Program Schedule

View session wise speaker sessions below. Click on the respective day to view sessions on that particular day.

Note: The shedule of speakers and their order of talks are subject to changes.

Keynote Speaker

Alexander Bagaturyants

(1) Photochemistry Center RAS Federal State Institution "Federal research center Crystallography and Photonics Russian Academy of Science" (FRC Crystallography and Photonics RAS) ul. Novatorov 7a, Moscow, 119421 Russia

Title of Talk: Theoretical Modeling in Organic Nanophotonics

Alexander Bagaturyants

(1) Photochemistry Center RAS Federal State Institution "Federal research center Crystallography and Photonics Russian Academy of Science" (FRC Crystallography and Photonics RAS) ul. Novatorov 7a, Moscow, 119421 Russia

Title of Talk:
Theoretical Modeling in Organic Nanophotonics

Abstract:
Functional organic materials are widely used in photonics applications such as light-emitting devices (OLEDs), photovoltaic devices (solar cells), and optical chemical sensors. The development of new promising materials with good charge-transport characteristics, good energy-transfer properties, good emission properties, and high thermal and photo stability is a very important problem. Theoretical prediction of these properties and characteristics makes it possible to select materials with the best properties. In our work multiscale atomistic simulation methods are applied to studying excited molecules in organic materials and their interaction with neighboring molecules. Such interactions can lead to the formation of excimers and/or exciplexes. The formation of exciplexes at the interface between layers of organic molecules in multilayer structures, typical for organic light-emitting diodes and for other devices of organic electronics and photonics, makes an important contribution to their emission spectrum. Studying such interactions and resulting complexes is of great interest for photonics of organic materials. The application of theoretical methods of atomistic simulation to the prediction of properties of molecules in excited states is especially justified, because a direct experimental investigation of properties of molecules in excited states poses great difficulties. Our work is concentrated on the development of adequate models of a complex system containing excited components, the selection of most reliable methods and approaches for the calculation of such molecular systems taking into account the near and long-range environment, and the development of suitable methods for the description of charge and/or excitation transfer. These following steps are briefly discussed: (1) the construction and use of the library of parameters of the EFP (Effective Fragment Potentials) approximation for the simulation of environment of luminescent dopants and transport molecules in the layers; (2) the estimation of the accuracy of the obtained results; (3) the creation of a program complex for the construction of the polarized environment using the library of parameters in the EFP approximation; (4) the investigation of the effect of the polarized environment on the positions of triplet and singlet levels of luminescent dopants; (5) the development and improvement of approaches to the calculation and interpretation of absorption spectra of supramolecular systems using hybrid QM/MM methods; (6) studying the formation of exciplexes forming at the interface between two organic semiconducting layers by molecular dynamics and the calculation of their properties by quantum chemical methods; (7) selection and development of force fields for metal-organic complexes, molecular dynamics simulation of such system using these force fields; (8) the development and improvement of the computational approach based on multiconfigurational quantum-chemical calculations of radiative and intersystem crossing constants; (9) studying spin-mixed states of phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes, the calculation of radiative phosphorescence constants, and analysis of channels of nonradiative phosphorescence quenching.

Biography:
Alexander Bagaturyants is chief researcher at Photochemistry Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences. He was graduated from D.I. Mendeleev Institute of Chemical Technology, Moscow, Russia in 1962, obtained his PhD degree, Dr. Sci. degree, and the academic title of professor in 1968, 1987, and 1992, respectively, all in physical chemistry. His main research interests are in the field of atomistic multiscale simulations of organic functional materials, quantum chemistry, quantum-chemical calculations of excited states in molecules and molecular complexes. Alexander Bagaturyants is the author of more than 200 research papers and two monographs.

Keynote Speaker

JOSE ANGEL DE TORO SANCHEZ

Instituto Regional de Investigación Científica Aplicada (IRICA) and Departamento de Física Aplicada Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, E-13071 Ciudad Real, Spain

Title of Talk: Dense assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles: characterization and applications

JOSE ANGEL DE TORO SANCHEZ

Instituto Regional de Investigación Científica Aplicada (IRICA) and Departamento de Física Aplicada Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, E-13071 Ciudad Real, Spain

Title of Talk:
Dense assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles: characterization and applications

