interface between layers of organic molecules in multilayer structures, typical for organic light-emitting diodes and for other devices of organic electronics and photonics, makes an important contribution to their emission spectrum. Studying such interactions and resulting complexes is of great interest for photonics of organic materials. The application of theoretical methods of atomistic simulation to the prediction of properties of molecules in excited states is especially justified, because a direct experimental investigation of properties of molecules in excited states poses great difficulties. Our work is concentrated on the development of adequate models of a complex system containing excited components, the selection of most reliable methods and approaches for the calculation of such molecular systems taking into account the near and long-range environment, and the development of suitable methods for the description of charge and/or excitation transfer. These following steps are briefly discussed: (1) the construction and use of the library of parameters of the EFP (Effective Fragment Potentials) approximation for the simulation of environment of luminescent dopants and transport molecules in the layers; (2) the estimation of the accuracy of the obtained results; (3) the creation of a program complex for the construction of the polarized environment using the library of parameters in the EFP approximation; (4) the investigation of the effect of the polarized environment on the positions of triplet and singlet levels of luminescent dopants; (5) the development and improvement of approaches to the calculation and interpretation of absorption spectra of supramolecular systems using hybrid QM/MM methods; (6) studying the formation of exciplexes forming at the interface between two organic semiconducting layers by molecular dynamics and the calculation of their properties by quantum chemical methods; (7) selection and development of force fields for metal-organic complexes, molecular dynamics simulation of such system using these force fields; (8) the development and improvement of the computational approach based on multiconfigurational quantum-chemical calculations of radiative and intersystem crossing constants; (9) studying spin-mixed states of phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes, the calculation of radiative phosphorescence constants, and analysis of channels of nonradiative phosphorescence quenching.

Biography:
Alexander Bagaturyants is chief researcher at Photochemistry Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences. He was graduated from D.I. Mendeleev Institute of Chemical Technology, Moscow, Russia in 1962, obtained his PhD degree, Dr. Sci. degree, and the academic title of professor in 1968, 1987, and 1992, respectively, all in physical chemistry. His main research interests are in the field of atomistic multiscale simulations of organic functional materials, quantum chemistry, quantum-chemical calculations of excited states in molecules and molecular complexes. Alexander Bagaturyants is the author of more than 200 research papers and two monographs.

Keynote Speaker

3
Jose A. De Toro SANCHEZ

Instituto Regional de Investigación Científica Aplicada (IRICA) and Departamento de Física Aplicada Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Spain

Title of Talk: Dense assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles: characterization and applications

Jose A. De Toro SANCHEZ

Instituto Regional de Investigación Científica Aplicada (IRICA) and Departamento de Física Aplicada Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Spain

Title of Talk:
Dense assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles: characterization and applications

Abstract:
Magnetic nanoparticles attract great interest due to their ever-increasing range of applications, including data storage, permanent magnets, catalysis, microwave absorption and optics, and more recently, a variety of uses in biomedicine, both for diagnosis (MRI contrast, magnetic particle imaging) and therapy (magnetic hyperthermia and drug delivery), i.e. in theranostics [1]. In order to reach high efficiencies, most of the above applications necessarily rely on relative dense ensembles of magnetic nanoparticles, where (at least) dipolar interactions, and the corresponding demagnetizing field, become inevitably important. However, the effects of such interparticle (or intergrain) interactions are not yet fully understood, as they sometimes lead to complex collective behavior driven by magnetic frustration. In fact, there is a lack of robust analysis methods to even quantify the strength of interparticle interactions. A review of such methods is presented, highlighting our recent findings on arguably the most popular of them, namely the Henkel plots, which have been consistently shown by experiment and Monte Carlo simulations to be sensitive not only to interparticle interactions, as customarily assumed, but also to the subtle surface disorder frequently exhibited by oxide nanoparticles (ubiquitous in the mentioned applications).

Biography:
Jose A. De Toro obtained his Physics M.S. at U. Autónoma de Madrid (1997) and his Ph.D. (2002) at Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, where he is currently an associate professor. He was a postdoc Marie Curie fellow at the University of Liverpool (2004) and visiting professor at the University of Cagliari (2016). His main research line focuses on magnetic nanoparticles, with studies on topics such as the collective behavior of dense assemblies or exchange-bias effects in core-shell structured bi-magnetic particles. He has been invited to speak in APS and ICFPM conferences, among others. He is the chairman of a symposium on the substitution of critical raw materials in the coming E-MRS Spring Meeting (2018).

Sessions:

Nanomaterials
Wiqar Hussain Shah
Wiqar Hussain Shah

International Islamic University, H-10, Islamabad, Pakistan

Title of Talk: Designing and Fabrication of efficient nano-materials for thermoelectric generator

Wiqar Hussain Shah

International Islamic University, H-10, Islamabad, Pakistan

Title of Talk:
Designing and Fabrication of efficient nano-materials for thermoelectric generator

Abstract:
The electrical and thermal properties of the doped Tellurium Telluride (Tl10Te6) chalcogenide nano-particlesare mainly characterized by a competition between metallic (hole doped concentration) and semi-conducting state. We have studied the effects of Sndoping on the electrical and thermoelectric properties of Tl10-xSnxTe6 (1.00 ≤x≤ 2.00), nano-particles, prepared by solid state reactions in sealed silica tubes and ball milling method. Structurally, all these compounds were found to be phase pure as confirmed by the x-rays diffractometery (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. Additionally crystal structure data were used to model the data and support the findings. The particles size was calculated from the XRD data by Scherrer’s formula. The EDS was used for an elemental analysis of the sample and declares the percentage of elements present in the system. The thermo-power or Seebeck co-efficient (S) was measured for all these compounds which show that S increases with increasing temperature from 295to 550 K. The Seebeck coefficient is positive for the whole temperature range, showing p-type semiconductor characteristics. The electrical conductivity was investigated by four probe resistivity techniquesrevealed that the electrical conductivity decreases with increasing temperature, and also simultaneously with increasing Snconcentration. While for Seebeck coefficient the trend is opposite which is increases with increasing temperature. These increasing behavior of Seebeck coefficient leads to high power factor which are increases with increasing temperature and Sn concentration except For Tl8Sn2Te6 because of lowest electrical conductivity but its power factor increases well with increasing temperature.

Biography:

Muraille
Muraille

Université de Toulouse, France

Title of Talk: Nanocrystals as high temperature probes

Muraille

Université de Toulouse, France

Title of Talk:
Nanocrystals as high temperature probes

Abstract:
The study of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) is a very active research field, due to the wide range of applications, related to light-emission and absorption, photodetection, solar cells, light emitting diode or tunable emitters for bio-labeling1. One area is the development of detection techniques with high spatial resolution enabled by the small size of nanomaterials. As a representative example, nanometer probes of temperature can be very useful to obtain an accurate local value of temperature, particularly in catalysis where the activity and selectivity are temperature dependent. The key is to obtain the value of the local temperature inside the solution or inside the solid at the surface of the reactants. Certain catalytic reactions require high temperatures to occur so another challenge is to build a high local temperature probe (> 373 K). In this context, semiconductor NCs are promising objects to provide this precision due to the temperature dependence of their optical properties. We present here the synthesis of different types of NCs (Cd3P22, InP@ZnS3 and CdSe@CdS4), their capacities as nanothermometers for high temperatures (>340 K) and the conditions which have to be fullfilled for accurate measurements. Different parameters such as the wavelength, the intensity, the area and the full width at half maximum of emission were studied as a function of temperature. The studied temperatures ranges from room temperature to 540 K and the comparison between the different NCs is discussed.

Biography:
I have completed my PhD in University of Reims in 2014. My PhD project focused on the evaluation of the efficiency of biocompatible nanoparticles for photodynamic therapy (PDT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications. The nanoparticles were loaded with ruthenium complexes for PDT and gadolinium complexes for IRM separately and then together. I join the group of F. Delpech in LPCNO in Toulouse in 2015 as teacher and researcher and I am actually still working with this team as post-doctorant. The team developpes the synthesis of NCs in order to obtain novel optical properties for different applications.

wisam j. khudhayer
wisam j. khudhayer

University of Babylon, Babylon 51002, IRAQ

Title of Talk: Fabrication of Glancing Angle Deposited Metallic Nanorods on flat and Patterned Substrates

wisam j. khudhayer

University of Babylon, Babylon 51002, IRAQ

Title of Talk:
Fabrication of Glancing Angle Deposited Metallic Nanorods on flat and Patterned Substrates

Abstract:
Glancing angle deposited nanorods have attracted a great attention in many applications such as heat transfer, renewable energy, communication, electronic and electrical field, material science and engineering due to their unique properties. These nanorods are grown randomly with different morphologies and uncontrolled lengths and separation among the nanorods on flat substrates due to the shadowing effect occurs during the glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique. Further enhancement of the performance of the GLAD nanorods is expected by controlling the morphology and separation among the nanorods by surface patterning. Hence, the goal of this work is to investigate the effect of surface pattering on the morphology and separation among the GLAD nanorods. To reach our goal, a combination of modified-nanosphere lithography (m-NSL) technique and GLAD technique is proposed to fabricate periodic and well-separated nanorods. For demonstration, Molybdenum (Mo), Chromium (Cr), and Copper (Cu) were used as source (target) materials due to their low cost and their availability in the laboratory. The results shows that the periodic Mo, Cr, and Cu nanorods has better separation among the nanorods than those grown on flat substrates, while they are larger in diameter and shorter in length. The periodic GLAD nanorods are also exhibited amazing structure that is flower-like or honeycomb-like structure since they are replicating the underlying patterned substrates.

Biography:
Wisam J. Khudhayer obtained his PhD degree from University of Arkansas at Little Rock (USA) in 2011. He is currently assistant professor in the department of energy engineering at university of Babylon (IRAQ) and serving as assistant dean for scientific affairs in the college of engineering / Al-Musayab. Wisam is also a board member of directors of the state company for automobile industry / Alexandria (IRAQ). Six months research work at Washington University in St. Louis (USA) (2006) and three months Graduate Assistant (GA) in Graduate Institute Technology (GIT) at University of Arkansas (2011). His research work focused on the application of nanomaterials in heat transfer, renewable energy (fuel cells), and material science and engineering fields. He published about 28 papers in reputed journals, participated in more than 20 international conferences, supervised three M. Sc students, and his h-index is 7 based on thomson routers and scopus databases. Wisam obtained many national and international awards such as 1st Place Award of Talented Iraqi Student Competition in the field of chemical engineering 2002, "Marquis Who's Who in the America' among Students in American Universities and Colleges in recognition of outstanding merit and accomplishment as a student at University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR) 2011, Nominated for Future Energy Leaders’ programme (FEL-100) 2016, and Nominated and elected for Marquis Who is Who in the World 2018.

Belfennache Djamel Eddine
Belfennache Djamel Eddine

Research Center in Industrial Technologies CRTI Cheraga, Algeria

Title of Talk: Synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles supported on two different metal oxides prepared by impregnation with ionic exchange to form ferromagnetic nanostructures.

Belfennache Djamel Eddine

Research Center in Industrial Technologies CRTI Cheraga, Algeria

Title of Talk:
Synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles supported on two different metal oxides prepared by impregnation with ionic exchange to form ferromagnetic nanostructures.

Abstract:
Nano-sized materials have particularly attracted attention due to their thermal, electrical, magnetic and optical properties that differ substantially from those of the corresponding solid material. In This work, we study gold nanoparticles supported on titanium oxide and cerium oxide, prepared by impregnation with ionic exchange. In the first stage, the conditions of fixing of the gold precursor on the metal oxides supports are optimized. In the second stage, the samples are calcined at various temperatures (T=250, 350, 500 °C). Several experimental techniques are used for the characterization of the samples at the various stages of their elaboration (MEB, DRX, FTIR).A change of morphology of the metal oxides supports grains was observed by Scanning Electron Microscope. The X-rays diffraction made it possible to evidence the formations of nanoparticles of gold sized 3 nm in the case of catalysts Au/TiO2 calcined at 250°C, and the formation of nanoparticles Au51Ce14 of near size 7 nm in the case of Au/CeO2 calcined at 250°C. At superior temperature,its size increases following the phenomenon of coalescence. The spectrometry FTIR allowed to observe peaks of vibration of links Ti-O, Ti-OH, Ti-O-Ti, Ce-O, and Au-O.

Biography:
Djamel Eddine Belfennache researcher at the advanced technology research centre , PhD in semiconductors at Mohamed sedike ben yahia Jijel University . He has published 1 paper in IEEE journal.

Yusuf Mohammad
Yusuf Mohammad

Pusan National University, Republic of Korea

Title of Talk: Shape Controllable Synthesis of Pt–Fe3O4–MnOx Nanoparticles and Electrocatalytic Activity on Oxygen Reduction Reaction

Yusuf Mohammad

Pusan National University, Republic of Korea

Title of Talk:
Shape Controllable Synthesis of Pt–Fe3O4–MnOx Nanoparticles and Electrocatalytic Activity on Oxygen Reduction Reaction

Abstract:
Integrating multiple functionalities into a single nanoparticle (NP) is an important strategy to design hybrid materials for advanced applications. Recently, there has been a growing interest in the synthesis of heterodimeric metal–metal oxide NPs comprising nonprecious metal oxides owing to their unique magnetic, optical, and catalytic properties. The production of shape-controlled heterometallic NPs consisting of Pt and nonprecious metal oxides is crucial to demonstrate the composition–property relationship of NPs. Herein, a facile one-pot approach for the controlled synthesis of dumbbell-like Pt–Fe3O4–MnOx and dendritic Pt–MnOx NPs were reported. The key to the success of this synthesis is in changing the quantity of Fe(CO)5 additive to control the reaction kinetics. In the absence of Fe(CO)5, dendritic Pt–MnOx NPs were synthesized through the assembly of small seed NPs. On the other hand, dumbbell-like Pt–Fe3O4–MnOx NPs were obtained in the presence of Fe(CO)5 through controlling the nucleation and growth of Fe and Mn on the Pt NPs, followed by air oxidation. Compared to a Pt/graphene oxide (GO) catalyst, dumbbell-like Pt–Fe3O4–MnOx NPs on GO showed an enhancement of specific activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction owing to the compressive-strain effect exerted on the Pt lattice.

Biography:
Yusuf Mohammad was born in Pamekasan, Indonesia, in 1991. He received his B.Sc. degree (2014) and now is a member in Intelligent Organometallic Chemistry laboratory (IOM) of Pusan National University (PNU), Korea. IOM lab currently concentrating research efforts on catalysis that is utilizing nanoparticles and organometallic compounds. He continues his master degree program in IOM PNU, Korea under Korean Government Scholarship Program. His current research interests include, development of natural zeolite, free metal functionalized graphene, iron oxide nanoparticles, and its applications toward catalytic effect on organic reactions and electrocatalysts.

Shah Ashraf
Shah Ashraf

National Institute of Technology Srinagar, INDIA

Title of Talk: Nanoscience: An interdisciplinary science for society and humanity

Shah Ashraf

National Institute of Technology Srinagar, INDIA

Title of Talk:
Nanoscience: An interdisciplinary science for society and humanity

Abstract:
Science has allowed humans to flourish in numbers unimaginable to our ancestors. For centuries, science has explored and continually redefined the frontiers of our knowledge and wisdom. For the past two decades, one part of that frontier has moved inward, reaching ever smaller dimensions by penetrating to the nanoscale—one billionth of a meter (nanosciences). Having entered the nanoscale world, scientists and engineers are gaining increasing control over the properties of matter and are creating novel applications that have the potential to transform almost everything. It is for the first time in the history of science, scientific revolution has occurred, based on the ability to measure matter on the nanometer scale in a skillful manner. This science would directly benefit a common man when it comes to commercial use and there is an immediate need to convert this science with proper technology [1]. Materials and devices at the nanoscale hold vast promise for innovation in virtually every industry and public endeavor including health, electronics, transportation, environment, and national security and have been heralded as the next industrial revolution. The social sciences and humanities have significant roles to play in nanotechnology beyond addressing the issues of public perception. Bio-safe and bio-compatible route for the fabrication of metal oxide nanomaterials using water as solvent as well as source of oxygen has been explored. We also report the fabrication of electrochemically anodized multi-podal TiO2 nanotube array’s (MTNA) and modified them with optimized amount of light sensitizing semiconducting material Fe2O3 [2]. The prospects of the process are bright and promising. There are number of applications which shall be discussed during the talk.

Biography:
Dr. Shah Mohd Ashraf after completing doctorial studies in Condensed Matter Physics, was appointed as Assistant Professor in National Institute of Technology Srinagar in year 1999. Here, Shah embarked upon new research programme, pioneered the synthesis of broad range of nanomaterials and established World Bank Funded Research Centre (Special Centre for Nanosciences) and laid the foundations to learn the new sciences-Nanotechnology in early twenties. In year 2009, shah moved to Middle East on deputation for a short period of two years and published book titled, "Principles of Nanoscience & Nanotechnology" with Dr. T. Ahmad, an eminent Chemist. Dr. Shah is teaching Nanotechnology, Materials Science and Materials Characterization from the last two decades and is actively engaged as reviewer /editor of many scientific journals. Shah has authored more than 75 international peer reviewed scientific papers in National and International journals and has written 5 Books on Nanotechnology and many Book Chapters with reputed international publishers. In his research, he has targeted bio-compatible and energy harvesting nano-materials, which has applications in day to day life. Shah has been awarded two major projects by the Govt of India under Nano-Mission and leadership qualities in taking lead role in innovative programmes have been acknowledged on many occasions. Shah has delivered invited talks in number of international forums. Dr. shah is also a member of many science academies and societies and his work has been cited by number of scientific reporters as well as scientific media. Organiser and Chair of several national and international symposia, schools and conferences which includes 3rd Int. Conference on "Nanotechnology for Better living" from 25-29 May 2016 in collaboration with IIT Kanpur. In his spare time, Dr. Shah is regularly organising INSPIRE internship programme launched by Hon’ble Prime Minister of India for the bright and genius students of the Kashmir Valley, which aims to attract talented students for the study of Science and Technology in early age which ultimately will bring peace across the globe.

Sajid Ali
Sajid Ali

University of Technology Sydney, Australia.

Title of Talk: Defect States in Hexagonal Boron Nitride: Assignments of Observed Properties and Prediction of Properties relevant to Quantum Computation

Sajid Ali

University of Technology Sydney, Australia.