Abstract:
Magnetic nanoparticles attract great interest due to their ever-increasing range of applications, including data storage, permanent magnets, catalysis, microwave absorption and optics, and more recently, a variety of uses in biomedicine, both for diagnosis (MRI contrast, magnetic particle imaging) and therapy (magnetic hyperthermia and drug delivery), i.e. in theranostics [1]. In order to reach high efficiencies, most of the above applications necessarily rely on relative dense ensembles of magnetic nanoparticles, where (at least) dipolar interactions, and the corresponding demagnetizing field, become inevitably important. However, the effects of such interparticle (or intergrain) interactions are not yet fully understood, as they sometimes lead to complex collective behavior driven by magnetic frustration. In fact, there is a lack of robust analysis methods to even quantify the strength of interparticle interactions. A review of such methods is presented, highlighting our recent findings on arguably the most popular of them, namely the Henkel plots, which have been consistently shown by experiment and Monte Carlo simulations to be sensitive not only to interparticle interactions, as customarily assumed, but also to the subtle surface disorder frequently exhibited by oxide nanoparticles (ubiquitous in the mentioned applications).

Biography:
Jose A. De Toro obtained his Physics M.S. at U. Autónoma de Madrid (1997) and his Ph.D. (2002) at Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, where he is currently an associate professor. He was a postdoc Marie Curie fellow at the University of Liverpool (2004) and visiting professor at the University of Cagliari (2016). His main research line focuses on magnetic nanoparticles, with studies on topics such as the collective behavior of dense assemblies or exchange-bias effects in core-shell structured bi-magnetic particles. He has been invited to speak in APS and ICFPM conferences, among others. He is the chairman of a symposium on the substitution of critical raw materials in the coming E-MRS Spring Meeting (2018).

Sessions:

Nanomaterials
Cecile Reynaud
Cecile Reynaud

Université Paris-Saclay, CEA Saclay, France

Title of Talk: Growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on aluminum foils

Cecile Reynaud

Université Paris-Saclay, CEA Saclay, France

Title of Talk:
Growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on aluminum foils

Abstract:
Forests of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are attractive nanomaterials because of their unique structural, electrical and thermal properties. However, many applications require their growth on metallic substrates. Catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) is the best method to grow them but the catalytic particles can diffuse rapidly into the metal subsurface and thus become inactive. In this communication, I will address this issue through the recent results obtained in our laboratory. I will show how it is possible to grow VACNT on carbon fibers [1], stainless steel and aluminum surfaces by a single-step process, namely the aerosol assisted CCVD, where the catalyst and carbon precursors are injected simultaneously [2]. In the case of aluminum, due to its low melting temperature, the synthesis of VACNT requires a significant reduction in the growth temperature as compared to conventional substrates [3]. Our results show that, with our single-step process, it is possible to obtain clean, long and dense VACNTs, with a growth rate at the best state of the art level for such a low temperature. A particular attention has been paid to the study of the CNT/Al interface. The results suggest the crucial role of the interface for an efficient and reproducible VACNT growth. Finally, I will show that the aerosol-assisted CCVD process can be scaled-up [4] to enable the fabrication of innovative ultracapacitors [5] based on VACNTs grown on aluminum foils. [1] M. Delmas, M. Pinault, S. Patel, D. Porterat, C. Reynaud, M. Mayne-L’Hermite, Growth of long and aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes on carbon and metal substrates., Nanotechnology. 23 (2012) 105604. [2] P. Landois, M. Pinault, S. Rouzière, D. Porterat, C. Mocuta, E. Elkaim, M. Mayne-L’Hermite, P. Launois, In situ time resolved wide angle X-Ray diffraction study of nanotube carpet growth: nature of catalyst particles and progressive nanotube alignment, Carbon N. Y. 7 (2015) 0–10. [3] C. Castro, M. Pinault, D. Porterat, C. Reynaud, M. Mayne-L’Hermite, The role of hydrogen in the aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition process in producing thin and densely packed vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, Carbon N. Y. 61 (2013) 585–594. [4] P. Boulanger, L. Belkadi, J. Descarpentries, D. Porterat, E. Hibert, A. Brouzes, M. Mille, S. Patel, M. Pinault, C. Reynaud, M. Mayne-L’Hermite, J.M. Decamps, Towards large scale aligned carbon nanotube composites: an industrial safe-by-design and sustainable approach, J. Phys. Conf. Ser. 429 (2013) 12050. [5] S. Lagoutte, P.-H. Aubert, M. Pinault, F.O. Tran-Van, M. Mayne-L’Hermite, C. Chevrot, Poly(3-methylthiophene)/Vertically Aligned Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes: Electrochemical Synthesis, Characterizations and Electrochemical Storage Properties in Ionic Liquids, Electrochim. Acta. 130 (2014) 754–765.