Title of Talk:
Defect States in Hexagonal Boron Nitride: Assignments of Observed Properties and Prediction of Properties relevant to Quantum Computation

Abstract:
Key properties of 9 possible defect sites in hexagonal boronitride (h-BN), VN, VN-1, CN, VNO2B, VNNB, VNCB, VBCN, VBCNSiN, and VNCBSiB, are predicted using density-functional theory (DFT) corrected applying results from high-level ab initio calculations. Observed h-BN electron-paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals at 22.4 MHz, 20.83 MHz, and 352.70 MHz are assigned to VN, CN, and VNO2B, respectively, while the observed photoemission at 1.95 eV is assigned to VNCB. Detailed consideration of the available excited states, allowed spin-orbit couplings, zero-field splitting, and optical transitions is made for somewhat analogous defects VNCB and VBCN. Long-living quantum memory in h-BN can be achieved for VNCB owing to the lifetime differences of first and second order transitions from different triplet sub-states to the singlet ground state as is seen for N2V defect in diamond. While VBCN is predicted to have a triplet ground state, and for it spin-polarization by optical means is predicted to be feasible while suitable optical excitations are also identified, making this defect of interest for possible quantum-qubit operations.

Biography:
SAJID ALI is a 3rd year PhD student at University of Technology Sydney, Ultimo, New South Wales 2007, Australia. He is also a lecturer in physics at GC University Faisalabad, PAKISTAN. . He has over 15 publications that have been cited over 100 times.

Aboubakr M. Abdullah
Aboubakr M. Abdullah

Qatar University, Doha, Qatar

Title of Talk: Synthesis, characterization and application of a new Ni-P-carbon nitride nanocomposite

Aboubakr M. Abdullah

Qatar University, Doha, Qatar

Title of Talk:
Synthesis, characterization and application of a new Ni-P-carbon nitride nanocomposite

Abstract:
Dispersion of carbon nitride (C3N4) nanosheets into a nickel phosphorous (NiP) matrix was successfully achieved by ultrasonication during the electroless plating of NiP from an acidic bath. The morphology and thickness, elemental analysis, phases, roughness and wettability for as-plated and heat-treated nanocomposite were determined by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and contact angle measurements, respectively. C3N4 showed a homogeneous distribution morphology in the nanocomposite that changed from amorphous in case of the NiP to a mixed crystalline-amorphous structure in the NiP-C3N4 nanocomposite. The microhardness and corrosion resistance of the nanocomposite as plated and heat treated nanocomposite coating were significantly enhanced compared to the Ni-P. The nanocomposite showed a superior corrosion protection efficiency ~ 95%, as observed from the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. On the other hand, the microhardness of the nanocomposite was significantly increased from 500 to reach 1175 HV200 for NiP and NiP-C3N4 respectively.

Biography:
Dr. Aboubakr M. Abdullah started his work at Qatar University, Doha in 2012. He is currently, the Hydro/Qatalum Chair Professor at The Center for Advanced Materials in the same university. In 2003, he was awarded his Ph.D. from The Pennsylvania State University (PSU), USA in Materials Science and Engineering. In addition, he worked at Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan as a Research Associate until 2009 followed by a one year at The University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. From 2010 to 2012, he joined the Chemical Engineering Department at the Egypt-Japan University of Science and Technology, Alexandria, Egypt.

Friesenbichler Walter
Friesenbichler Walter

Chair for Injection Molding of Polymers, Montan universitaet Leoben, Austria

Title of Talk: Influence of Elongational Flow generating Nozzles on Material Properties of Polypropylene Nanocomposites

Friesenbichler Walter

Chair for Injection Molding of Polymers, Montan universitaet Leoben, Austria

Title of Talk:
Influence of Elongational Flow generating Nozzles on Material Properties of Polypropylene Nanocomposites

Abstract:
Polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) represent one of the most intensively studied classes of materials in recent years. A PNC consists of inorganic fillers dispersed in organic polymers, where at least one dimension of length is in the nanometer scale. Alongside engineering polymers like PA, PBT and POM, commodity polymers like PE and PP are also getting more attention in the PNC field. This work focuses on the processing of layered silicates and the additional activation of polypropylene PNCs using elongational flow. The aim was to replace the time consuming masterbatch (MB) process through a energy-saving and cost-effective one-step- process (simultaneous dosing of all three components of the polypropylene PNCs and subsequent injection molding of specimens) which we call injection molding compounding. In this study, polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) based on polypropylene (PP), organoclay and compatibilizer were prepared via compounding by a MB- or the one-step process. The compounds were then injection molded into tensile test specimens and rectangular plates by means of systematical variations of conically and hyperbolically shaped nozzles in a full factorial experimental design. The use of these nozzles in the injection unit was to enhance intercalation and exfoliation in the PNCs by means of elongational flow. The pressure loss and temperature rise in the compound induced by this flow were characterized in temperature and pressure measurements. Mechanical as well as rheological characterizations were performed on the produced test specimens. The compounds from the MB process showed good intercalation and exfoliation and improved mechanical properties without any special elongational flow treatment. With the one-step process and elongational treatment using an optimized hyperbolic nozzle it was possible to improve the mechanical properties to a level which is 10 % higher than reachable with the conventional MB-process. The additional pressure drop for the elongational treatment was only around 75 bars compared to the use of a standard injection molding nozzle. These results indicated that it is possible to eliminate one complete compounding step with injection molding compounding and to achieve slightly improved mechanical properties in PP-PNC parts when elongational elements were used.

Biography:
Prof. Walter Friesenbichler studied Polymer Engineering and Science at the Montanuniversitaet Leoben in Austria. Since July 2010 he is Full-Professor for Injection Molding of Polymers at Montanuniversitaet. His research has centered on the areas (1) injection molding and simulation, (2) applied rheology and (3) polymer nanocomposites. Since 1985 he is working in the field of applied rheology for polymers using processing machines with strong focus on practice-related melt preparation, wall slip, correction of viscosity due to viscous dissipation and pressure dependence of viscosity. Since 2010 his main focus is on rubber injection molding and material data measurement für rubber compounds.

Cristian Miranda
Cristian Miranda

University of Concepción, Chile

Title of Talk: Improves photocatalytic activity and elimination of ZnO photocorrosion by ZnO@GO nanoparticles formation

Cristian Miranda

University of Concepción, Chile

Title of Talk:
Improves photocatalytic activity and elimination of ZnO photocorrosion by ZnO@GO nanoparticles formation

Abstract:
The synthesis of catalysts modified for photocatalytic applications has been extensively studied. There are several preparation techniques, the main one being the sol-gel technique [1]. Others such as doping by calcination [2] or graphitizing by calcination [3,4], supported on activated charcoal [5,6], also are important in the synthesis of photocatalysts, all with the objective of improving photocatalytic properties such as expanding the range of photon asbortion, adding surface acid groups or reducing the effect of photocorrosion, among others. Three core-shell catalysts of zinc oxide coated with graphene oxide (ZnO@GO) were prepared and characterized from graphitized ZnO nanoparticles prepared by the technique described by Zhu et al. [3], from ZnO and glucose according to the 1:1; 1:2 and 1:3 mass ratio ZnO / glucose ratio. Graphene oxide (GO) exfoliated from graphite oxide (GtO) was obtained by strong oxidation using a strong mineral acid (conc. H2SO4) in the presence of an oxidizing agent (KMnO4) (Hummers method) [7]. The characterization of the catalysts obtained was performed using various techniques such as XPS, SEM, X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy, as well as the determination of the isoelectric point, BET surface, among others. The photocatalytic efficiency and the percentage of ZnO photocorrosion were evaluated according to the film size of GO from the photocatalytic degradation of phenol. The presence of GO layers could significantly suppress the ZnO photocorrosion under UV light irradiation, as well as the ZnO susceptibility to easy dissolution at low pH values. The photocatalytic activity of ZnO can also be improved because of improved adsorption capacity and the presence of hydrophilic functional groups. The photocatalytic activity is also increased by the effect of the increase in the rate of charge distribution in the crystalline structure of ZnO. The nanometric structure of ZnO was well conserved even after high temperature calcination due to the layer of carbon layers.

Biography:
Dr. Cristian Miranda obtained his PhD. in 2014 at the Universidad de Concepción. He has 5 years of experience in the development, formulation and execution of I+D projects. Outstanding in the development and characterization of materials with antibacterial processes, synthesis and characterization of materials for photocatalytic processes of water purification, synthesis of hybrid photocatalytic materials, treatment and recovery of metals from waters contaminated with metal salts and organometallic compounds. It has 7 scientific publications, 2 patent applications in progress, 1 chapter "Copper" magazine (2015). The year 2017 won the UDEC Science Award with Impact, for his contribution in the technological transfer.

Avesh Kumar
Avesh Kumar

Dr. B. R. Ambedkar University, Agra-282002, India

Title of Talk: Tunable work function and optical nonlinearity of nanocomposites

Avesh Kumar

Dr. B. R. Ambedkar University, Agra-282002, India

Title of Talk:
Tunable work function and optical nonlinearity of nanocomposites

Abstract:
Tunability of work function and optical nonlinearity is carried out by doping Au nanoparticles in TiO2. The work function and optical nonlinearity are found to be inversely related with respect to concentration of Au. The observed decrease in work function with increasing concentration of Au is due to charge transfer between TiO2 and Au nanoparticles in the presence of ultraviolet light irradiation during the formation of Au-TiO2 nanocomposites [1, 2]. The systematic change in the work function with Au concentration plays a major role in optical nonlinearity. The estimated optical nonlinearity was found to increase from 3.80×10-6 to 9.69×10-6 esu with increase in Au concentrations from 0 to 1.010-2 M. This observed increment in nonlinearity is due to the enhancement of local electric field created by excitation of surface plasmon resonance [3] that affects the work function. Therefore, the surface plasmon resonance and work function help in tuning the optical nonlinearity. The tunable nonlinear optical response of the Au-TiO2 nanocomposites may find applications in nonlinear optics at wavelength 532 nm, a commonly available high power laser. The structural properties of film are investigated using transmission electron microscopy technique. The SPR absorption peaks of TiO2 and Au-TiO2 were recorded using UV visible spectrophotometer. The work function of films was measured by scanning Kelvin probe microscopy from KP technology, the nonlinear optical refractive index and nonlinear optical absorption coefficient of Au-TiO2 nanocomposites were simultaneously measured using z-scan technique.

Biography:
Myself, Dr. Avesh Kumar am currently a post-doctoral Fellow at Dr. Bhim Rao Ambedkar University, Agra, India. I did Ph.D. in nanomaterial science form School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India. My research work is related to synthesis of metal-oxide nanoparticles and growth of semiconductor nanocomposite thin films, study of their structural, optical and electrical properties, application of these nanocomposite thin films as photocatalyst, solar cell, optoelectronics. I have published many research papers in reputed international journals with good impact factor. I have visited University of Marseille, Aix-en-Provence, France to present my research work in international conference.

José Miguel Martínez Valle
José Miguel Martínez Valle

University of Córdoba (Spain).

Title of Talk: Effective finite element methods for the dynamic analysis of composite shell structures

José Miguel Martínez Valle

University of Córdoba (Spain).

Title of Talk:
Effective finite element methods for the dynamic analysis of composite shell structures

Abstract:
Composite materials are frequently used for shell structures. This kind of structures are widely used in a variety of engineering applications ranging from domes for major buildings and components of flight structures to liquid storage containers. Among them, there are a lot of shell structures with the shape of elliptic paraboloid, hyperbolic paraboloid or velaroidal shells; however, the dynamic analysis of this kind of structures is rather limited [1]. Most studies refer to shallow and thin composite shells [2], [3], [4] and develop complex shell finite elements with elaborate techniques. The main objective of this work is to formulate an optimal shell finite element method for dynamic analysis to be valid for general shell structures and have some desirable features: i) Avoidance of locking and zero energy modes with decreasing thickness. ii) Straightforward extension to nonlinear formulations. iii) Uniform convergence to the exact solution of the mathematical model irrespective of the shell geometry and thickness. iv) Insensitivity of the formulation to different boundary conditions and element distortions In this work, we present a simple methodology based on the Mixed Interpolation of Tensorial Components (MITC) approach in order to avoid shear and membrane locking. Originally introduced by Bathe and Dvorkin [5] for low order elements, and Bucalem and Bathe [6] for high order elements, it fits comfortably to the proposed formulation. We develop the stiffness matrix of the element and the consistent mass matrix in tensor notation, valid for any geometry of the shell, and also discuss the use of the lumped mass matrix. Different tests have been carried out using this element with excellent results.

Biography:
Jose M. Martinez Valle is Assistant Professor with the Department of Mechanics in the University of Cordoba, Spain. He has received the Ph.D. degree in structural mechanics from the University of Cordoba in 2014. He has coauthored several papers for national and international conferences and journals related to computational mechanics and educational sciences. His research interests include structural mechanics, advanced finite element methods for plates and shells and educational/computer technology. He has done several research stays in the University of Thessaloniki (Greece) at the division of Structural Mechanics, advisor Demosthenes Talaslidis, and The National Scientific and Technical Research Council (CONICET) in Santa Fe (Argentina), University of Litoral, advisor: Victor Fachinotti. The last publications in peer reviewed journals (JCR) are: “Noise and Vibration Risk Prevention Virtual Web for Ubiquitous Training”. “IEEE Transactions on Education. Volume:58 Issue:4”. Indexed in JCR. 2015. “Modified Bolle Reissners theory of plates including transverse shear deformations”. “Latin American Journal of Solids and Structures, LAJSS”. Indexed in JCR. 2015. "A New Refined Theory Of Plates With Transverse Shear Deformation For Moderately Thick And Thick Plates”. Latin American Applied Research, LAAR. Indexed in JCR. 2016. “Study Of The Vibrations Of Moderately Thick Doubly Curved Shells Via Efficient 3d Elements”. Latin American Applied Research, LAAR. Indexed in JCR. 2016 “Inverse finite element modeling of shells using the degenerate solid approach”, Computers & Structures, 2015. Indexed in JCR. 2015 “A Refined Theory of Moderately Thick Plates According to Exposition of the Classical Technical Theories, Theoretical Aspects”. Applied Mechanics and Materials. Indexed in SJR. 2014

Andreas Schnepf
Andreas Schnepf

Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University Tübingen, Germany

Title of Talk: Metalloid Clusters of main Group and Precious Metals

Andreas Schnepf

Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University Tübingen, Germany

Title of Talk:
Metalloid Clusters of main Group and Precious Metals

Abstract:
An important prerequisite for an understanding of size dependent properties of clusters or nanoparticles; e.g. the transition molecule → semi-metal → metal, is the knowledge of the structure. This finding seems trivial however, for metals or semi-metals only few compounds are structurally known in the area between the molecular and solid state. Metalloid clusters of the general formulae MnRm with n > m (M = metal;R = ligand) are ideal model compounds for this nanoscaled area, opening our eyes to the complexity and the fundamental principles of the dissolution and the formation of metals.[1] Thereby in the nanoscaled regime novel physical and chemical properties emerge. The most fruitful synthetic approach to metalloid germanium clusters applies the disproprotionation reaction of Ge(I) halides [2], leading to metalloid clusters like Ge12[FeCp(CO)2]8[FeCpCO]2 1 or [Li(THF)2)]Ge14[Si(SiMe3)3]5 2 [3]. Despite this metalloid gold clusters are obtained via the reduction of a gold precursor like HAuCl4 with e.g. NaBH4 in the presence of a thiol ligand leading to metalloid clusters like Au102(p-MBA)44 3 (p-MBA = p-mercaptobenzoic acid)[4]. Here we discuss the synthesis, structural features and bonding properties of recent results in germanium and gold chemistry and their relation to the corresponding element and other metalloid clusters.

Biography:
1990 – 1996: Study of chemistry; University of Karlsruhe (TH).  12/1996: Diploma thesis in organic chemistry with Prof. Dr. H.-J. Knölker  05/2000: Doctoral thesis in inorganic chemistry with Prof. Dr. H. Schnöckel  2000 – 2002: Postdoc at the institute of inorganic chemistry, University of Karlsruhe (Research stays at the research facilities in Hamburg (DESY Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron) and Villingen (PSI: Paul Scherrer Institute)  2002 – 2006: Habilitation at the Institute of inorganic chemistry at the University of Karlsruhe.  2006 – 2010: Privatdozent at the University of Karlsruhe  2010 – 2012: W2-Professor (Inorganic Chemistry) University Duisburg-Essen.  2013 – now: W3-Professor (Functional Nanostructured Materials) University Tübingen.

Eduard  Zenkevich
Eduard Zenkevich

University of Belarus, Belarus

Title of Talk: Interface phenomena and exciton relaxation in self-assembled nanocomposites “CdSe/ZnS quantum dot – functionalized dye molecule”

Eduard Zenkevich

University of Belarus, Belarus

Title of Talk:
Interface phenomena and exciton relaxation in self-assembled nanocomposites “CdSe/ZnS quantum dot – functionalized dye molecule”

Abstract:
Organic-inorganic nanostructures based on colloidal semiconducting quantum dots (QDs) in combination with organic dye molecules are of special interest with respect to nanodevices, sensor technology and photovoltaics. We have shown that the attachment of one or few dye molecules (tetrapyridyl substituted porphyrins or perylene bisimides) via suitable anchor groups to the surface of QDs (CdSe or CdSe/ZnS of various sizes) is followed by QD photopluminescence (PL) quenching and PL decay times shortening. In this report, we present a detailed comparison of static and dynamic PL quenching via spectral intensities and PL decays. We were able to separate FRET (leading to 10-14 % of the total quenching effeiciency) and non-FRET processes quantitatively comparing QD donor PL quenching and porphyrin acceptor fluorescence enhancement. The FRET related part is in agreement with the Foerster-type model while non-FRET is related to the replacement of several ligands by the spacious and chemically differently bonding dye molecules. Based on bulk and single nanoobjects detection results, we have shown that non-FRET QD PL quenching results in an increase of the relative contribution of intrinsic weakly radiative QD states. In terms of single QD spectroscopy, the dye attachment increases the probabilities of dark and dim states. The modification and/or creation of dye induced surface traps is due to formation of additional and/or new Cd2+ dangling bonds at the QD surface because of dye-induced ligand depletion. The obtained results demonstrate that on the basis of the combination of steady-state and time-resolved measurements for bulk and single QD-dye nanoassemblies, it is in principle feasible to follow non-radiative pathways from near-band energy states to intra-gap states thus investigating microscopic features of surface related energy distributions and decay channels.

Biography:
Eduard Zenkevich (born in 1945): graduated from Belarussian State University (1967, Minsk, Belarus), PhD Degree (1973), Doctor Habil. (1990). Full Professor of Physics (1998, Institute of Molecular and Atomic Physics, NAS of Belarus), Full Professor of Physics (2007, Belarussian National Technical University). Main research activities: structure/relaxation dynamics relationships in nanoscale self-assembled objects: multiporphyrin structures, pigment-protein complexes, “semiconductor quantum dot – dye molecule” nanocomposites. Visiting professor and lecturer at the Institute of Physics, University of Technology Chemnitz (1993-2016, Germany); accredited expert of Russian Corporation of Nanotechnologies “ROSNANO” (2010). The total list of publications includes more than 200 publications in refereed periodicals, two books.