Biography:
Cecile Reynaud has her expertise in the synthesis and chemical physics of nanomaterials. Her work has mainly dealt with silicon nanocrystals and aligned carbon nanotubes. She was for 15 years at the head of the Laboratory of Nanometric Assemblies (LEDNA) in the fundamental research division of Saclay CEA center. The LEDNA group follows the "bottom-up" approach of nanosciences. It develops its own synthesis methods and obtains nanostructured materials with well-controlled characteristics. The applications are relevant for energy, health, environmental issues and the development of composite materials. The group also develop the up-scaling of its processes to allow their industrial transfer.

N. Kamoun Turki
N. Kamoun Turki

Université de Tunis El Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Département de Physique, Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée.

Title of Talk: Investigations on the growth of quaternary nanomaterials Cu2In(1-X)GaxS2 and Cu2ZnSnS4 for solar cell devices.

N. Kamoun Turki

Université de Tunis El Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Département de Physique, Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée.

Title of Talk:
Investigations on the growth of quaternary nanomaterials Cu2In(1-X)GaxS2 and Cu2ZnSnS4 for solar cell devices.

Abstract:
CuIn1_xGaxS2 (CIGS) and Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) multi-component semiconductor thin films were prepared on glass substrates by chemical spray pyrolysis. CIGS thin layers are grown using different concentrations of gallium in the spray solutions (y = ([Ga3+]/[In3+]) varying from 0 to 20 at% by a step of 5 at%). We reported two new structures for CuInS2/β-In2_xAlxS2/ZnO:Al and CuIn1_xGaxS2 (y = 10 at%)/β-In2-xAlxS2/ZnO:Al solar cells to investigate the effect of gallium incorporation on the photovoltaic parameters. We found that the Ga-containing cell shows conversion efficiency higher than the Ga-free reference cell due to higher open-circuit voltage (Voc = 540 mV) and short-circuit current density (Jsc = 10 mA cm_2). Then CIGS may be replaced by Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) which has received considerable attention as one of the promising absorbers for the fabrication of solar cells with conversion efficiency close to 12.6% . Sprayed Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films have been prepared using both aqueous and alcoholic solution. For the aqueous solution, CZTS thin films, elaborated at a substrate temperature of 280 °C and followed by a thermal treatment under nitrogen atmosphere at 500 °C, present the best physical properties. For the CZTS sprayed using the methanol as solvent, The thin film prepared at 0.04 M as thiourea concentration exhibits much better crystallinity, less secondary phases and has the closest band gap to the theoretical value. Followed by an annealing process under nitrogen atmosphere for an hour at 550 °C, the structural, optical and electrical properties of that film shows a drastic improvements

Biography:
She is a full Professor at the Faculty of Sciences of Tunis (FST) University of Tunis El Manar Tunisia. She obtained her PhD thesis in 1992 from FST and the Habilitation (HDR) in Physics in Tunisia (FST) in 2000 and she is a Professor since 2007. Her academic research focuses on Transparent conductive oxides (TCO : ZnO, SnO2, In2O3, TiO2, MoO3, Fe2O3 and Fe3O4), binary semiconductors (In2S3, SnS, CdS, Cu2S, ZnS, PbS and MgS), ternary (CuInS2, In(2-x)GaxS2, P3HT and P3OT) and quaternary compounds (CuIn(1-x)GaxS2 :CIGS and Cu2ZnSnS4 :CZTS) for opto-electronic applications such as photocatalysis, gaz sensors, solar cells, UV and IR detectors. Nanomaterials and thin films are grown by different low cost techniques (spray pyrolysis, chemical bath deposition (CBD), spin coating, electrodeposition and sputtering). She pulished about 100 papers in International Journals with impact factor and supervised more than 20 PhD thesis. Since 1989 she is a researcher in Physics Condensed Matter Laboratory (LPMC) where she was a head (2011-2015). In the period 2013-2014 she occupied the post of General Director of Physico-Chemical Analysis Institute (INRAP) in the Technopole of Sidi Thabet. She was a vice President of AUF COMARES (for MAGHREB : 2013-2015) and she is, since 2013, a representative of the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research on the board of directors of the National Metrology Agency (ANM). Since 2001 she is a Director of Synthesis of nanomaterials and thin film semiconductors for optoelectronic applications, Physics Condensed Matter Laboratory. In 2016 she is elected a TWAS (The World Academy of Science) member. Since 2015 she is elected as ARA (American Romanian Academy) member.