Vladimir Fomin
Vladimir Fomin

Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, Germany

Title of Talk: Theory of Phonons in Multishell Microtubes

Vladimir Fomin

Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, Germany

Title of Talk:
Theory of Phonons in Multishell Microtubes

Abstract:
Exploration and engineering of lattice dynamics and phonon transport at the nanoscale –nanophononics – have become a rapidly advancing domain of nanophysics and nanotechnologies. Efficient nanoscale control of acoustic phonons is of immanent importance for design and fabrication of novel nanoelectronic systems, nano- and optomechanical devices, thermoelectric materials for energy harvesting and solid-state refrigeration, micro- and nanoscale resonators, phonon-based quantum memories and biomedical applications, for development of phononic computing and information processing. In new classes of hybrid nanoarchitectures, core–multishell semiconductor nanowires and self-assembled rolled-up nanostructured microtubes, the strain is partially released along the radial direction, thus allowing the creation of heterostructures, based on lattice-mismatched materials. Our theoretical analysis of phonon spectra in multishell nanostructured microtubes [1] has revealed the fact that the number of shells NL (i.e., the key geometric characteristic) is an important control parameter of the phonon dispersion along with the structure dimensions and acoustic impedance mismatch between the constituent layers. The decrease of the phonon frequencies in the long-wave limit is inversely proportional to NL. Away from the long-wave limit, a general trend of “compression” of the phonon energy spectrum towards lower values of phonon frequencies persists. At small wave vectors, the phonon group velocities decrease with increasing NL. Analysis performed on a large interval of wave vectors and in a wide spectrum of frequencies implies a prominent effect of the number of layers on the phonon dispersion, phonon group velocity and the density of states of phonons as well as on the phonon transport. An effective approach to manage the thermal conductivity of Si thin-film-based nanoarchitectures has been realized through the formation of radial and planar Si/SiOx hybrid nanomembrane superlattices (HNMSLs) [2]. For the radial Si/SiOx HNMSLs with various numbers of windings, there occurs a continuous reduction in the thermal conductivity with increasing number of windings. A theoretical model developed within the framework of the Born−von Karman Lattice Dynamics alloved for a quantitative interpretation of the experimental data [2]. It indicates that the thermal conductivity of Si/SiOx HNMSLs is largely determined by the phonon processes in the SiOx layers. Rolled-up systems, consisting of hybrid materials, such as inorganic/organic, semiconductor/metal or crystalline/amorphous heterostructures, show fascinating potential in tailoring the phonon properties because of varying contributions of individual components.

Biography:
Vladimir M. Fomin, research professor at the Institute for Integrative Nanosciences (IIN), Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW) Dresden. Member of APS, German Physical Society, European Physical Society, IEEE, Nanoscale Superconductivity COST Action (European Cooperation in Science and Technology), Mediterranean Institute of Fundamental Physics. Doctoral studies in Kishinev at the Department of Theoretical Physics of the State University of Moldova. Ph.D. in theoretical physics in 1978. Work in the Lab. “Physics of Multi-Layer Structures” at the State University of Moldova (from scientific researcher to director). Research interests: non-linear optical properties and transport due to the charge-vibrational interaction in semiconductors and in multi-layer structures, including derivation of the phonon spectra and the electron–phonon interaction; classification of polaritons and phonons; polaronic, bipolaronic and excitonic effects in arbitrary multi-layer structures. State Prize of Moldova 1987. Dr. habilitat in physical and mathematical sciences (Academy of Sciences of Moldova, 1990). University Professor in Theoretical Physics (State University of Moldova, since 1995). Research Fellow of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation (Martin-Luther-University of Halle, 1993–1994). Research at the Lab. Theoretical Solid State Physics (University of Antwerp, 1995–2008) and the Group Photonics and Semiconductor Nanophysics (Eindhoven University of Technology, 1998–1999, 2003–2007), Division Quantum and Physical Chemistry (Catholic University of Leuven, 2008), Faculty of Physics (University of Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg, 2008–2009), IIN IFW-Dresden (since 2009). Diploma of a Scientific Discovery of the Phenomenon of the Propagation of Spatially-Extended Interface Phonon Polaritons in Composite Superlattices (Academy of Natural Sciences of Russia, 1999). Medal “Academician P. L. Kapitsa” (Academy of Natural Sciences of Russia, 2000). Honorary Member of the Academy of Sciences of Moldova (2007). Scientific interests in nanophysics: theory of strain-induced nano-architectures, in particular, physical properties of self-assembled nano- and microstructures (quantum rings, superlattices of quantum dots, rolled-up semiconductor and superconductor membranes), optical properties of quantum dots, persistent currents and magnetization of quantum rings; phase boundaries and vortex matter in meso-, nanoscopic and patterned superconductors; superconducting properties of metallic nanograins; surface-induced magnetic anisotropy in mesoscopic systems of dilute magnetic alloys; quantum transport in sub-0.1 micron semiconductor devices; vibrational excitations and polaronic effects in nanostructures; thermoelectric properties of semiconductor nanostructures. 3 monographs, including “Physics of Quantum Rings”, Springer, 2014 (Editor), 3 textbooks, 9 review papers, 10 patents and about 200 scientific articles.

N. Kamoun Turki
N. Kamoun Turki

Université de Tunis El Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Tunisia

Title of Talk: Investigations on the growth of quaternary nanomaterials Cu2In(1-X)GaxS2 and Cu2ZnSnS4 for solar cell devices.

N. Kamoun Turki

Université de Tunis El Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Tunisia

Title of Talk:
Investigations on the growth of quaternary nanomaterials Cu2In(1-X)GaxS2 and Cu2ZnSnS4 for solar cell devices.

Abstract:
CuIn1_xGaxS2 (CIGS) and Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) multi-component semiconductor thin films were prepared on glass substrates by chemical spray pyrolysis. CIGS thin layers are grown using different concentrations of gallium in the spray solutions (y = ([Ga3+]/[In3+]) varying from 0 to 20 at% by a step of 5 at%). We reported two new structures for CuInS2/β-In2_xAlxS2/ZnO:Al and CuIn1_xGaxS2 (y = 10 at%)/β-In2-xAlxS2/ZnO:Al solar cells to investigate the effect of gallium incorporation on the photovoltaic parameters. We found that the Ga-containing cell shows conversion efficiency higher than the Ga-free reference cell due to higher open-circuit voltage (Voc = 540 mV) and short-circuit current density (Jsc = 10 mA cm_2). Then CIGS may be replaced by Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) which has received considerable attention as one of the promising absorbers for the fabrication of solar cells with conversion efficiency close to 12.6% . Sprayed Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films have been prepared using both aqueous and alcoholic solution. For the aqueous solution, CZTS thin films, elaborated at a substrate temperature of 280 °C and followed by a thermal treatment under nitrogen atmosphere at 500 °C, present the best physical properties. For the CZTS sprayed using the methanol as solvent, The thin film prepared at 0.04 M as thiourea concentration exhibits much better crystallinity, less secondary phases and has the closest band gap to the theoretical value. Followed by an annealing process under nitrogen atmosphere for an hour at 550 °C, the structural, optical and electrical properties of that film shows a drastic improvements

Biography:
She is a full Professor at the Faculty of Sciences of Tunis (FST) University of Tunis El Manar Tunisia. She obtained her PhD thesis in 1992 from FST and the Habilitation (HDR) in Physics in Tunisia (FST) in 2000 and she is a Professor since 2007. Her academic research focuses on Transparent conductive oxides (TCO : ZnO, SnO2, In2O3, TiO2, MoO3, Fe2O3 and Fe3O4), binary semiconductors (In2S3, SnS, CdS, Cu2S, ZnS, PbS and MgS), ternary (CuInS2, In(2-x)GaxS2, P3HT and P3OT) and quaternary compounds (CuIn(1-x)GaxS2 :CIGS and Cu2ZnSnS4 :CZTS) for opto-electronic applications such as photocatalysis, gaz sensors, solar cells, UV and IR detectors. Nanomaterials and thin films are grown by different low cost techniques (spray pyrolysis, chemical bath deposition (CBD), spin coating, electrodeposition and sputtering). She pulished about 100 papers in International Journals with impact factor and supervised more than 20 PhD thesis. Since 1989 she is a researcher in Physics Condensed Matter Laboratory (LPMC) where she was a head (2011-2015). In the period 2013-2014 she occupied the post of General Director of Physico-Chemical Analysis Institute (INRAP) in the Technopole of Sidi Thabet. She was a vice President of AUF COMARES (for MAGHREB : 2013-2015) and she is, since 2013, a representative of the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research on the board of directors of the National Metrology Agency (ANM). Since 2001 she is a Director of Synthesis of nanomaterials and thin film semiconductors for optoelectronic applications, Physics Condensed Matter Laboratory. In 2016 she is elected a TWAS (The World Academy of Science) member. Since 2015 she is elected as ARA (American Romanian Academy) member.

Roberto Grau
Roberto Grau

Universidad Nacional de Rosario (UNR) y Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET). Argentina.

Title of Talk: Metal nanoparticles as a novel and safe strategy to fight pathogenic spores and antibiotic-resistant microbial biofilms.

Roberto Grau

Universidad Nacional de Rosario (UNR) y Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET). Argentina.

Title of Talk:
Metal nanoparticles as a novel and safe strategy to fight pathogenic spores and antibiotic-resistant microbial biofilms.

Abstract:
Biofilms are three-dimensional structures that contains billions of genetically identical bacteria submerged in a self-produced extracellular matrix, which protect bacteria from antibiotics and the human immunological defenses. More than 85 % of chronic and/or recurrent human infections are linked to bacterial biofilms. In addition, spore-forming pathogenic bacteria represent an additional community threat because of their intrinsic refractory behavior against antibiotics, phagocytes and their easy utilization in bioterrorist attacks. Therefore, every day the available microbicide arsenal against biofilms and spores becomes scarcer. Accordingly, nano-material biotechnology emerges as a promising alternative for reducing the detrimental effects of microbial-related diseases. Here we describe the development of novel nanostructured coating systems with improved photocatalytic and antibacterial activities. These systems comprise, in one case, layers of SiO2 followed by layers of mesoporous or dense TiO2-anatase, and doping with silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs). In the other case, we developed Copper NPs and its oxides by a chemical method based on a bottom up approach and its stabilization using aminosilanes as surface modifiers. The activity of CuNPs and AgNPs (MNPs) was measured against spores and vegetative (planktonic and sessile) forms of the relevant human pathogens Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (etiological agent of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome), Listeria monocytogenes (etiological agent of septic abortion), Bacillus anthracis (etiological agent of Anthrax), Clostridium perfringens (etiological agent of food-associated diarrhea and Gas Gangrene), cystic-fibrosis related Pseudomona aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ( etiological agent of sepsis and myocardiopathies). The planktonic and sessile growth (measured as the final cellular yield at 600 nm and crystal violet staining, respectively) of each pathogen, as well as the sporocide effect on C. perfringens and B. anthracis spores, was very significant at submillimolar concentrations of MNPs (95 % of vegetative growth inhibition and sporocide effect, p < 0.01). The anti-biofilm effect against the bacterial pathogens was exerted at genetic level as revealed by the downregulated expression produced by the MNPs on transcriptional β-galactosidase and gfp-fluorescence reporter fusions to genes involved in extracellular matrix synthesis. MNP-treatment of pre-formed biofilms dramatically accelerated their dissembling and cellular death without dispersal cell formation. Interestingly, the emergency of MNP-resistant bacterial cells after ten-days of treatment with sub-MIC concentrations of the microbicide was significantly lower (p < 0.01) than the emerged resistance after bacterial treatment with commonly-used available antibiotics. The importance of the MNP treatment adoption as a safe alternative for reducing and preventing pathogen bioburden is discussed.

Biography:
Roberto Grau completed his PhD from Rosario National University in Argentina and obtained his postdoctoral studies from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), Department of Experimental Medicine at San Diego, California, USA. He is a Pew Latin American Fellow (San Francisco, USA), a Fulbright International Scholar (WashigntonDC, USA) and the director of the Molecular Microbiology and Environmental Science Laboratory of the National Council of Scientific Research of Argentina (CONICET). Roberto obtained many national and international awards, published more than 30 papers in reputed journals, formed more than seventy profesionals in science and founded and/or catalyzed the creation of half-dozen biotechnological companies.

Cecile Reynaud
Cecile Reynaud

Université Paris-Saclay, CEA Saclay, France

Title of Talk: Growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on aluminum foils

Cecile Reynaud

Université Paris-Saclay, CEA Saclay, France

Title of Talk:
Growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on aluminum foils

Abstract:
Forests of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are attractive nanomaterials because of their unique structural, electrical and thermal properties. However, many applications require their growth on metallic substrates. Catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) is the best method to grow them but the catalytic particles can diffuse rapidly into the metal subsurface and thus become inactive. In this communication, I will address this issue through the recent results obtained in our laboratory. I will show how it is possible to grow VACNT on carbon fibers [1], stainless steel and aluminum surfaces by a single-step process, namely the aerosol assisted CCVD, where the catalyst and carbon precursors are injected simultaneously [2]. In the case of aluminum, due to its low melting temperature, the synthesis of VACNT requires a significant reduction in the growth temperature as compared to conventional substrates [3]. Our results show that, with our single-step process, it is possible to obtain clean, long and dense VACNTs, with a growth rate at the best state of the art level for such a low temperature. A particular attention has been paid to the study of the CNT/Al interface. The results suggest the crucial role of the interface for an efficient and reproducible VACNT growth. Finally, I will show that the aerosol-assisted CCVD process can be scaled-up [4] to enable the fabrication of innovative ultracapacitors [5] based on VACNTs grown on aluminum foils. [1] M. Delmas, M. Pinault, S. Patel, D. Porterat, C. Reynaud, M. Mayne-L’Hermite, Growth of long and aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes on carbon and metal substrates., Nanotechnology. 23 (2012) 105604. [2] P. Landois, M. Pinault, S. Rouzière, D. Porterat, C. Mocuta, E. Elkaim, M. Mayne-L’Hermite, P. Launois, In situ time resolved wide angle X-Ray diffraction study of nanotube carpet growth: nature of catalyst particles and progressive nanotube alignment, Carbon N. Y. 7 (2015) 0–10. [3] C. Castro, M. Pinault, D. Porterat, C. Reynaud, M. Mayne-L’Hermite, The role of hydrogen in the aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition process in producing thin and densely packed vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, Carbon N. Y. 61 (2013) 585–594. [4] P. Boulanger, L. Belkadi, J. Descarpentries, D. Porterat, E. Hibert, A. Brouzes, M. Mille, S. Patel, M. Pinault, C. Reynaud, M. Mayne-L’Hermite, J.M. Decamps, Towards large scale aligned carbon nanotube composites: an industrial safe-by-design and sustainable approach, J. Phys. Conf. Ser. 429 (2013) 12050. [5] S. Lagoutte, P.-H. Aubert, M. Pinault, F.O. Tran-Van, M. Mayne-L’Hermite, C. Chevrot, Poly(3-methylthiophene)/Vertically Aligned Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes: Electrochemical Synthesis, Characterizations and Electrochemical Storage Properties in Ionic Liquids, Electrochim. Acta. 130 (2014) 754–765.

Biography:
Cecile Reynaud has her expertise in the synthesis and chemical physics of nanomaterials. Her work has mainly dealt with silicon nanocrystals and aligned carbon nanotubes. She was for 15 years at the head of the Laboratory of Nanometric Assemblies (LEDNA) in the fundamental research division of Saclay CEA center. The LEDNA group follows the "bottom-up" approach of nanosciences. It develops its own synthesis methods and obtains nanostructured materials with well-controlled characteristics. The applications are relevant for energy, health, environmental issues and the development of composite materials. The group also develop the up-scaling of its processes to allow their industrial transfer.

Nadia Sid
Nadia Sid

TWI Ltd Granta Park Great Abington, United Kingdom

Title of Talk: Development and Demonstration of Highly Insulating, Construction Materials from Bio-derived Aggregates

Nadia Sid

TWI Ltd Granta Park Great Abington, United Kingdom

Title of Talk:
Development and Demonstration of Highly Insulating, Construction Materials from Bio-derived Aggregates

Abstract:
The ISOBIO project will develop a new approach to insulating materials through the novel combination of existing bio-derived aggregates with low embodied carbon and with innovative binders to produce durable composite construction materials. These novel composites will target 50% lower embodied energy and CO2 at component level and 20% better insulation properties than conventional material. The project will also seek to demonstrate a reduction of at least 15% in total costs and 5% total energy spent over the lifetime of a building. ISOBIO started by identifying promising organic materials that could be used as insulation. Many of these are classified as waste or by-products of processes like food production. Finely chopped bio-materials such as hemp and straw are treated with hygrothermal resins and nano-particles that make them robust, breathable, moisture resistant, and fire retardant. The bio-aggregates are typically the result of combining organic and inorganic materials; the organic material may have natural insulating properties, for example, while the inorganic material may make the resulting bio-aggregate more robust. Combing organic materials with inorganic materials is not always easy, however. Hemp, for instance, is being combined with lime mortar but the two materials have a degree of chemical incompatibility which could result in a reduction in the strength of the composite material. To overcome this challenge, ISOBIO’s researchers are using nano-technology to increase the interfacial strength between the two materials, giving the resulting composite material improved mechanical and structural properties. The new materials not only improve upon the performance of conventional materials, they also offer new features. Hemp shiv, which is the core of the hemp stalk, for example, has a porous structure that provides moisture buffering to maintain humidity at a more constant level. While the new composite materials may provide more comfort, they need to be at least as robust as conventional materials. To make the hemp-based bio-aggregate water repellent, for example, ISOBIO’s researchers are applying hydrophobic treatments to it. The result is that water vapour can travel in and out of the material but liquid water cannot penetrate it. TWI is exploring the development of novel inorganic-organic hybrid nano-materials, to be applied as a surface treatment onto bio-based aggregates. These nanoparticles are synthesised by sol-gel processing and then functionalised with silanes to impart multifunctionality e.g. hydrophobicity, fire resistance and chemical bonding between the silica nanoparticles and the bio-based aggregates. This talk will illustrate the approach taken by TWI to design the functionalised silica nanoparticles by using a material-by-design approach. The formulation and synthesise process will be presented together with the challenges addressed by those hybrid nano-materials. The results obtained with regards to the water repellence and fire resistance will be displayed together with preliminary public results of the ISOBIO project.