Nadia Sid
Nadia Sid

TWI Ltd Granta Park Great Abington, CB21 6AL Cambridge, United Kingdom

Title of Talk: Development and Demonstration of Highly Insulating, Construction Materials from Bio-derived Aggregates

Nadia Sid

TWI Ltd Granta Park Great Abington, CB21 6AL Cambridge, United Kingdom

Title of Talk:
Development and Demonstration of Highly Insulating, Construction Materials from Bio-derived Aggregates

Abstract:
The ISOBIO project will develop a new approach to insulating materials through the novel combination of existing bio-derived aggregates with low embodied carbon and with innovative binders to produce durable composite construction materials. These novel composites will target 50% lower embodied energy and CO2 at component level and 20% better insulation properties than conventional material. The project will also seek to demonstrate a reduction of at least 15% in total costs and 5% total energy spent over the lifetime of a building. ISOBIO started by identifying promising organic materials that could be used as insulation. Many of these are classified as waste or by-products of processes like food production. Finely chopped bio-materials such as hemp and straw are treated with hygrothermal resins and nano-particles that make them robust, breathable, moisture resistant, and fire retardant. The bio-aggregates are typically the result of combining organic and inorganic materials; the organic material may have natural insulating properties, for example, while the inorganic material may make the resulting bio-aggregate more robust. Combing organic materials with inorganic materials is not always easy, however. Hemp, for instance, is being combined with lime mortar but the two materials have a degree of chemical incompatibility which could result in a reduction in the strength of the composite material. To overcome this challenge, ISOBIO’s researchers are using nano-technology to increase the interfacial strength between the two materials, giving the resulting composite material improved mechanical and structural properties. The new materials not only improve upon the performance of conventional materials, they also offer new features. Hemp shiv, which is the core of the hemp stalk, for example, has a porous structure that provides moisture buffering to maintain humidity at a more constant level. While the new composite materials may provide more comfort, they need to be at least as robust as conventional materials. To make the hemp-based bio-aggregate water repellent, for example, ISOBIO’s researchers are applying hydrophobic treatments to it. The result is that water vapour can travel in and out of the material but liquid water cannot penetrate it. TWI is exploring the development of novel inorganic-organic hybrid nano-materials, to be applied as a surface treatment onto bio-based aggregates. These nanoparticles are synthesised by sol-gel processing and then functionalised with silanes to impart multifunctionality e.g. hydrophobicity, fire resistance and chemical bonding between the silica nanoparticles and the bio-based aggregates. This talk will illustrate the approach taken by TWI to design the functionalised silica nanoparticles by using a material-by-design approach. The formulation and synthesise process will be presented together with the challenges addressed by those hybrid nano-materials. The results obtained with regards to the water repellence and fire resistance will be displayed together with preliminary public results of the ISOBIO project.

Biography:

OLAYINKA OLUWASEUN OJO
OLAYINKA OLUWASEUN OJO

University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Title of Talk: Synthesis of Graphene Oxide under Differing Conditions and its Characterization

OLAYINKA OLUWASEUN OJO

University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Title of Talk:
Synthesis of Graphene Oxide under Differing Conditions and its Characterization

Abstract:
Carbon based graphene oxide was synthesized by a modified Hummer’s method with different ratios of graphite to sodium nitrate (NaNO3) of 1:1, 1:2, and 2:1. These variations were carried out to determine which conditions would afford more oxygen functional groups. The products obtained, namely, GO1:1, GO1:2, GO2:1, were characterized by means of powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. XRD revealed that GO2:1 is more crystalline than either GO1:1 or GO1:2, while Raman spectroscopy confirmed the in-phase vibration (G-band) of GO2:1 at 1596 nm and the disorder band (D-band) at 1347 nm. Also, TEM showed the expected layer structure of the graphene oxide sheet. FTIR revealed the presence of oxygen functional groups while the elemental analysis confirmed that GO 2:1 has more oxygen functional groups than GO1:1 and GO1:2. Thus, the synthesis of GO with a limited amount of sodium nitrate provided a more crystalline and oxygen-functionalized material.

Biography:
Olayinka Ojo obtained her M.Tech in 2015 from school of chemistry, University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria. Currently, she is pursuing her PhD degree at University of Kwazulu-natal, Durban, South Africa under the supervision of Prof. Sreekantha Jonnalagadda. Her current research interest is focused mainly on the synthesis and application of carbon-based materials.