Biography:

Neeraj Mishra
Neeraj Mishra

I.S.F. College of Pharmacy, India

Title of Talk: Development and characterization of Morin hydrate loaded micellar nanocarriers for the effective management of Alzheimer`s disease

Neeraj Mishra

I.S.F. College of Pharmacy, India

Title of Talk:
Development and characterization of Morin hydrate loaded micellar nanocarriers for the effective management of Alzheimer`s disease

Abstract:
The aim of this study was to prepare and characterize oral delivery of Morin hydrate loaded micellar nanocarriers using Pluronic P127 & Pluronic F123 for the effective management of Alzheimer’s disease. After administration of formulation brain and blood drug concentration were found to be highest for optimized morin hydrate loaded micellar nanocarriers as compared to plain morin hydrate. Significant (P < 0.05) reduction in assessed pharmacodynamic parameters was observed after administration of morin hydrate loaded micellar nanocarriers as compared to disease control group. Chronic treatment with morin loaded micelles significantly increased the memory in AlCl3 induced Alzheimer’s disease in wistar rats.

Biography:
Dr. Neeraj Mishra is working as Associate Professor in Department of Pharmaceutics at ISF College of Pharmacy, Moga (Punjab). He has completed his B. Pharm (2000), M. Pharm (2003) and Ph.D.(2011) in Pharmaceutical Sciences from Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Dr. H.S. Gour Central University, Sagar (M.P.). He was qualified in National Level Test GATE conducted by IIT, Kanpur in 2001. He is having around fifteen years teaching experience at post graduate and under graduate level. He is also having four years of research experience in Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Dr. H.S. Gour Central University, Sagar (M.P.). (2006-2010). He is also having one year of industry experience as production chemist in Symbiotec Pvt. Ltd., Indore (2000-2001). He was recipient of ICMR- SRF (New Delhi, India) (Grant: 45/02/2007-BMS/ PHA Dated 06\07\2007\H.S.Gour) during his Ph.D. tenure. He is having 44 International and 18 National Publication typically in recent concept of novel drug delivery system, particularly in vaccine delivery and drug targeting. He is also written 2 book chapter in national and International publisher (Nova Science Publishers). He is having membership of the Indian Pharmaceutical Association (Life Time membership MP/IND/LM/0086) and Association of Pharmaceutical Teachers of India (APTI) life membership No. is PU/LM-379. He is also guided 30 students for their M. Pharm project work. In Addition to this he is also acts as a reviewer of International repute journal (Journal of Microencapsulation (Informa Pharmaceutical Science). He has successfully organized one AICTE sponsored national seminar on “Emerging trends and applications of nanotechnology” on 11th June 2011 as Organizing secretary as organizing secretary in Swami Vivekanand College of Pharmacy, Indore (M.P.). He has also presented his research work in National and International conferences.

Uttam Kumar Sarkar
Uttam Kumar Sarkar

Department of Physics, Malda College, India

Title of Talk: SERS study of arylazo heterocycles adsorbed on silver nano particles

Uttam Kumar Sarkar

Department of Physics, Malda College, India

Title of Talk:
SERS study of arylazo heterocycles adsorbed on silver nano particles

Abstract:
Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is a surface sensitive technique that results in the enormous enhancement (by 106-1012 order) of Raman Scattering by nano structured metals —a technique that can now detect a single molecule1. The theoretical understanding of SERS, though not definite and still evolving, principally falls into two distinct concepts: (i) long range electromagnetic effect and (ii) short-range chemical effect due to charge transfer between the metal and the adsorbed molecule 2,3 Azobenzene (AB) and its derivatives are active components in various applications, such as liquid crystals, optical switching, memory storage, and photofunctional ionic liquids. Recently, it has been recognized that the photoinduced isomerisation of AB can regulate biological processes that have important implications in pharmacology, nanotechnology, and cell biology.4 Heterocyclic molecules with lone pair of electrons on their heteroatom show significant chemical interaction (chemisorption) with silver nano particles through exchange of electronic charge. The arylazo heterocycles (AAH) are N-heterocycles having two or more heteroatoms, N/O/S and a pendant azo group. Six-membered N-heterocycles being π-deficient are excellent π-acceptors while five membered N-heterocycles are much poorer π-acceptors and hence better π-donors. One of the phenyl rings in AB being replaced by heterocyclic imidazole ring, the phenylazo-imidazole is obtained and an interesting class of heterocyclic azo compounds is thus constituted. These molecules with N-heteroatom have azoimine –N==N– functional group which has interesting properties. Because of the imidazole group and the azo group metal complexes of these molecules are formed which act as a molecular switch. Interaction of these molecules with the nano structured metal surface has, thus been important to study. SERS study of silver nano particle induced dark isomerisation in aryl azo imidazoles5 and their plasmon induced and pH controlled semiconductive conformation6, manifested as “first layer effect”7-10 have further substantiated the possibility of using these AAHs as significant functional materials.

Biography:
Dr. Sarkar carried out his initial research works in the Department of Spectroscopy, IACS, Jadavpur (Kolkata), India, where Prof. C.V. Raman’s Nobel winning spectrograph is archived. He has been awarded with the University Gold Medal and Prof. S. N. Bose Memorial Medal. He published a number of research papers in journals of high impact factors and delivered invited speech in different International Conferences in India and abroad which include a speech at Stony Brook University, New York, USA. The field of his research is “Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)”. Dr. Sarkar first observed the “first layer effect” of SERS in silver sol.

Priyanka Nayar
Priyanka Nayar

Jawaharlal Nehru Aluminium Research Development and Design Centre, India

Title of Talk: Preparation of Fe nano-particles and mixed Al-Fe-Ti nano-particles from iron rich industrial rejects for value addition

Priyanka Nayar

Jawaharlal Nehru Aluminium Research Development and Design Centre, India

Title of Talk:
Preparation of Fe nano-particles and mixed Al-Fe-Ti nano-particles from iron rich industrial rejects for value addition

Abstract:
In this study, both chemical precipitation and mechanical milling techniques were used to synthesize either Fe nano-particles or mixed Fe, Al, Ti nano-composites using iron rich industry waste such as red mud as precursor. Further heat treatment of chemically and mechanically treated red mud lead to in-situ formation of nano-sized particles or composites. Such metal matrix composites have attracted much attention due to its use as structural materials in automotive and transportation industries because of their low density, high specific modulus, strength, wear and corrosion resistance. The present work used iron and titanium rich fraction of chemically treated iron rich industrial rejects for preparation of value added Fe and Fe-Al-Ti nano-material. The structural transformation behavior from bulk to nano at different temperatures has been assessed by XRD and SEM. SEM results clearly show that chemical precipitation produced Fe nano-crystals that were obtained after using Fe enriched chemically treated red mud residue whereas mixed nano-material were obtained after mechanical milling.

Biography:
Dr Priyanka Nayar received her Masters and PhD degree in Physics from Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, India in 2005 and 2014 respectively. She worked as a postdoctoral research associate in Nanjing University, China. Recently she is working as a Scientist in a research institute “Jawaharlal Nehru Aluminium Research Development and Design Centre” in Nagpur, India. Her research interests include thin film deposition, nanoparticles synthesis and characterization techniques such as GIXRD, SEM, XRF, NMR, UV-visible spectroscopy etc. Presently She is working on recycling of aluminium industrial wastes into value added products like nanocomposites. Dr. Priyanka is also the author of around 10 research papers in international journals including “Scientific Reports”, “Optical Materials”, “Vaccuum”, “Thin Solid Films” and many more.

Hana Mosbahi
Hana Mosbahi

Laboratoire de Micro-Optoélectronique et Nanostructures, Tunisia.

Title of Talk: Electrical and dielectric properties of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

Hana Mosbahi

Laboratoire de Micro-Optoélectronique et Nanostructures, Tunisia.

Title of Talk:
Electrical and dielectric properties of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

Abstract:
Aluminum gallium nitride/Gallium nitrides high electron mobility transistors are excellent candidates for next generation commercial wireless base station amplifications, high-voltages, high-power and high-temperature. These heterostructures contain spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization fields leading to the formation of an interfacial two-dimensional electron gas. These remarkable performances can be obtained by optimizing accurately the device fabrication and material growth. Particularly, with regard to device manufacture, development of high quality surface passivations significantly reduces the surface trap induced of current collapse which is a critical problem in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs and decreases the density of traps at the surfaces. In the present work reports on a study of AlGaN/GaN/Si HEMTs using impedance spectroscopy.

Biography:

Mabrouk
Mabrouk

Laboratory of Physics of Materials and Nanomaterials Applied at Environment (LaPhyMNE), Tunisia.

Title of Talk: Properties of nickel doped In2S3 thin films deposited by spray pyrolysis technique

Mabrouk

Laboratory of Physics of Materials and Nanomaterials Applied at Environment (LaPhyMNE), Tunisia.

Title of Talk:
Properties of nickel doped In2S3 thin films deposited by spray pyrolysis technique

Abstract:
In this work, nickel (Ni) doped indium sulfide (In2S3) films have been prepared by the spray pyrolysis (CSP) technique on glass substrates at 350 °C. The Ni doping level was changed with Ni:In (0, 2 and 4 % in solution). The structural studies reveal that the deposited films are polycrystalline in nature exhibiting cubic structure. The crystallite size decreases from 27.5 to 23 nm and the root mean square (RMS) roughness values increase from 13 to 18 nm. The transmission coefficient is about 70-55% in the visible region and 85-75 % in near-infrared region. The band gap energy increases with nickel content from 2.74 to 2.82 eV for direct transitions. The refractive index values of In2S3:Ni thin films decrease from 2.43 to 2.40 and the extinction coefficient values are in the range 0.01-0.20. Besides, the AC conductivity contribution is interpreted using the universal Jonscher’s power law and it is found thermally activated and it can be described by the correlated barrier-hopping models. These studies help to form significant correlation between temperature and activation energy. Nyquist plots show that the electrical response is accurately fitted by the Cole–Cole model and represented by an equivalent electrical circuit which consists of a parallel combination of a resistance and a constant phase element. From this analysis, the evidence of grain boundary conduction has been observed.

Biography:
M. Kraini received a Phd Degree in Physics in 2016 from the University of Monastir. Currently, he is a membre at the Laboratory of Physics of Materials and Nanomaterials Applied at Environment, Gabes, Tunisia. His main research interests are the synthesis and characterization of nanoparticles and thin films for a variety of applications.

Syeda Sitwat Batool
Syeda Sitwat Batool

COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Pakistan

Title of Talk: Photocatalytic properties of heterostructure TiO2 nanofibers

Syeda Sitwat Batool

COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Pakistan

Title of Talk:
Photocatalytic properties of heterostructure TiO2 nanofibers

Abstract:
TiO2 nanofibers were synthesized using electrospinning [Jamil et al Ceramics International 38 (2012) 2437–2441]. The nanofibers were polycrystalline and porous in nature having average diameter and length of ~150 nm and 200 µm, respectively. Fig. 1 (a) and (b) shows scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) image of TiO2 nanofibers, respectively. The bandgap of the nanofibers lies in optical range ˃ 3.2eV. Which showed relatively low photocatalytic degradation of toxic textile dyes (Fig. 2). To improve it photocatalytic activity we embedded Mn0.5Co0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticles into TiO2 nanofibers. Which showed improved photocatalytic activity for the degradation of toxic organic compound (Fig. 2). We are now investigating the effect of photocatalytic water splitting for hydrogen evolution. It is expected that these heterostructure nanofibers will show improve photocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution via water splitting.

Biography:
Dr. Syeda Sitwat Batool, is an Assistant Professor at COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad Pakistan at Physics department. She received her PhD Degree from PIEAS Pakistan. Dr. Batool has over 18 Publications. She has expertise in gas sensors, Photocatalytic activity, and adsorption and electron transport properties of nanomaterials. At COMSATS she is working on Photocatalysis water splitting and degradation of toxic compounds for environmental remediation.

HENRY U NWANKWO
HENRY U NWANKWO

North-West University, South Africa

Title of Talk: Plant-mediated biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles by leaf extracts of Lasienthra africanum and a study of the influence of kinetic parameters

HENRY U NWANKWO

North-West University, South Africa

Title of Talk:
Plant-mediated biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles by leaf extracts of Lasienthra africanum and a study of the influence of kinetic parameters

Abstract:
Lasienthra africanum (LA) leaf extract was employed for nano-silver synthesis. The reducing effect of the plant extract was investigated at different times, pH, temperatures and concentrations. The effect of various kinetic parameters was studied using UV–vis spectroscopy. Blue-shifted surface plasmon bands indicating smaller sized nanoparticles were obtained at neutral pH (6.8–7.0), temperature of 65◦C and concentration ratio of 1:10 (leaf extract: AgNO3) with increasing reaction times under the reaction conditions. The kinetics of the reaction followed pseudo-first- and -second-order rate equations, and was thermodynamically favoured at higher time. Spherically shaped nanoparticles were obtained at different reaction conditions.

Biography:

OLAYINKA OLUWASEUN OJO
OLAYINKA OLUWASEUN OJO

University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Title of Talk: Synthesis of Graphene Oxide under Differing Conditions and its Characterization

OLAYINKA OLUWASEUN OJO

University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Title of Talk:
Synthesis of Graphene Oxide under Differing Conditions and its Characterization

Abstract:
Carbon based graphene oxide was synthesized by a modified Hummer’s method with different ratios of graphite to sodium nitrate (NaNO3) of 1:1, 1:2, and 2:1. These variations were carried out to determine which conditions would afford more oxygen functional groups. The products obtained, namely, GO1:1, GO1:2, GO2:1, were characterized by means of powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. XRD revealed that GO2:1 is more crystalline than either GO1:1 or GO1:2, while Raman spectroscopy confirmed the in-phase vibration (G-band) of GO2:1 at 1596 nm and the disorder band (D-band) at 1347 nm. Also, TEM showed the expected layer structure of the graphene oxide sheet. FTIR revealed the presence of oxygen functional groups while the elemental analysis confirmed that GO 2:1 has more oxygen functional groups than GO1:1 and GO1:2. Thus, the synthesis of GO with a limited amount of sodium nitrate provided a more crystalline and oxygen-functionalized material.

Biography:
Olayinka Ojo obtained her M.Tech in 2015 from school of chemistry, University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria. Currently, she is pursuing her PhD degree at University of Kwazulu-natal, Durban, South Africa under the supervision of Prof. Sreekantha Jonnalagadda. Her current research interest is focused mainly on the synthesis and application of carbon-based materials.

Sessions:

Nanomedicine and Biomedical Engineering
Dajue Wang
Dajue Wang

Title of Talk: Can quantum life sciences go clinical?

Dajue Wang

Title of Talk:
Can quantum life sciences go clinical?

Abstract:
This talk is to break the myth that quantum life sciences (QLS) are not for clinicians but basic researchers only. It is NOT! Before 1950s, long bone fractures were treated with either non-surgical (conservative) or surgical method by stabilising the ends of the broken segments and make them stick and grow together. It did not work out properly because none of the devices used for the purpose stabilised the ends satisfactorily and translational movements perpendicular to the long axis of the bone ensued. The alignment of the broken segments was not normal. The translational movements beyond the margin of the cross-section of the fractured site caused bone cell to grow outside the bone margin. This is known as the callus. Such a healing process takes at least 6 weeks before the bone can bear some weight. This is known as the “secondary bone healing” through callus formation. Callus is a hard scar-like tissue that is later calcified and ossified as bone tissue. The compression plate introduced by GW Bagby in 1958 changed all this. When placed at the fracture site, it compresses the ends of the fragment segments. The fixation is so rigid that it does not allow any translational movement to take place. The compression triggers an electromagnetic effect and positive and negative ions are created. Between the ions of opposite polarity, metabolism and cell growth occur cross the cell membrane through interaction between transmitters and receptors. In this way, the healing process starts almost immediately and the fractured bone heals directly and quickly. It is coined the “primary bone healing” without ugly callus formation. Supported by the additional enormous strength of the specially designed plate, the fracture site can bear stress (compression or tension) in 2 weeks. This compression and electromagnetic effect combined is known as the Piezoelectric Effect (PE) that is an extremely important part of Quantum Mechanics (QM). PE exists wherever and whenever there are crystals that virtually exist in all cells. I prefer not to use the term Nano Medicine (NM) because nano is only about the size of the material whilst Medicine is restricted to animals. The term Quantum Live Sciences (QLS) involves a much wider scope and explains better how lives work at particle level. As it is described above, medicine has been using this method successfully for more than six decades on a daily basis but, unfortunately, most people do not realise that QM and QLS are right in front of their eyes. There is pressing need to improve our knowledge, as Stephen Hawking puts it: “QM is behind everything in life”. Where does the energy of piezoelectricity come from? It can only come from the Sun, the sole energy source in the Solar System. Herein, the QM comes into play. The next question is how it affects the organisms or living bodies in the perspective of physics. There is no better explanation by the famous Nobel Prize Laureate for Physics Richard P Feynman. It is surprisingly clever that the front cover alone of his immortal book entitled “QED – the strange theory of light and matter” supplemented with 3 graphs is sufficient to tell the audience the very basics of QM and QLS. The energy comes from the ray of bosons/photons (light) emitted by the Sun. When it hits a matter (a cell and an organism are both matters) an electron is created. If a series of electrons are created as a result of collision of multiple photons with the matter involved, electric current ensues. Our secondary school education tells us that the electricity and magnetism are inseparable twins. Hence QM and related QLS are all about electromagnetism that creates ions with resultant interaction of molecules. This is how all lives are created and evolve. Obviously, QLS are much more complex than what I have just described. It would take many years of spare-time study for a clinician to understand and absorb. Assistance from and collaboration with physicists are always helpful and in many cases necessary. Once you know the basics, the door of QLS is wide open to you. Your further efforts will definitely be rewarded with outstanding success.

Biography:
Dajue Wang was brought up in the English-speaking School, St Francis Xavier’s College in Shanghai. He achieved top in both written and spoken English. This has facilitated his reading references on international scale. He also received good results for physics that he was fascinated about. After graduation from the Harbin Medical University (formerly the Japanese Northern Manchurian Medical University), he spent most of his time as both a surgeon and a neuroscientist in the Peking University hospitals and the Neuro-surgical Institute, Beijing Xuanwu Hospital. He has also worked in 5 more other major hospitals for a short period of time. During the Cultural Revolution, he was sent to a Colliery Hospital in Gansu Province as an all-round surgeon. After the Cultural Revolution, he was sent to the University College London and Stoke Mandeville Hospital in the UK as a senior clinical and engineering researcher in 1980. After returning to China, he helped Deng Pufang (Deng Xiaoping’s son) set up China’s first rehabilitation hospital in Beijing. He went back to the UK as a visiting clinical research professor in 1991. His interest is far beyond medicine and he has been granted 4 international patents of innovation. After retirement in 2003, he began to learn Nano-technology and QM by himself. He reads attentively Feynman, Al-Khalili, Hawkings etc. As to life science, he consults Jone’s “Soft Machine”. He has delivered lectures on nanomedicine at the Peking University Third Hospital and the International Association of Neurorestoratology. They were well received.

Felismina Teixeira Coelho Moreira
Felismina Teixeira Coelho Moreira

School of Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of Porto, Portugal

Title of Talk: Development of Paper-based Colour Test-Strip for Alzheimer biomarker detection in point-of-care

Felismina Teixeira Coelho Moreira

School of Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of Porto, Portugal

Title of Talk:
Development of Paper-based Colour Test-Strip for Alzheimer biomarker detection in point-of-care

Abstract:
The present work discloses the creation of an autonomous PAPER-BASED COLOR TEST-STRIP device by integrating a biorecognition element (plastic antibody) that interacts with a biomarker associated to a neurological disorders and depression, amyloid β-42 (Aβ-42) generating a coulored signal that is visible to the naked eye. This was done by establishing suitable chemical changes upon cellulose, attributing the paper the ability to react with the peptide and to produce a colour change. This strategy is combined with molecular imprinting material (MIP) as a bio-recognition element synthesized on cellulose paper surface. We demonstrated when integrates MIP based paper test strips with conventional protein staining methods such as coomassie blue (CB) staining is enough for specific detection and quantification of Aβ-42. The biosensor shows a linear behavior between 1 ng/mL and 10 µg/mL for imprinting material and random behavior for the sensor without the template molecule (NIP). Good selectivity was observed towards protein A (100µg/mL), myoglobin (7.2 mg/mL), bovine serum albumin (1 mg/mL) and fetal bovine serum. The control of the chemical surface modifications were evaluated by FTIR analysis. The disclosed optical (bio)sensor provides an independent read-out, equipment-free, simple, low cost, long pot life and very low detection limit device used for tracking any (bio)molecule of interest, for instance, in health, environment and food safety domains.

Biography:
Felismina Moreira, is graduated in Chemical Engineering of the School of Engineering of the Polytechnique School of Porto, holds a Master degree in Chemistry and food Safety Technology of the Faculty of Science of the University of Porto, and received her PhD in Sustainable Chemistry from the Faculty of Sciences and Technology of the New University of Lisbon, Portugal. Presently, she holds postdoctoral position at BioMark Sensor Research, in the School of Engineering of the Polytechnique School of Porto in collaboration with Imperial College of London, Department of Chemistry and Institute of Biomedical Engineering. Her main research interests are devoted to the development of a) biomimetic materials applied in biomedicine and (bio)sensors, b) selective sensory surfaces applied in (bio) sensors and c) implantable hybrid devices of sensory capacity based on enzymatic biofuel cell.

Zahra Bakhtiary
Zahra Bakhtiary

Faculty of Pharmacy, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

Title of Talk: Development of a novel dry powder inhaler of erlotinib-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer

Zahra Bakhtiary

Faculty of Pharmacy, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

Title of Talk:
Development of a novel dry powder inhaler of erlotinib-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer

Abstract:
Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) having a sensitizing mutation in the endothelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, are susceptible to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Erlotinib. Erlotinib is currently the standard of care in treatment of advanced and/or metastatic NSCLC. Although Erlotinib is available as an oral tablet, to further improve its clinical benefits, local delivery of Erlotinib to the tumor(s) in the lungs can be an innovative strategy. Therefore, the aim of this study is fabrication of an Erlotinib-loaded SLN formulation for developing a dry powder inhaler (DPI) for direct delivery of Erlotinib to the lungs. Optimal compritol/poloxamer 407 SLNs were produced in sub-100 nm spherical shape and showed an encapsulation efficiency of 78.21% for Erlotinib. MTT assay and DAPI staining showed that the SLN formulation enhanced the cytotoxicity of Erlotinib in A549 model NSCLC cell line. The SLNs were successfully spray dried into microparticles (1-5 µm) with mannitol as a carrier. The powder had suitable flowability and aerodynamic behavior and could thus theoretically provide a deep inhalation pattern, as assessed by Carr' Index, Hausner ratio and Next Generation Impactor (NGI). Taken together, the fabricated SLNs can be promising candidates for improving the efficacy of Erlotinib in NSCLC treatment.

Biography:
My name is Zahra and I have received a doctorate of pharmacy (Pharm.D) degree from Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. My thesis was about « Preparation of Dry Powder Inhalation of Erlotinib-Loaded Nanolipidic Carriers and Evaluation of Its Physicochemical and Biological Characteristics”. I'm interested in developing nanoparticle based drug delivery systems for treatment of cancer.

Gabriela Martins
Gabriela Martins

Sensor Research Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Porto, Portugal

Title of Talk: Electrochemical paper-based sensor integrated with molecular imprinting towards point-of-care diagnosis

Gabriela Martins

Sensor Research Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Porto, Portugal

Title of Talk:
Electrochemical paper-based sensor integrated with molecular imprinting towards point-of-care diagnosis

Abstract:
In some kinds of cancer, oxidative stress (OS) is recognized as an early event that contributes to the disease pathology. During this phenomena, the overproduction of free radicals, such as, nitric oxide, can generate cytotoxic species responsible for causing tissue damage. Among others, 3-nitrotyrosine is obtained as a stable end-product of protein attack and has been proposed as a biomarker for diagnosis of OS1. In this context, point-of-care (POC) detection combined with early treatment therapies can reduce the disease's severity, preventing possible complications and subsequently, increasing the survival rates. By looking forward to the last trends in biosensing field, nanotechnology has given a valuable input in the design of innovative electrode-based sensors. In particular, the development of new support materials allowed the improvement of special features like, flexibility, sustainability and cost-effective2. Herein, we have designed the first paper-based biosensor pre-modified with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for the direct detection of 3-nitrotyrosine biomarker. In this work, a carbon-based sensor assembled on paper surface, previously hydrophobized, has been prepared for the determination of 3-nitrotyrosine. Firstly, cellulose paper was wax-printed followed by the manual application of the 3-electrode system composed by silver ink as the pseudo-reference electrode and carbon-based ink for both working and counter electrodes. Afterwards, a thin polymeric layer was assembled in-situ on the paper-modified electrode through electropolymerization of phenol monomer combined with the target molecule 3-nitrotyrosine. Electropolymerization of phenol was performed by Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) over the potential range +0.2 to +0.8 V in KCl (0.1 M) aqueous solution. Due to the redox behaviour of 3-nitrotyrosine, mostly on carbon-based electrodes, the detection and quantification of this biomarker was followed directly by means of voltammetric measurements. During the MIP construction, some experimental conditions, such as, the initial concentration of the monomer, the number of voltammetric cycles and the ratio template-monomer were carefully optimized and the electrochemical performance of the designed MIP sensor was investigated by CV, Square Wave Voltammetry (SWV) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). In parallel, the effect of the potential of pre-accumulation and the scan rate used for the voltammetric reading of 3-nitrotyrosine analyte was also studied. Overall, the developed electrochemical biosensor showed high sensitivity towards 3-nitrotyrosine enabling the detection of this biomarker down to Molar level. Moreover, our results showed a label-free approach coupled to a paper-modified sensing platform with good reproducibility, stability and selectivity for sensitive detection of 3-nitrotyrosine in biological samples.

Biography:
Gabriela V. Martins studied Chemistry in University of Porto and for the last 10 years has been developing scientific work as a researcher. She started with modification and characterization studies of biopolymers for biomedical applications, mostly their behavior on the interface material-biological matrix. During that time, she experienced the need to understand reaction and interaction phenomena in the nano-scale. So, she is currently a PhD student under the Doctoral Programme “Nanotechnologies and Nanoscience” and her PhD program encloses the development of new sensing devices for sustainable point-of-care platforms targeted for the detection of the most relevant biomarkers of oxidative stress in cancer disease.

Catherine Dendrinou-Samara
Catherine Dendrinou-Samara

Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

Title of Talk: Magnetic ferrite nanoparticles and colloidal superparticles candidates for theranostics

Catherine Dendrinou-Samara

Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

Title of Talk:
Magnetic ferrite nanoparticles and colloidal superparticles candidates for theranostics

Abstract:
Single-crystal inorganic magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have attracted considerable attention over the past decade for both diagnosis and therapy applications (termed as theranostics). Complex magnetic colloidal superparticles (MSPs) that consist of primary MNPs belong to the second generation of magnetic materials with improved and/or collective properties that is very important for the successful and low dosage performance of nanomaterials in medicine. We have undertaken a study1 where we focus on synthetic parameters to control the size, composition, magnetization and hydrophilicity/ hydrophobicity of coated ferrite MNPs, MFe2O4 (where M=Mn, Co, Ni) in an attempt to enforce their performance in bio applications. Specifically, the MNPs designed as fluorescence agents, anti-inflammatory drug carriers, magnetic fluid hyperthermia heat mediators and negative contrast agents for MRI. For the preparation the solvothermal method has been selected as a simple and eco-friendly route providing products that exhibit high crystallinity, even for sizes under 10nm. Shifting from the synthesis of individual MNPs to their assembly into secondary structures, MSPs of the same and/or different building blocks were prepared. Multi-responsive water-soluble graft copolymers were used to serve as a multifunctional polymeric platform for the encapsulation and transfer in aqueous media of hydrophobic MNPs by encapsulation into the hydrophobic cores of the micellar structures of copolymers that also prepared by us. Magnetic hyperthermia study and MRI measurements proved that the materials could be promising candidates for relevant theranostic treatments. Moreover, by combining magnetic and non-magnetic features of NPs, heterostructures of different ratios such as NiFe2O4@Cu2O have been synthesized with antifungal and magnetomechanical properties.

Biography:
Dr. Catherine Dendrinou-Samara is Professor and Director of Inorganic Chemistry Lab., Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki, GREECE. She obtained her PhD thesis in 1992 from Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki while she was visiting Researcher at Inorganic Chemistry Lab of Freie Universitaet Berlin and The Manchester University, UK. Her research interest are on synthesis and characterization of a variety of inorganic compounds and materials ranging from mononuclear complexes to polynuclear one and farther to nanoscale particles that permits to investigate magnetic properties and biomedical applications. She works on controlled synthesis through wet chemical approach of magnetic spinel ferrite nanoparticles for Imaging Diagnostics (MRI) and Therapeutics (Drug carriers, Hyperthermia); Bioactivity of Cu-based nanoparticles and Bimettallic nanostructures. She has an h-index of 30 for 80 indexed publications, with >2600 citations(Scopus).

Jamboor Vishwanatha
Jamboor Vishwanatha

Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, UNT Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX

Title of Talk: Bone Microenvironment Targeted Nanoparticles for Metastatic Prostate Cancer Treatment

Jamboor Vishwanatha

Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, UNT Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX

Title of Talk:
Bone Microenvironment Targeted Nanoparticles for Metastatic Prostate Cancer Treatment

Abstract:
Purpose The most common site of metastatic prostate cancer is the bone. These metastatic lesions are difficult to treat and often result in off target cytotoxicity from current chemotherapeutics. We hypothesize that targeted nanoparticles (NPs) designed to deliver chemotherapeutics to cancer lesions in the bone microenvironment could improve treatment and the side effect profile that results from non-discriminate action of cytotoxic agents. We have designed a novel targeted nanotherapeutic system to target the bone microenvironment in an effort to more efficiently deliver chemotherapeutics to the site of metastasis. The core of the NPs are composed of poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) biodegradable polymer. The PLGA NPs have been loaded with the microtubule inhibitor, cabazitaxel. The surface of the NP has been conjugated with an amino-bisphosphonate through a BS3 (bis(sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate) linker system, which allows for high affinity binding to the hydroxyapatite structure of the bone. Materials & Methods: NPs were formulated using a modified water-in oil-in-water double emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The physiochemical properties of the NPs were characterized. Ex vivo bone binding studies were performed. Cytotoxicity was tested in C4-2B and PC3 cell lines as well as in 3D tumor spheroids. Finally, NPs were tested for efficacy in an intraosseous tumor model of metastatic prostate cancer in athymic nude male mice. Results: NPs were made with favorable physiochemical characteristics: mean hydrodynamic diameter of 236.8 nm ± S.D. 1.19 and mean polydispersity of 0.121 ± SEM 0.003. Cellular cytoxicity assay showed that C4-2B cells were more sensitive to the free cabazitaxel, the non-targeted NPs, and the targeted NPs compared to PC-3 cells. We did not see an appreciable difference between the targeted NPs and equivalent treatment of free cabazitaxel in 3D assays. In vivo analysis showed that both the non-targeted and targeted NPs were more effective than free cabazitaxel at reducing tumor burden. Additionally, targeted-NPs improved bone morphology at tumor lesions and were superior in behavioral tests. Conclusions: In this project we have engineered a bone targeted NP formulation for metastatic prostate cancer. We have determined the chemical and physical characteristics of this system and tested the in vitro cytotoxicity. Finally, we have shown the efficacy of these targeted NPs in an intraosseous model of bone metastatic prostate cancer.

Biography:
Dr. Vishwanatha is a Regents Professor and Vice President, and Founding Director of the Texas Center for Health Disparities at the University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth. He is a principal investigator of the National Research Mentoring Network, a NIH Common Fund initiative to provide mentorship, networking and professional development for a diversified biomedical and behavioral workforce. He is also a principal investigator of the NIH Specialized Center of Excellence in Health Disparities. Dr. Vishwanatha received his Ph.D. in biological sciences from the University of South Carolina in 1983. Dr. Vishwanatha’s research is in cancer molecular biology, experimental therapeutics and nanotechnology. His laboratory is investigating genetic markers that predict development of aggressive prostate and breast cancers, and nanotechnology-based therapies for breast and prostate cancers. His research is funded by NIH, DOD and other agencies. Dr. Vishwanatha is actively involved in mentorship and networking programs to diversify the biomedical research workforce, and has mentored numerous undergraduate and graduate students from under represented groups in biomedical sciences. As the founding director of the Texas Center for Health Disparities, a Specialized Center of Excellence funded by the National Institutes of Health, he has directed health disparity research, education and community outreach programs. For the past 12 years, he has organized the annual Texas Conference on Health Disparities that attract national speakers and participants. He serves on the external advisory committees for University of Puerto Rico-Cayey, PR; St. Mary’s University, San Antonio, Texas; Alabama State University, Montgomery, Alabama; and Savannah State University, Savannah, Georgia. He has been an active member of the AAMC GREAT Group, SACNAS and ABRCMS.

Catherine Dendrinou-Samara
Catherine Dendrinou-Samara

Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece

Title of Talk: Magnetic ferrite nanoparticles and colloidal superparticles candidates for theranostics

Catherine Dendrinou-Samara

Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece

Title of Talk:
Magnetic ferrite nanoparticles and colloidal superparticles candidates for theranostics

Abstract:
Single-crystal inorganic magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have attracted considerable attention over the past decade for both diagnosis and therapy applications (termed as theranostics). Complex magnetic colloidal superparticles (MSPs) that consist of primary MNPs belong to the second generation of magnetic materials with improved and/or collective properties that is very important for the successful and low dosage performance of nanomaterials in medicine. We have undertaken a study1 where we focus on synthetic parameters to control the size, composition, magnetization and hydrophilicity/ hydrophobicity of coated ferrite MNPs, MFe2O4 (where M=Mn, Co, Ni) in an attempt to enforce their performance in bio applications. Specifically, the MNPs designed as fluorescence agents, anti-inflammatory drug carriers, magnetic fluid hyperthermia heat mediators and negative contrast agents for MRI. For the preparation the solvothermal method has been selected as a simple and eco-friendly route providing products that exhibit high crystallinity, even for sizes under 10nm. Shifting from the synthesis of individual MNPs to their assembly into secondary structures, MSPs of the same and/or different building blocks were prepared. Multi-responsive water-soluble graft copolymers were used to serve as a multifunctional polymeric platform for the encapsulation and transfer in aqueous media of hydrophobic MNPs by encapsulation into the hydrophobic cores of the micellar structures of copolymers that also prepared by us. Magnetic hyperthermia study and MRI measurements proved that the materials could be promising candidates for relevant theranostic treatments. Moreover, by combining magnetic and non-magnetic features of NPs, heterostructures of different ratios such as NiFe2O4@Cu2O have been synthesized with antifungal and magnetomechanical properties.

Biography:

Nana Zhao
Nana Zhao

Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 China

Title of Talk: Rational design and functionalization of multifunctional nanoparticles for cancer therapy Nana Zhao, Fu-Jian Xu

Nana Zhao

Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 China

Title of Talk:
Rational design and functionalization of multifunctional nanoparticles for cancer therapy Nana Zhao, Fu-Jian Xu

Abstract:
Organic/inorganic nanohybrids with favorable physical and chemical properties constructed form suitable surface functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with superior polycations are promising candidates as carriers with multi-functions. The morphology (size and shape) of NPs are considered to have an intense influence on their interaction with cells and biological systems, while the effect of morphology on gene carriers are poorly understood. We developed several facile strategies to construct organic/inorganic nanohybrids of polycations and inorganic nanoparticles. Grafting-from, grafting onto and host-guest interactions were all utilized for the fabrication of nanohybrids [1]. Furthermore, we employed SiO2 and Au NPs as model systems to investigate the morphology effect. A series of novel gene carriers based on polycation-functionalized SiO2 and Au NPs with different morphologies were designed and synthesized, including nanospheres, nano-octahedras, nanorods, arrow-headed nanorods and chiral nanorods, et al [2]. The morphology of both SiO2 and Au NPs is demonstrated to play an important role in gene transfection [3]. Based on the results, star-shaped hollow silica carriers with photothermal gold caps were synthesized for the co-delivery of drugs and genes [4]. One dimensional nanohybrids of polycations and iron oxide or quantum dots were also designed and satisfying therapeutic effects were achieved [5,6]. In addition, magnetic resonance (MR) or fluorescence imaing could be realized in the same nanostructure. Therefore, combing the intriguing properties of inorganic parts, the carriers could integrate the functions of imaging and be employed for theranostic platforms. These results may provide new avenues to develop promising carriers and useful information for the application of NPs in biomedical areas.