Uttam Kumar Sarkar
Uttam Kumar Sarkar

Department of Physics, Malda College, Malda-732101, WB, India

Title of Talk: SERS study of arylazo heterocycles adsorbed on silver nano particles

Uttam Kumar Sarkar

Department of Physics, Malda College, Malda-732101, WB, India

Title of Talk:
SERS study of arylazo heterocycles adsorbed on silver nano particles

Abstract:
Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is a surface sensitive technique that results in the enormous enhancement (by 106-1012 order) of Raman Scattering by nano structured metals —a technique that can now detect a single molecule1. The theoretical understanding of SERS, though not definite and still evolving, principally falls into two distinct concepts: (i) long range electromagnetic effect and (ii) short-range chemical effect due to charge transfer between the metal and the adsorbed molecule 2,3 Azobenzene (AB) and its derivatives are active components in various applications, such as liquid crystals, optical switching, memory storage, and photofunctional ionic liquids. Recently, it has been recognized that the photoinduced isomerisation of AB can regulate biological processes that have important implications in pharmacology, nanotechnology, and cell biology.4 Heterocyclic molecules with lone pair of electrons on their heteroatom show significant chemical interaction (chemisorption) with silver nano particles through exchange of electronic charge. The arylazo heterocycles (AAH) are N-heterocycles having two or more heteroatoms, N/O/S and a pendant azo group. Six-membered N-heterocycles being π-deficient are excellent π-acceptors while five membered N-heterocycles are much poorer π-acceptors and hence better π-donors. One of the phenyl rings in AB being replaced by heterocyclic imidazole ring, the phenylazo-imidazole is obtained and an interesting class of heterocyclic azo compounds is thus constituted. These molecules with N-heteroatom have azoimine –N==N– functional group which has interesting properties. Because of the imidazole group and the azo group metal complexes of these molecules are formed which act as a molecular switch. Interaction of these molecules with the nano structured metal surface has, thus been important to study. SERS study of silver nano particle induced dark isomerisation in aryl azo imidazoles5 and their plasmon induced and pH controlled semiconductive conformation6, manifested as “first layer effect”7-10 have further substantiated the possibility of using these AAHs as significant functional materials.

Biography:
Dr. Sarkar carried out his initial research works in the Department of Spectroscopy, IACS, Jadavpur (Kolkata), India, where Prof. C.V. Raman’s Nobel winning spectrograph is archived. He has been awarded with the University Gold Medal and Prof. S. N. Bose Memorial Medal. He published a number of research papers in journals of high impact factors and delivered invited speech in different International Conferences in India and abroad which include a speech at Stony Brook University, New York, USA. The field of his research is “Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)”. Dr. Sarkar first observed the “first layer effect” of SERS in silver sol.

Neeraj Mishra
Neeraj Mishra

I.S.F. College of Pharmacy, Ferozpur,Moga, Punjab, India

Title of Talk: Development and characterization of Morin hydrate loaded micellar nanocarriers for the effective management of Alzheimer`s disease

Neeraj Mishra

I.S.F. College of Pharmacy, Ferozpur,Moga, Punjab, India

Title of Talk:
Development and characterization of Morin hydrate loaded micellar nanocarriers for the effective management of Alzheimer`s disease

Abstract:
The aim of this study was to prepare and characterize oral delivery of Morin hydrate loaded micellar nanocarriers using Pluronic P127 & Pluronic F123 for the effective management of Alzheimer’s disease. After administration of formulation brain and blood drug concentration were found to be highest for optimized morin hydrate loaded micellar nanocarriers as compared to plain morin hydrate. Significant (P < 0.05) reduction in assessed pharmacodynamic parameters was observed after administration of morin hydrate loaded micellar nanocarriers as compared to disease control group. Chronic treatment with morin loaded micelles significantly increased the memory in AlCl3 induced Alzheimer’s disease in wistar rats.