Biography:
Prof. Nana Zhao obtained her B. S. in Applied Chemistry in 2003 from Shandong University, and Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry in 2008 from Peking University. From 2008 to 2010, she worked as a Postdoc Fellow in Department of Polymer and Material Chemistry at the University of Toronto, Canada. After another two years’ post-doctoral work in Division of Materials Science at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, she joined Beijing University of Chemical Technology in 2012. She has published over 20 publications in well-known international journals such as Chem. Soc. Rev., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., Nano Lett., and Adv. Mater. et al. Prof. Zhao has her expertise in strategic design, controlled synthesis, and biomedical applications of organic/inorganic nanohybrids, including diagnosis of diseases, gene delivery, controlled drug-release, and imaging. Integrating the control over morphology, surface functionalization, and self-assembly strategies, the performance of nanohybrids could be improved further.

Mohammed J Al-Awady
Mohammed J Al-Awady

The Green University of Qasim, Babylon, Iraq.

Title of Talk: Novel Microgel as a Carrier for Topical Application of Vancomycin in Infected Wound Healing

Mohammed J Al-Awady

The Green University of Qasim, Babylon, Iraq.

Title of Talk:
Novel Microgel as a Carrier for Topical Application of Vancomycin in Infected Wound Healing

Abstract:
In an attempt to reach better treatment of skin infections. Vancomycin (VC) was loaded in newly developed aqueous carbopol microgel (MG) to get sustained release of drug according to swelling and deswelling study at different pH as shown in Figure 1. Measurement of particle size & zeta potential of (MG) and vancomycin loaded microgel (VMG) at different pH and different (VC) concentrations, Drug-Microgel compatibility studies and encapsulation efficiency were confirmed by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), FTIR, and UV-visible spectrophotometer, respectively. Gel formulations containing Vancomycin loaded microgel were also prepared. This method could be considered as a promising step for the development of pharmaceutical and biomedical applications.

Biography:

Harshani Perera
Harshani Perera

Sabaragamuwa University of Sri Lanka, INDIA

Title of Talk: SYNTHESIS OF EUROPIUM DOPED HYDROXYAPATITE NANOPARTICLES FOR CELL LABELING

Harshani Perera

Sabaragamuwa University of Sri Lanka, INDIA

Title of Talk:
SYNTHESIS OF EUROPIUM DOPED HYDROXYAPATITE NANOPARTICLES FOR CELL LABELING

Abstract:
Hydroxyapatite (HAP) as the primary inorganic component of bone and teeth is demonstrated to be an excellent candidate for biomedical applications because of its biocompatibility, biodegradability, and bioactivity. HAP can be used as the host of luminescent rare earth (RE) ions and the obtained RE-HAP nanoparticles can be used for cell labeling and medical diagnostics. Herein, the Eu3+ ions doped HAP nanoparticles (HAPnps) were synthesized by ultrasound irradiation assisted co-precipitation method. The effects of Eu3+ doping content and reaction temperature on phase composition, crystal size, crystallinity and luminescent properties of Eu-HAP were investigated. The potential application of Eu-HAPnps as cell labels was evaluated for Bel-7402 human liver cancer cells. Due to the incorporation of Eu3+ in HAP lattice, crystal size in length becomes shorter than pure HAPnps. It is because interfering of crystallization process by Eu3+ ions. The luminescence effectiveness could be enhanced by increasing reaction temperature, but on the other hand higher reaction temperature leads to a little higher particle size. By rising reaction temperature and Eu3+ doping content the luminescence intensity of Eu-HAPnps can be enhanced. In addition, experimental results of XRD patterns and FT-IR spectra display the characteristics of crystalline HAP, suggesting that the Eu3+ labeling does not change the crystalline phase composition. But the crystallinity degree and crystallite size of Eu-HAPnps are increased along with the increase of reaction temperature. Therefore, the preferable Eu doping content was identified as 2% and reaction temperature was identified as 800C for obtaining high luminescent Eu-HAPnps. Furthermore, the cell proliferation experiment of Bel-7402 was not significantly inhibited by Eu(2%)-HAPnps (0.1 mM) during 3 days.

Biography:
Ms.T.S. Harshani Perera is a lecturer at the Faculty of Applied Sciences in Sabaragamuwa University of Sri Lanka. After the completion of her BSc degree in Applied Sciences at Sabaragamuwa University of Sri Lanka, she earned her Biomedical Engineering Master degree from the State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing of the Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, P.R. China. Her dissertation is on Preparation and Surface Modification of Europium Doping Hydroxyapatite Luminescent Nanoparticles for Cell Labeling. Her main area of research is application of rare earth doped bioapatite nanoparticles for cell labeling.

Staffan Schantz
Staffan Schantz

Pharmaceutical Development, Sweden

Title of Talk: Characterization of nanoparticles for drug delivery using new NMR methods

Staffan Schantz

Pharmaceutical Development, Sweden

Title of Talk:
Characterization of nanoparticles for drug delivery using new NMR methods

Abstract:
A challenge in medicine today is the ability to deliver drugs to specific targets, for example, to inhibit cancer cells without damaging the surrounding healthy tissues or to target specific organs as in cardiac regeneration. Cell membranes are mostly composed of lipid bilayers, and their hydrophobic nature protects the cells from hydrophilic molecules in the extracellular matrix. To achieve cellular internalization of hydrophilic bioactive molecules, many carrier-mediated delivery systems have been proposed. There is currently much interest in the development of lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) for drug delivery of ribonucleic acids, e.g. small interfering (siRNA) and messenger (mRNA). However, LNPs are complex entities self-assembled from multiple components of different natures and many questions remain regarding their structure. For example, it is still debated how encapsulated molecules, such as siRNA, are distributed inside an LNP or the structural organization of the different lipids. We evaluate here the use of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-NMR technique for the study of siRNA/LNP and mRNA/LNP formulations. We show that by studying the DNP enhancement as a function of polarization time we are able to determine the architectures of the LNPs and compare with existing structural models. In particular the various chemical components of the LNPs are well resolved in the NMR spectra and we can establish their relative positions with respect to the LNP surface. Based on the results we propose a new structural model for the LNPs which features a homogeneous core with a tendency for layering of DSPC (a phospholipid) and DMPE-PEG (a surfactant) at the surface. Finally, we apply this methodology to a related drug delivery system, nanocrystals with an adsorbed PEG-based surfactant, to evaluate conformation and surface layer thickness.

Biography:
Dr. Staffan Schantz is Associate Principal Scientist (Materials Science) in AstraZeneca and Associate Professor at Chalmers University of Technology (Gothenburg, Sweden). With 20 years of experience as a scientific leader in drug development he has received a series of AstraZeneca awards including the ‘Scientist of the Year’ Global Medicines Development prize 2014 and he is inventor of several patents and co-author of more than 40 publications.

Sessions:

Nanomedical Approaches for Cancer Diagnosis
Adelaide Greco
Adelaide Greco

University of Naples Federico II, Italy

Title of Talk: Preclinical Imaging for a Theranostic Approach using Engineered Nanoparticles in mice models of lymphoma.

Adelaide Greco

University of Naples Federico II, Italy

Title of Talk:
Preclinical Imaging for a Theranostic Approach using Engineered Nanoparticles in mice models of lymphoma.

Abstract:
Nanoparticles (Np) are used in a wide range of biomedical applications, overall in cancer theranostic field. Hyaluronic acid (HA)-based nanoparticles (NPs) have numerous active groups that make them ideal as tumor-targeted carriers. The Np combined with peptides, allows an efficient in vivo targeting useful to improve drug delivery and clinical outcome. We report the in vivo targeting of aggressive A20 murine B-cell lymphoma by idiotype-specific peptide pA20-36 (Pep) using fluorescence molecular tomographic (FMT) imaging and ex vivo Magnetic Resonance in a xenograft mouse models of lymphoma A20. After that we evaluated the in vitro and vivo therapeutic efficiency of Pep-NPs versus an ad hoc control molecule. Methods: Females Balb/c nu/nu mice (n=44) of 8 weeks old, were studied. Thirtysix mice were subcutaneously injected with 5 x 106 with A20 cell line, while 8 mice were not injected with any cell (ctrl). All mice since cell injection were fed with specific food to minimize the level of intestinal autofluorescence. After 12 days, all mice were divided into 4 groups divided for intravenously injection: the first, Pep-NPs, (n = 12) receives 100 µL of a NPs suspension containing 4 nmol of ATTO680 and decorated with A20-36 peptide, the second, CNT-NPs, (n = 12) receives 100 µL of injected with 100 µl of a NPs suspension containing 4 nmol of ATTO680 decorated with the scrambled peptide, the third, Control, (n = 12) injected with 100 µl of unloaded, non-decorated NPs, the fourth group of Negative Control non-tumor-bearing, were injected with 100 µl of a NPs suspension containing 4 nmol of ATTO680 and decorated with A20-36 peptide. All NPs contained Gd-DTPA. Excitation detection channel was 680 nm for all studies. All procedures are performed under general anesthesia (isoflurane 4% and oxygen 1 L/min). Imaging was performed at 1, 2, 4, 6, 24 h post injection, using the FMT 4000TM fluorescence tomography in vivo imaging system (PerkinElmer, Waltham, MA), which collected both 2D surface fluorescence reflectance images as well as 3D FMT imaging datasets. At the end of the FMT study animals were sacrificed, tumors were surgically removed, and were evenly allocated to an ex vivo FMT followed by confocal microscopy, and ex vivo MRI. High Frequency Ultrasound was used to monitor the tumor growth/tumor reduction in mouse models subjected to therapy. Results: Mice injected with Pep-NPs, showed peak fluorescence at 3h post injection, but at subsequent time points the fluorescence decreases up to 0 at 24h. The fluorescence reflectance signal (FIS% ) was significantly higher (P=0.0001) with Pep-NPs (98.5 ± 46.1) compared to both pCNT-NPs (8.4 ± 1.9) and control mice (7.1 ± 1.7). Even if not significantly, the FlS% of Pep-NPs was always higher than that of the other two groups. For Pep-NPs loaded with Gd-DTPA, ex vivo MRI showed a signal intensity of 175.1 ± 15.8, which was significantly higher than the signal detected for both pCNT-NPs (85.5 ± 7.9) and controls with non-decorated and unloaded NPs (57.9 ± 10.1) (P<0.0001). The latter two groups were not significantly different. Ex vivo confocal microscopy confirmed these data. Finally, the pA20-36-NPs (P<0.0001) and pA20-36 (P=0.02) treated mice had smaller tumors compared with the pCNT and pCNT-NPs treated mice after the first week of treatment (23.1 ± 9.2 vs. 66.5 ± 15.6 vs. 119.9 ± 13.1 vs. 127.1 ± 45.7 mm3, respectively). Conclusion: We demonstrated the ability of NPs loaded with fluorescent and paramagnetic tracers to act as multimodal imaging contrast agents and hence as a non-toxic, highly specific theranostic system. We set up a new imaging system for non invasive diagnosis of B cell Lymphoma and therapy in mice.

Biography:
Professor Greco has more than 15 years of experience in the field of Preclinical Imaging applied to the diagnosis and therapy of mice models of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. She has got her PhD in the Veterinary University of Naples Federico II where she learned the principles of Radiology in small animal practice. She worked as invited researcher at Marshall University, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology & Department of Surgery, and Translational Genomic Research Institute Laboratories, Edwards Cancer Center, Huntington, WV, testing nanosystems for drug delivery and therapy in mice models of cancer. Actually she is Professor at the Medical School of Naples Federico II where she worked ad PI in a preclinical Imaging Laboratory hosted at Ceinge Biotecnologie Avanzate, scarl Napoli, italy.

RD Ralandinliu Kahmei
RD Ralandinliu Kahmei

National Institute of Technology Nagaland, India

Title of Talk: Comparative study on the heating efficiency of CTAB coated superparamagnetic MnFe2O4, NiFe2O4 and ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles for Hyperthermia application

RD Ralandinliu Kahmei

National Institute of Technology Nagaland, India

Title of Talk:
Comparative study on the heating efficiency of CTAB coated superparamagnetic MnFe2O4, NiFe2O4 and ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles for Hyperthermia application

Abstract:
CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) coated manganese ferrite (MnFe2O4), nickel ferrite (NiFe2O4) and zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4) nanoparticles with crystallite sizes of 23 nm, 15 nm, and 28 nm respectively were successfully synthesized by a facile co-precipitation method. The presence of CTAB on the surface of the nanoparticles was confirmed by the Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Fourier Transform-Infrared spectrum (FT-IR). The magnetic study shows a high saturation magnetization of 46 emu/g (MnFe2O4), 59 emu/g (NiFe2O4) and 55 emu/g (ZnFe2O4) which indicates the Fe-O-Fe super-exchange interaction driven by the synergistic influence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy and cation distribution. The Field Cooling (FC) and Zero Field Cooling (ZFC) curves confirmed the superparamagnetic nature of all the samples. The induction heating study elucidates the efficiency of heat generation (>42°C) in all samples showing an exceptionally high specific absorption rate (SAR) of 480 Wg-1, 684 Wg-1, 586 Wg-1 at 2 mg/ml in which CTAB-NiFe2O4 nanoparticles shows the highest efficiency. This is attributed to the co-dependent factors: size, saturation magnetization and Neelian relaxation loss mechanism. This comparative study discussed on the collaborative influences of structural motifs and magnetic properties that engendered the effectiveness of heat generation making it viable for hyperthermia application.

Biography:

BingQiu
BingQiu

Heilongjiang Provincial Hospital, Harbin, 150036, P.R. China

Title of Talk: The mechanisms research of pine needle oil-induced DNA damage pathway in HepG2 human hepatic cancer cell line.

BingQiu

Heilongjiang Provincial Hospital, Harbin, 150036, P.R. China

Title of Talk:
The mechanisms research of pine needle oil-induced DNA damage pathway in HepG2 human hepatic cancer cell line.

Abstract:
In last decades, inducing DNA damage of cancer cells by natural medicines has become a research hotspot in the field of cancer treatment. We explore the mechanisms of pine needle oil-induced DNA damage pathway in HepG2 human hepatic cancer cell line in this study.We used the methods as follows: 1.Flow cytometry:The HepG2 cells were treated with pine needle oil or DMSO at different concentrations.The cells were fixed with 70% ice-cold alcohol. Afterwards, HepG2 cells were stained with PI (50 μg/L) . Subsequently, the percentages of cells at different phases of the cell cycle were analyzed by flow cytometry with 488 nm wavelength utilized in the measurement.2.Western blot:HepG2 cells, treated with pine needle oil or DMSO, were collected at a density of 2×106 cells/mL followed by protein extraction by using protein extraction solution kit. The samples were then loaded into SDS-PAGE for electrophoresis and the proteins were transferred onto the polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane, followed by blocking the membrane with TTBS containing 5% BSA. Subsequently, the membrane was incubated with primary antibody overnight at 4 °C and the PVDF membrane was washed three times with TBST (TBS containing 0.1% Tween-20) before incubating with secondary antibody (1:1000) at room temperature for 1h. After incubation, the membrane was washed and developed with ECL method.3.Immunofluorescence staining:Cells were treated ,then were fixed with pre-chilled (-20 °C) acetone-methanol for 15 min. The first and second anti-γH2AX antibody (0.5 μg/mL) was added onto the slides and incubated . The cells were then mounted with anti-fade reagent containing DAPI. A fluorescent microscope was use to image the samples. We found:1.Pine needle oil facilitated the G2/M arrest of HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. 2.G2/M arrest was induced by pine needle oil through activating ATM pathway in the HepG2 cells. 3.γ-H2AX was strikingly upregulated in the nuclei in a dose-dependent manner after treatment with pine needle oil.Therefore, we can draw conclusions:Pine needle oil induces G2/M arrest in HepG2 cells by facilitating ATM activation.

Biography:
Bing Qiu, PhD, Chief Physician.E-mali:bingqiu07@163.com. I have been working as a doctor at the department of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy center of Heilongjiang Province Hospital in China since 2002. I Studied in Japanese Kochi Medical University in 2000 and at Japanese Asahi general hospital in 2014,respectively.In addition, I went to study at KUMC of America in 2016.In recent years,I have been engaged with scienitific researches associated with the chronicity of HBV infection with lots of achievements.

Sessions:

Carbon nanomaterials, devices and technologies
Olga Glukhova
Olga Glukhova

Saratov State University, Russia

Title of Talk: Novel hybrid carbon nanomaterials for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries

Olga Glukhova

Saratov State University, Russia

Title of Talk:
Novel hybrid carbon nanomaterials for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries

Abstract:
At present, the lithium-ion batteries are the main type of technology used to store energy. The main task on the way of wide use of the batteries of this class is to increase their specific and volumetric energy densities, charging speed, stability in operation. In this regard, the choice of the material for electrodes of the ion-lithium batteries is an actual scientific problem. With the development of the nanoindustry, the production of ion-lithium batteries was improved along with the technology for synthesis of nanomaterials. This led to the emergence of a new direction - ion-lithium batteries based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), including CNTs decorated with nanoparticles of metal oxides of the MnO2/SnO2/Al2O3 type [1-2]. According to experts [3], ion-lithium batteries on CNTs occupy a central place in the field of energy saving, since they possess a number of advantages, in particular ecological safety of used nanomaterials, the ability to increase the efficiency of energy storage through the functionalization and improvement of nanomaterials based on CNTs, the ability to maintain electrophysical properties in homogeneous and heterogeneous deformations. At the moment, a new and extremely promising branch of the development of ion-lithium batteries is a battery class using a nanomaterial based on gamma-Fe2O3 (maghemite) nanoparticles as a negative electrode. The large reserves of iron in Earth's crust, its nontoxicity, make this material an ideal candidate for industrial use from an ecological and economic point of view. The compounds of gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles with CNTs predict an increase in the capacity of the ion-lithium batteries, an increase in the discharge/charge kinetics and electrical conductivity. In addition, developed technology of single-stage synthesis of CNTs with gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles inside and on the surface of the tubes [4] allows us to obtain this material in a macro volume, which predetermines its economic benefits for the manufacture of ion-lithium batteries in comparison with others. We developed a prototype of a new class of highly efficient flexible lithium-ion batteries with a negative electrode based on CNT/gamma-Fe2O3 nanomaterial, which is carbon nanotubes decorated with iron (III) oxide gamma-phase nanoparticles. Using the Density Functional based Tight Binding (DFTB) method and the Non-equilibrium Green function method (NEGF) carried out a series of numerical experiments in order to reveal structural and electrophysical properties of CNT/gamma-Fe2O3 nanomaterial. During the investigation we study a mechanism of contact of gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles with carbon nanotubes. The enthalpy of formation and binding energy were calculated for considered CNT/gamma-Fe2O3 nanomaterial. The electronic transfer between a gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticle and a nanotube was considered for the first time. We found the effect of a gamma-Fe2O3 on the conductive properties of CNT, depending on the particle size and the chirality of CNTs. Also we study the effect of deformations on the electrical conductivity of CNTs decorated with gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles.

Biography:
O.E. Glukhova, Doctor of science in physics and mathematics, now is a head of Department of Radiotechnique and electrodynamics at Saratov State University and leads the Division of Mathematical modeling in Educational and scientific institution of nanostructures and biosystems at Saratov State University. She received her DSc degree in solid state electronics and nanoelectronics from Saratov State University in 2009. Her main fields of investigation are: nanoelectronics, molecular modeling of biomaterials and nanostructures, molecular electronics, mechanics of nanostructures, quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics, carbon nanostructures (fullerenes, nanotubes, graphene, graphane). She has published about 170 peer-reviewed journal papers and four monographs.

Francisco Jose Maldonado
Francisco Jose Maldonado

University of Granada., Spain

Title of Talk: Carbon Nanogels and Nanocomposites for catalytic applications

Francisco Jose Maldonado

University of Granada., Spain

Title of Talk:
Carbon Nanogels and Nanocomposites for catalytic applications

Abstract:
In recent years, there is an increasing interest on obtaining nanocarbon materials for advanced applications. Between them, carbon gels are a relatively new type of carbons materials first prepared by Pekala [1]. They present additional advantages regarding other carbon materials as purity, homogeneity and a nanometric control of morphology, porosity and surface chemistry. In such a basis, carbon gels are considered as nanocarbons materials with hierarchical porosity [3,4]. They improve the characteristic versatility of classical carbon materials in catalysis based on a very flexible sol-gel synthesis method that permits the combination of a large number of variables. There are four critical steps in the synthesis with many variables: preparation of the initial solution (monomers, concentration, catalyst, pH, etc), polymerization and curing (mould type and dimension, temperature program), drying (supercritical, subcritical or cryogenic drying) and finally, carbonization and/or activation (temperature, time, activating agents, etc). Nevertheless, fitting carefully these variables, materials with specific properties can be designed in a wide range of porous and chemical characteristics. They can be prepared in powder, grains, pellets, films, monoliths or coatings of ceramic structures fitting composition from pure carbon materials to carbon functionalized with heteroatoms, carbon – inorganic oxides composites or metal-doped carbon gels and porosity ranging from macro to microporous materials. Their porosity and surface chemistry can be fitted either by fitting the polymerization conditions or as post-synthesis treatments. In this work different series of catalysts based on carbon gels and composites were prepared, exhaustively characterized by different techniques (textural, chemical, structural and mechanical properties are analyzed) and applied in environmental catalyzed processes (air and water treatments), energetic or fine chemistry synthesis of valuable products. The correlation of the parameters of synthesis, physicochemical properties and catalytic performance is presented, looking for the interactions and synergism between phases.

Biography:
Francisco José Maldonado Hódar is Professor at the University of Granada, Spain, Department of Inorganic Chemistry. Doctor in Chemistry from 1993 by this University his research interest is focused in the areas of Carbon Materials and Heterogeneous Catalysis, developing materials with fitted physicochemical properties to be used as adsorbent, molecular sieves and mainly as heterogeneous catalysts, in processes that involve the environment protection, clean energy or fine chemistry. He is coauthor of more than 100 highly cited manuscript, different book chapters and patents.

REMO MERIJS MERI
REMO MERIJS MERI

Riga Technical University , Latvia

Title of Talk: Fabrication and characterization of thermal, electrical and mechanical properties of ethylene-octene copolymer composites with functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes

REMO MERIJS MERI

Riga Technical University , Latvia

Title of Talk:
Fabrication and characterization of thermal, electrical and mechanical properties of ethylene-octene copolymer composites with functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes

Abstract:
Modification of polymers with carbon nanotubes allows development of advanced materials for structural, transportation, energetics, electronics and other sectors of national economy. Improvement of exploitation behaviour of carbon nanotubes reinforced polymer composites depends on multiple factors including intrinsic properties of the nanofiller and the chosen matrix material, purposeful tailoring of their interface during manufacturing by prior functionalization of the nanofiller and/or by using customized manufacturing approaches. In the current research various nanocomposite compositions, based on thermoplastic polyolefine copolymer and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), have been obtained via customized master batch approach. Two different ethylene-octene copolymers with distinct 1-octene content (EOC-17 and EOC-30, respectively) have been used to determine the effect of thermoplastic matrix on the structure and properties of the investigated nanocomposites at different MWCNT contents (from 0,2 to 15 wt.%). The nanocomposites have been characterized in respects to their structural, calorimetric, thermogravimetric, elastic and dielectric properties by using appropriate techniques (TEM, FTIR, Raman, TGA, DMTA, DES). Results of the analysis testify that increment of MWCNTs content in the both EOC matrices leads to considerable improvement of elastic, thermogravimetric and electric properties of the nanocomposites already at low nanofiller contents. Although, absolute values of storage modulus of the EOC17 based nanocomposites are considerably higher than in the case of the corresponding EOC30 based nanocomposites, relative MWCNTs reinforcing effect is greater in the latter case due to differences in crystallinity degrees of both polymer matrices. It is also interesting to note that electrical conductivities of less crystalline EOC30 based nanocomposites are greater than those for corresponding EOC17 based systems, most probably due to the facilitated development of conductive MWCNTs network within the electrically insulating polymer matrix. Meanwhile, type of EOC has no considerable effect on thermogravimetric relationships of the investigated nanocomposites neither in air nor inert environment.

Biography:
Professor and Head of the Department of Polymer Materials Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Applied Technology, Riga Technical University; Leading Researcher in RTU Institute of Polymer Materials; Researcher in RTU Polymer Testing laboratory; Member of the Experts Commission “Engineering sciences and Computer science” of the Latvian Council of Science; Member of the Editorial Board of scientific journal „Environmental Research, Engineering and Management”; More than 20 SCOPUS publications in last 6 years.

Jānis Zicāns
Jānis Zicāns

Riga Technical University , Latvia.

Title of Talk: Fabrication and characterization of thermal, electrical and mechanical properties of ethylene-octene copolymer composites with functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes

Jānis Zicāns

Riga Technical University , Latvia.

Title of Talk:
Fabrication and characterization of thermal, electrical and mechanical properties of ethylene-octene copolymer composites with functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes

Abstract:
Modification of polymers with carbon nanotubes allows development of advanced materials for structural, transportation, energetics, electronics and other sectors of national economy. Improvement of exploitation behaviour of carbon nanotubes reinforced polymer composites depends on multiple factors including intrinsic properties of the nanofiller and the chosen matrix material, purposeful tailoring of their interface during manufacturing by prior functionalization of the nanofiller and/or by using customized manufacturing approaches. In the current research various nanocomposite compositions, based on thermoplastic polyolefine copolymer and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), have been obtained via customized master batch approach. Two different ethylene-octene copolymers with distinct 1-octene content (EOC-17 and EOC-30, respectively) have been used to determine the effect of thermoplastic matrix on the structure and properties of the investigated nanocomposites at different MWCNT contents (from 0,2 to 15 wt.%). The nanocomposites have been characterized in respects to their structural, calorimetric, thermogravimetric, elastic and dielectric properties by using appropriate techniques (TEM, FTIR, Raman, TGA, DMTA, DES). Results of the analysis testify that increment of MWCNTs content in the both EOC matrices leads to considerable improvement of elastic, thermogravimetric and electric properties of the nanocomposites already at low nanofiller contents. Although, absolute values of storage modulus of the EOC17 based nanocomposites are considerably higher than in the case of the corresponding EOC30 based nanocomposites, relative MWCNTs reinforcing effect is greater in the latter case due to differences in crystallinity degrees of both polymer matrices. It is also interesting to note that electrical conductivities of less crystalline EOC30 based nanocomposites are greater than those for corresponding EOC17 based systems, most probably due to the facilitated development of conductive MWCNTs network within the electrically insulating polymer matrix. Meanwhile, type of EOC has no considerable effect on thermogravimetric relationships of the investigated nanocomposites neither in air nor inert environment.

Biography:
Professor and Head of the Department of Polymer Materials Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Applied Technology, Riga Technical University; Leading Researcher in RTU Institute of Polymer Materials; Researcher in RTU Polymer Testing laboratory; Member of the Experts Commission “Engineering sciences and Computer science” of the Latvian Council of Science; Member of the Editorial Board of scientific journal „Environmental Research, Engineering and Management”; More than 20 SCOPUS publications in last 6 years.

Baliram Lone
Baliram Lone

Vinayakrao Patil Mahavidyalaya Vaijapur, India

Title of Talk: Investigation of Interaction of DNA nucleobases on Single Wall carbon Nanotubes: A DFT approach

Baliram Lone

Vinayakrao Patil Mahavidyalaya Vaijapur, India

Title of Talk:
Investigation of Interaction of DNA nucleobases on Single Wall carbon Nanotubes: A DFT approach

Abstract:
We reported quantum calculation using density functional theory (DFT) on DNA bases-functionalized Zigzag (9,0) and armchair (4,4) single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Local distortions with similar band structures of functionalized semiconducting (9,0) and metallic (4,4) SWNTs were investigated. It confirms that due to sidewall functionalization on SWNTs local atomic structural distortion can change drastically the electronic structures of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), which lead to an enhance band structure.

Biography:
Prof/Dr.Baliram Lone has received his Ph.D. in Physics from Dr.Babasaheb Ambedkar University Marathwada University, Aurangabad, during the period of 2002 to 2007. He received prestigious YOUNG SCIENTIST AWARD in 2009 from Department of Science & Technology, New Delhi, India., University Grants Commission (UGC), New Delhi awarded Raman Postdoctoral fellowship during 2013-14 to visit Utah State University ,Logan, Utah State U.S.A., He successfully completed his postdoctoral studies from to department of chemistry & Biochemistry Utah State University, Logan, Utah State, United States of America., Currently, he is working as Head & Assistant professor in department of Physics, Vinayakrao Patil Mahavidyalaya Vaijapur, affiliated to Dr.Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India; He has successfully completed his Administrative responsibilities as Head & Principal investigator of major projects funded by UGC, DST agencies. He is research guide in Physics since January 23, 2016.

Sessions:

Nanobiotechnology
Roberto Grau
Roberto Grau

Universidad Nacional de Rosario./ Argentina.

Title of Talk: Metal nanoparticles as a novel and safe strategy to fight pathogenic spores and antibiotic-resistant microbial biofilms.

Roberto Grau

Universidad Nacional de Rosario./ Argentina.

Title of Talk:
Metal nanoparticles as a novel and safe strategy to fight pathogenic spores and antibiotic-resistant microbial biofilms.

Abstract:
Biofilms are three-dimensional structures that contains billions of genetically identical bacteria submerged in a self-produced extracellular matrix, which protect bacteria from antibiotics and the human immunological defenses. More than 85 % of chronic and/or recurrent human infections are linked to bacterial biofilms. In addition, spore-forming pathogenic bacteria represent an additional community threat because of their intrinsic refractory behavior against antibiotics, phagocytes and their easy utilization in bioterrorist attacks. Therefore, every day the available microbicide arsenal against biofilms and spores becomes scarcer. Accordingly, nano-material biotechnology emerges as a promising alternative for reducing the detrimental effects of microbial-related diseases. Here we describe the development of novel nanostructured coating systems with improved photocatalytic and antibacterial activities. These systems comprise, in one case, layers of SiO2 followed by layers of mesoporous or dense TiO2-anatase, and doping with silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs). In the other case, we developed Copper NPs and its oxides by a chemical method based on a bottom up approach and its stabilization using aminosilanes as surface modifiers. The activity of CuNPs and AgNPs (MNPs) was measured against spores and vegetative (planktonic and sessile) forms of the relevant human pathogens Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (etiological agent of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome), Listeria monocytogenes (etiological agent of septic abortion), Bacillus anthracis (etiological agent of Anthrax), Clostridium perfringens (etiological agent of food-associated diarrhea and Gas Gangrene), cystic-fibrosis related Pseudomona aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ( etiological agent of sepsis and myocardiopathies). The planktonic and sessile growth (measured as the final cellular yield at 600 nm and crystal violet staining, respectively) of each pathogen, as well as the sporocide effect on C. perfringens and B. anthracis spores, was very significant at submillimolar concentrations of MNPs (95 % of vegetative growth inhibition and sporocide effect, p < 0.01). The anti-biofilm effect against the bacterial pathogens was exerted at genetic level as revealed by the downregulated expression produced by the MNPs on transcriptional β-galactosidase and gfp-fluorescence reporter fusions to genes involved in extracellular matrix synthesis. MNP-treatment of pre-formed biofilms dramatically accelerated their dissembling and cellular death without dispersal cell formation. Interestingly, the emergency of MNP-resistant bacterial cells after ten-days of treatment with sub-MIC concentrations of the microbicide was significantly lower (p < 0.01) than the emerged resistance after bacterial treatment with commonly-used available antibiotics. The importance of the MNP treatment adoption as a safe alternative for reducing and preventing pathogen bioburden is discussed.

Biography:
Roberto Grau completed his PhD from Rosario National University in Argentina and obtained his postdoctoral studies from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), Department of Experimental Medicine at San Diego, California, USA. He is a Pew Latin American Fellow (San Francisco, USA), a Fulbright International Scholar (WashigntonDC, USA) and the director of the Molecular Microbiology and Environmental Science Laboratory of the National Council of Scientific Research of Argentina (CONICET). Roberto obtained many national and international awards, published more than 30 papers in reputed journals, formed more than seventy profesionals in science and founded and/or catalyzed the creation of half-dozen biotechnological companies.

Edouard alphandery
Edouard alphandery

Sorbonne Universités, UPMC, University Paris 06,France.

Title of Talk: Full disappearance of intracranial malignant U87-Luc glioma in mice by controlled endotoxin release from chains of magnetosomes exposed to an alternating magnetic field.

Edouard alphandery

Sorbonne Universités, UPMC, University Paris 06,France.

Title of Talk:
Full disappearance of intracranial malignant U87-Luc glioma in mice by controlled endotoxin release from chains of magnetosomes exposed to an alternating magnetic field.

Abstract:
The administration of nanoparticles to tumors followed by alternating magnetic field application was shown to efficiently destroy tumors both preclinically and clinically, especially glioma. However, antitumor efficacy remains suboptimal and requires further improvements. We therefore developed a new type of nanoparticles synthesized by magnetotactic bacteria called magnetosomes. Due to their chain arrangement that leads to uniform distribution, ferrimagnetic properties that enhance their heating power and to a controlled release of endotoxins that attract polynuclearneutrophiles, we show that chains of magnetosomes achieve full destruction of intracranial U87-Luc glioma tumors under AMF application in 40% of treated mice using a rather low quantity of magnetosomes administered of 13 µg of magnetosomes per mm3 of tumor. By contrast, under the same treatment conditions, signs of antitumor activity are not observed with chemically synthesized nanoparticles currently used in the magnetic hyperthermia treatment of tumors. It also appears that full glioma destruction is achieved when magnetosomes occupy only 10% of the whole tumor volume, which suggests the involvement of an indirect mechanism of tumor destruction, which is desired for the treatment of infiltrating tumors, such as glioma, for which whole tumor coverage by nanoparticles can hardly be achieved.

Biography:
Edouard Alphandéry has completed his PhD at the age of 27 years from Oxford University and postdoctoral studies from Trinity College and the University of washington. He is assistant professor at the University Paris 6. He has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and submitted 10 patent families.

Michael G. Schrlau
Michael G. Schrlau

Rochester Institute of Technology, USA

Title of Talk: Nanotextured Surfaces for Enhanced Gene Transfer

Michael G. Schrlau

Rochester Institute of Technology, USA

Title of Talk:
Nanotextured Surfaces for Enhanced Gene Transfer

Abstract:
Introducing nucleic acids into mammalian cells is a crucial step to elucidate biochemical pathways, and to modify gene expression and cellular development in immortalized cells, primary cells, and stem cells. Current transfection technologies are time consuming and limited by the size of genetic cargo, the inefficient introduction of test molecules into large populations of target cells, and the cytotoxicity of the techniques. We have developed a novel method of introducing genes and biomolecules into tens of thousands of mammalian cells through an array of aligned hollow carbon nanotubes, manufactured by template-based nanofabrication processes, to achieve rapid high efficiency transfer with low cytotoxicity. The utilization of carbon nanotube arrays for gene transfection overcomes molecular weight limits of current technologies and can be adapted to deliver drugs or proteins in addition to nucleic acids. The template-based nanofabrication processes used to manufacture carbon nanotube-based arrays and recent gene transfection applications will be described, concluding with recent findings suggesting that the length of the exposed nanotubes has an effect on transfection efficiencies.

Biography:
Dr. Michael Schrlau is an Associate Professor and Graduate Director in Mechanical Engineering at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) where his research team creates nanodevices for intracellular delivery and biosensing. Michael’s government funded research has been featured in several journals including Nanotechnology and ACS Nano and has resulted in several patents. Dr. Schrlau earned his BS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Pittsburgh in 1998 and his PhD in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania in 2009. Dr. Schrlau was a Research Assistant Professor in Materials Science and Engineering at Drexel University before joining RIT in 2011.

Radwa
Radwa

University of Leeds, Leeds, UK

Title of Talk: Nanoscale Characterisation of Liposome loaded Microbubbles for targeted drug delivery

Radwa

University of Leeds, Leeds, UK

Title of Talk:
Nanoscale Characterisation of Liposome loaded Microbubbles for targeted drug delivery

Abstract:
Microbubbles (MBs) are a phospholipid monolayer encapsulating a perfluorocarbon gas core and are used as contrast agents for ultrasound imaging. Conjugates of phospholipid bilayer vesicles (liposomes) and gas filled MBs have evolved as an exciting route for targeted drug delivery by using ultrasound to rupture the MB and thereby release the drug at the required location. Both the MBs and the attached liposomes require specific physical and structural properties to sustain these functions. MBs should be of high concentration, long lifetime and exhibit a strong echogenic response to the US. On the other hand the lipid vesicles need to have a high drug encapsulation capacity, high binding affinity with the MBs, and have minimal leakage of the encapsulated drug. We have fabricated in-house microfluidic MBs with a variety of lipid shell compositions and gas cores to tune the microbubble lifetime with their application. Lipid vesicles encapsulating toxic drugs and drug mimicking dyes are attached to the MBs by a novel technique and their potential delivery dose estimated. MBs have been produced at high concentrations > 109 MBs / mL. Their lifetime was determined in vitro under physiological conditions that resembles the in vivo environment. The MBs displayed lifetimes of ~4hrs in vitro, and ~20 min in vivo, which was significantly? longer than commercially available MB preparations tested. The frequency response of MBs to US mainly depends on the mechanical properties of the lipid shell which can be investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). We present force spectroscopy measurements with tip-less cantilevers on MBs, to characterize the shell stiffness for different shell architectures under a range of solution conditions.

Biography:
Dr. Abou-Saleh graduated from Mansoura University, Egypt in 1998 with BSc in Biophysics. Following completion of my masters in Medical Physics (2000), I moved to University of Leeds in 2005 and joined the Molecular and Nanoscale Physics (MNP) group to do my PhD research in the biophysics of blood clotting. In 2010 I was so excited by the idea of using Microbubbles (MBs) to cure cancers and started my first post-doctoral position with the MB group. With more than 8 years of experience, I have expertise in liposomal drug encapsulation and delivery, microbubbles, microscopy and spectroscopy as well as material and biological science.

Sessions:

Graphene Technologies
T.Theivasanthi
T.Theivasanthi

International Research Center, Kalasalingam University, India.

Title of Talk: Graphene and Nanomaterials

T.Theivasanthi

International Research Center, Kalasalingam University, India.

Title of Talk:
Graphene and Nanomaterials

Abstract:
Science & technology have opened many avenues for nanotechnology in fields such as agriculture, biotechnology, environment, medicine, energy, electrical & electronics, automobiles, mechanical, constructions, information & communications, space etc. This reveals that the nanotechnology provides solutions to the problems arising in these fields. This technology will dominate all the applications oriented fields in coming decades. Nanomaterials are surface enhanced materials have more active sites and can produce more actions. Metal nanoparticles like copper, silver, lead nanopowders and their metallurgical, mechanical, tribological properties are explored in this work. Various Technologies / advanced Materials like low cost / mass production of Graphene, polymers, synthesis, characterizations of metal nanopowders, metal oxide nanopowders, nanofluids, polymer-metal nano-composites and their applications will be explored. Large surface area, high surface‐area‐to‐volume ratio and compatibility with flexible substrates of these materials make them as unique candidate for various applications. Smart materials are changing their properties, in a controlled manner, under the influence of external stimuli. Nanotechnology Enabled Smart Materials are useful in nanosensors and chemical sensors. This work also explains about smart materials, nanomaterials and their applications in various fields including industries (like nanofluids, heat transfer, solar panels, and sensors), biotechnology, biomedical etc. Recent, innovative superparamagnetic plants materials, nano-bio materials and their applications will be discussed. In addition, “Research Motivation” lecture will be presented to motivate students/ researchers.

Biography:
Dr. (Ms) T.Theivasanthi of Kalasalingam University doing research in nanomaterials / nanotechnology; has 14 years of teaching experience; published many research articles/ books and h-index 9; they have been downloaded more than 10000 times; life member of Indian Science Congress Association and Magnetics Society of India; serving as Editorial Board Member/ reviewer for some scientific journals; Lead Editor for the Special Issue on “Advanced Nanomaterial for various Applications” of the Journal of Nanomaterials, Nanoengineering and Nanosystems (SAGE Publications); achieved many awards/ honours/ recognitions including - Madurai Women Achievers Award - 2013, Motivational Award - 2015 and 2015 Women’s Day Award of St.Annes College; achieved World Record in LIMCA Book of Records-2015 for nanotechnology invention “World’s first superparamagnetic plants materials” – named “Santhi Particles”, World Record– 2016 for innovative products "The World’s lowest priced graphene" & "World’s Smallest Particles of Vegetables" and World Record– 2017 for the invention "The World’s Smallest Anti-Viral Plant Particles", other innovative products- Superparamagnetic lead nanoparticles, semiconducting lead Nanoparticles, Low cost-mass production of graphene, agricultural nanofertilisers, vegetable powder for diabetes, plants materials for diabetes & psoriasis and nanoparticles for treatment of EBOLA, DENGUE, HIV & H1N1 virus infection. Govt. of India shows interests to develop her inventions for the benefits of public; she has been invited to deliver lectures (more than 105) in International / National scientific conferences, foreign countries (China, Malaysia, Sri Lanka & Greece) and renowned institutes like National Institute of Technology, Anna University, Central University of all over India; she delivered Motivational Lectures for women, students and staff of institutes / Multi-national corporate companies (Cognizant Technologies); Artha Nyana Academy (Malaysia), ISOM (Malaysia) etc. Economic Times and Telegraph have published news about her research; Thanthi TV, All India Radio, Minnal FM (Malaysia) and Bernama TV (Malaysia) have broadcasted her interviews.

Paolo Bondavalli
Paolo Bondavalli

Multi-functional Material Lab, GTM department Thales Research and Technology, 91120 Palaiseau, France

Title of Talk: Graphene based supercapacitors: results and perspectives

Paolo Bondavalli

Multi-functional Material Lab, GTM department Thales Research and Technology, 91120 Palaiseau, France

Title of Talk:
Graphene based supercapacitors: results and perspectives

Abstract:
Supercapacitors are electrochemical energy storage devices that combine the high energy-storage-capability of conventional batteries with the high power-delivery-capability of conventional capacitors. In this contribution we will show the results of our group recently obtained on supercapacitors with electrodes obtained using mixtures of carbonaceous nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphite, graphene, oxidised graphene). The electrode fabrication has been performed using a new dynamic spray-gun based deposition process set-up at Thales Research and Technology (patented). First, we systematically studied the effect of the relative concentrations of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) and graphite on the energy and power density. We obtained a power increase of a factor 2.5 compared to barely MWCNTs based electrodes for a mixture composed by 75% of graphite. This effect is related with the improvement of the mesoporous distribution of the composites and to the increase of the conductance as pointes out by Coleman et al. After these results, we decided to test water as a solvent in order to reduce the heating temperature and to obtain a green type process without toxic solvents. To achieve stable suspensions we oxidised the graphene and the CNTs before putting them in water. We observed that changing the Graphene Oxide concentrations we obtained different value of capacitance and energy. The best results were obtained with 90% of GO and 10% of CNTs. We obtained 120F/g and a power of 30kW/Kg. The importance of these results is that it is the first time that these performances have been obtained for graphene related materials using an industrial fabrication suitable technique that can be implemented in roll-to-roll production. In this way we were able to fabricate stable suspensions in less than one hour compared to three days using NMP. All these results demonstrate the strong potential to obtaining high performance devices using an industrially suitable fabrication technique. Finally, new results using mixtures of Carbon nanofibers and graphene will be shown. These new composite allow to use ionic liquid as electrolytes and so to increase dramatically the energy stored in the device without reducing the power.

Biography:
Dr. Paolo Bondavalli, Msc, PhD, Hdr is in charge of the transversal topic on nanomaterials at Thales Research and Technology and he is a member of the Nanocarb Lab. His research has principally dealt with carbon nanotubes gas sensors and silicon nanowires for biological detection. In the last two years, he is the first author of several scientific papers (see refs in project) dealing with CNTFET based sensors, supercapacitors and of 6 patents dealing with gas sensors, thermal management through CNTs, nanomaterials deposition, supercapacitors and memristor-like structures. Presently his work is focused on the development of new materials (e.g. graphene, cnts, nanowires) for the new generation of electronics devices and for energy storage applications and memristor. Dr Bondavalli has received his Hdr in 2011, at Paris-Sud on a work on “devices based on random network of carbon nanotubes”. He is EU expert, and Vice-Chairman, for Marie Curie Fellowships (EIF, IIF, OIF, CIG, IRSES), NMP and ICT panel, for the French National Research Agency (ANR), EDA, Eureka and reviewer for IOP, ACS, IEEE, ECS, Elsevier, EPJ B, Bentham, Taylor & Francis... During the last five years, he has participated, also as coordinator, in several EU projects (concerning MEMS, MOEMS, CNTs, graphene, spintronics) and ANR projects. He is involved in the Graphene Flagship initiative.

Ana María
Ana María

Title of Talk: Oriented 200 Cu2O nanoplatelets supported on few layers graphene as efficient visible light photocatalyst for overall water splitting

Ana María

Title of Talk:
Oriented 200 Cu2O nanoplatelets supported on few layers graphene as efficient visible light photocatalyst for overall water splitting

Abstract:
There is much current interest in the use of solar light for the generation of hydrogen from water. Most of the systems reported so far use a sacrificial electron donor that cannot be employed in real applications. The efficiencies of hydrogen generation in the absence of any sacrificial agent resulting in the simultaneous generation of hydrogen and oxygen in the corresponding stoichiometry is considerably more difficult. In this presentation, I will present data showing the photocatalytic properties of oriented Cu2O nanoplatelets (3-5 nm thick, 20-40 nm lateral dimensions) strongly grafted on graphene is a highly efficient photocatalyst for this process.1 The oriented Cu2O nanoplatelets on graphene are obtained by pyrolysis at 900 ºC under Ar of chitosan containing Cu2+ salts. The ability of chitosan to adsorb large concentrations of transition metal salts and to be a precursor of graphene materials is of crucial importance in the preparation of this highly active photocatalyst and responsible for its properties.

Biography:

Li GUO
Li GUO

China Academy of Engineering Physics, People’s Republic of China.

Title of Talk: Improved NO2 Gas Sensing Properties of Graphene Oxide Reduced by Tow-beam-laser Interference

Li GUO

China Academy of Engineering Physics, People’s Republic of China.

Title of Talk:
Improved NO2 Gas Sensing Properties of Graphene Oxide Reduced by Tow-beam-laser Interference

Abstract:
We report on the fabrication of a NO2 gas sensor from room-temperature reduction of graphene oxide(GO) via two-beam-laser interference (TBLI). The method of TBLI gives the distribution of periodic dissociation energies for oxygen functional groups, which are capable to reduce the graphene oxide to hierarchical graphene nanostructures, which holds great promise for gaseous molecular adsorption. The fabricated reduced graphene oxide(RGO) sensor enhanced sensing response in NO2 and accelerated response/recovery rates. It is seen that, for 20 ppm NO2, the response (Ra/Rg) of the sensor based on RGO hierarchical nanostructures is 1.27, which is higher than that of GO (1.05) and thermal reduced RGO (1.03). The response time and recovery time of the sensor based on laser reduced RGO are 10 s and 7 s, which are much shorter than that of GO (34 s and 45 s) and thermal reduced RGO (38s and 50s), indicating that the sensing performances for NO2 sensor at room temperature have been enhanced by introduction of nanostructures. This mask-free and large-area approach to the production of hierarchical graphene micro-nanostructures, could lead to the implementation of future graphene-based sensors.

Biography:
Li Guo was born in Liaoning, China in 1985. She received her B.S. in microelectronics (2008) and Ph.D. in micro and solid electronics (2013) from Jilin University. Since 2008, she started a continuous academic project involving master and doctor study under the guidance of Prof. H.-B. Sun in the State Key Laboratory of Integrated Optoelectronics, Jilin University. After received her Ph.D, she joined in Institute of Materials, China Academy of Engineering Physics. Her research is focused on the micro-nanofabrication of graphene-based materials by laser.

Mohamed A Antar
Mohamed A Antar

King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia

Title of Talk: Diffusion Study of Magnesium Sulfate ions for reduced Graphene oxide based membrane

Mohamed A Antar

King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia

Title of Talk:
Diffusion Study of Magnesium Sulfate ions for reduced Graphene oxide based membrane

Abstract:
One of the main applications of nanofiltration is in the pretreatment stage of seawater desalination. Nanofiltration has high rejection rate for divalent ions, and thus has the potential of eliminating the scaling ions, which pose serious fouling problems in seawater desalination. Graphene oxide (GO) ion rejection is limited by the interlayer spacing between GO layers. This interlayer spacing can be controlled by using reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The main objective is to develop a membrane composed of Polyethersulfone as a support coated with Graphene oxide to eliminate divalent ions. The Graphene oxide membranes were prepared by spin coating technique then reduced by subjecting the membrane to hydrogen iodide vapor. The effect of deposition method, GO concentration, polyelectrolyte, coating method, number of layers and reduction time are investigated. A diffusion study of Magnesium Sulfate ions was applied to investigate the effect of HI solution temperature and GO reduction time on the membrane selectivity as well as to estimate the interlayer spacing.

Biography:

Sessions:

Applications of Nanotechnology
Rajiv Prakash
Rajiv Prakash

Banaras Hindu University, India

Title of Talk: Prostate Specific Antigen Aptasensor: Label free cancer detection over graphene quantum dots-Au nanorods hybrid modified platform

Rajiv Prakash

Banaras Hindu University, India

Title of Talk:
Prostate Specific Antigen Aptasensor: Label free cancer detection over graphene quantum dots-Au nanorods hybrid modified platform

Abstract:
Sensitive and label free detection of Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) is still a challenge in prostate cancer diagnosis. Recently we have developed a label-free PSA aptasensor based on graphene quantum dots-gold nanorods (GQDs-AuNRs) modified screen printed electrodes. GQDs-AuNRs hybrid provides excellent platform for immobilization of PSA specific aptamers and further electrochemical sensing of PSA. For the first time multi-detection of PSA is demonstrated using three techniques simultaneously, viz. cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Under optimum conditions, sensor shows reproducible results with limit of detection (LOD) of 0.14 ngmL-1. Aptasensor is also demonstrated in real samples with satisfactory results.

Biography:
Rajiv Prakash is professor and coordinator of the School of Materials Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi, India. He has been recipients of Young Scientist (Council of Science and Technology), Young Engineer Awards (INAE) of India and Materials Society Medal Award of India. His current research interests include synthesis of morphology controlled organic conducting polymers, nanocomposites, fabrication and characterization of organic electronic devices and sensors/biosensors. He is having more than 150 publications in international journals of repute and 17 patents in his credit. He is in Editorial Board of several National and International Journals. He is member of various national committees including DST-TIFAC for India Vision 2035 and MHRD “IMPRINT” program.

Fredy Alberto Reyes Lizcano
Fredy Alberto Reyes Lizcano

EcoleNationaleSuperieure de Mecanique, France

Title of Talk: Mechanical performance of HMA-2 modified with purified and unpurified carbon nanotubes and nanofibers

Fredy Alberto Reyes Lizcano

EcoleNationaleSuperieure de Mecanique, France

Title of Talk:
Mechanical performance of HMA-2 modified with purified and unpurified carbon nanotubes and nanofibers

Abstract:
The present study evaluates the mechanical performance of a Hot Mix Asphalt – Type II (HMA-2) modified with carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers (CNTF). CNTF were made by means the Catalytic Vapor Deposition (CVD) technique at 700° C using a Nickel, Copper and Aluminum (NiCuAl) catalyst with a Cu/Ni molar relation of 0,33. In order to properly assess HMA-2 performance, three different mixtures were analyzed: 1) HMA-2 modified with purified CNTF; 2) HMA-2 modified with non-purified CNTF and, 3) a Conventional HMA-2 (control). Samples manufactured in accordance with the Marshall Mix Design were tested in the laboratory to study rutting, resilient modulus (Mr) and fatigue. In addition to the aforementioned dynamic characterization, the effect of CNTF purification on the asphalt mixture’s mechanical properties was analyzed. In short, a comparative study was designed to determine whether or not CNTF should be purified before introduction into the HMA-2. This investigation responds to the growing demand for economical materials capable of withstanding traffic loads while simultaneously enhancing pavement durability and mechanical properties. Although purified CNTF increased HMA-2 stiffness and elastic modulus, non-purified CNTF increased the asphalt mixture’s elastic modulus without considerable increases in stiffness. Thus, the latter modification is deemed to help address fatiguerelated issues and improve the long-term durability of flexible pavements.

Biography:

Sessions:

NANO ELECTRONICS
Sergey G.Lebedev
Sergey G.Lebedev

Title of Talk: Phonon Resonators

Sergey G.Lebedev

Title of Talk:
Phonon Resonators

Abstract:
The nanocrystallite has the finite number of the oscillation modes. Their number increases proportionally to a cube of the characteristic size. Thus the oscillation spectrum of nanocrystal becomes discrete, and the separate modes of oscillations do not interact with each other, that considerably strengthen all phonon modulated processes in a crystal. Covering of such a nanocrystallite with the shielding surface of a material with the higher nuclear weight will allow creating the phonon resonators whose oscillation modes will represent the standing waves and, will be amplified by the resonant manner. The composites made of phonon resonators will allow producing a perspective functional material for the electronics with adjustable structure and properties. Some new mechanism of HTS based on phonon resonators is proposed.

Biography:
Sergey G.Lebedev was born in 1956 in the sity of Kursk, Russia. Dr. Sergey G.Lebedev has graduated from the Moscow Physical Engineering Institute, 1980. In 1983 S.G.Lebedev has graduated from Dept. of Mathematics of the Lomonosov Moscow State University. Since 1980 up to now he has worked at the Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences. In 1990 S.G.Lebedev has obtained his PhD. Dr. Lebedev is the author of 150 scientific articles. He is a member of International Nuclear Target Development Society. The whole point of his life is in science and his whole life devoted to science. The prime interests of S.G.Lebedev are in the fields of point radiation defects and superconductivity. Now he occupied the position of Senior Scientist, Head of research team.

Florian von Wrochem
Florian von Wrochem

Sony Europe Ltd., Hedelfinger str. 61, Stuttgart.

Title of Talk: Nanoelectronics based on ultra-robust metal-terpyridine oligomer complexes and on optical molecular switches

Florian von Wrochem

Sony Europe Ltd., Hedelfinger str. 61, Stuttgart.

Title of Talk:
Nanoelectronics based on ultra-robust metal-terpyridine oligomer complexes and on optical molecular switches

Abstract:
The driving force in molecular electronics within the past decades has been to shift organic-based thin-film devices from basic research to the application level. In this talk, a few strategies toward the realization of organic electronic devices on the basis of ultrathin functional organic layers are outlined, specifically by leveraging on the self-assembly process at interfaces. In the first place, we show how large area molecular junctions of outstanding robustness can be realized using densely packed molecular metal-terpyridine complex oligomers, which might enable a versatile platform for functional optoelectronic layers.1 In the second part, a new class of self-assembled monolayers2 exhibiting a pronounced intrinsic dipole moment is presented, by which the injection properties in organic semiconductors can be tuned in view of in solar cell and organic memory applications.3 Finally, as an example for biomolecular photoconductors, Sn-cyt c protein layers are shown to act as reversible photo-electrochemical switches upon integration into large area solid state junctions.

Biography:
Dr. Florian von Wrochem is principal scientist and project leader at the Materials Science Laboratory of the Sony corporate labs (Stuttgart, Germany). He received his Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Basel in 2007 in parallel with his R&D activities at the Sony Europe. The research in his group is addressing the development of novel organic and molecular electronic devices, e.g. memories and logic circuits for flexible electronics. These activities involve the fabrication and electrical characterization of organic opto-electronic devices at the nano and micro scale, the spectroscopic and topographic investigation of surfaces and interfaces, as well as the design and synthesis of functional materials