Biography:
Dr. Neeraj Mishra is working as Associate Professor in Department of Pharmaceutics at ISF College of Pharmacy, Moga (Punjab). He has completed his B. Pharm (2000), M. Pharm (2003) and Ph.D.(2011) in Pharmaceutical Sciences from Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Dr. H.S. Gour Central University, Sagar (M.P.). He was qualified in National Level Test GATE conducted by IIT, Kanpur in 2001. He is having around fifteen years teaching experience at post graduate and under graduate level. He is also having four years of research experience in Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Dr. H.S. Gour Central University, Sagar (M.P.). (2006-2010). He is also having one year of industry experience as production chemist in Symbiotec Pvt. Ltd., Indore (2000-2001). He was recipient of ICMR- SRF (New Delhi, India) (Grant: 45/02/2007-BMS/ PHA Dated 06\07\2007\H.S.Gour) during his Ph.D. tenure. He is having 44 International and 18 National Publication typically in recent concept of novel drug delivery system, particularly in vaccine delivery and drug targeting. He is also written 2 book chapter in national and International publisher (Nova Science Publishers). He is having membership of the Indian Pharmaceutical Association (Life Time membership MP/IND/LM/0086) and Association of Pharmaceutical Teachers of India (APTI) life membership No. is PU/LM-379. He is also guided 30 students for their M. Pharm project work. In Addition to this he is also acts as a reviewer of International repute journal (Journal of Microencapsulation (Informa Pharmaceutical Science). He has successfully organized one AICTE sponsored national seminar on “Emerging trends and applications of nanotechnology” on 11th June 2011 as Organizing secretary as organizing secretary in Swami Vivekanand College of Pharmacy, Indore (M.P.). He has also presented his research work in National and International conferences.

Sessions:

Nanomedicine and Biomedical Engineering
Dajue Wang
Dajue Wang

Title of Talk: Can quantum life sciences go clinical?

Dajue Wang

Title of Talk:
Can quantum life sciences go clinical?

Abstract:
This talk is to break the myth that quantum life sciences (QLS) are not for clinicians but basic researchers only. It is NOT! Before 1950s, long bone fractures were treated with either non-surgical (conservative) or surgical method by stabilising the ends of the broken segments and make them stick and grow together. It did not work out properly because none of the devices used for the purpose stabilised the ends satisfactorily and translational movements perpendicular to the long axis of the bone ensued. The alignment of the broken segments was not normal. The translational movements beyond the margin of the cross-section of the fractured site caused bone cell to grow outside the bone margin. This is known as the callus. Such a healing process takes at least 6 weeks before the bone can bear some weight. This is known as the “secondary bone healing” through callus formation. Callus is a hard scar-like tissue that is later calcified and ossified as bone tissue. The compression plate introduced by GW Bagby in 1958 changed all this. When placed at the fracture site, it compresses the ends of the fragment segments. The fixation is so rigid that it does not allow any translational movement to take place. The compression triggers an electromagnetic effect and positive and negative ions are created. Between the ions of opposite polarity, metabolism and cell growth occur cross the cell membrane through interaction between transmitters and receptors. In this way, the healing process starts almost immediately and the fractured bone heals directly and quickly. It is coined the “primary bone healing” without ugly callus formation. Supported by the additional enormous strength of the specially designed plate, the fracture site can bear stress (compression or tension) in 2 weeks. This compression and electromagnetic effect combined is known as the Piezoelectric Effect (PE) that is an extremely important part of Quantum Mechanics (QM). PE exists wherever and whenever there are crystals that virtually exist in all cells. I prefer not to use the term Nano Medicine (NM) because nano is only about the size of the material whilst Medicine is restricted to animals. The term Quantum Live Sciences (QLS) involves a much wider scope and explains better how lives work at particle level. As it is described above, medicine has been using this method successfully for more than six decades on a daily basis but, unfortunately, most people do not realise that QM and QLS are right in front of their eyes. There is pressing need to improve our knowledge, as Stephen Hawking puts it: “QM is behind everything in life”. Where does the energy of piezoelectricity come from? It can only come from the Sun, the sole energy source in the Solar System. Herein, the QM comes into play. The next question is how it affects the organisms or living bodies in the perspective of physics. There is no better explanation by the famous Nobel Prize Laureate for Physics Richard P Feynman. It is surprisingly clever that the front cover alone of his immortal book entitled “QED – the strange theory of light and matter” supplemented with 3 graphs is sufficient to tell the audience the very basics of QM and QLS. The energy comes from the ray of bosons/photons (light) emitted by the Sun. When it hits a matter (a cell and an organism are both matters) an electron is created. If a series of electrons are created as a result of collision of multiple photons with the matter involved, electric current ensues. Our secondary school education tells us that the electricity and magnetism are inseparable twins. Hence QM and related QLS are all about electromagnetism that creates ions with resultant interaction of molecules. This is how all lives are created and evolve. Obviously, QLS are much more complex than what I have just described. It would take many years of spare-time study for a clinician to understand and absorb. Assistance from and collaboration with physicists are always helpful and in many cases necessary. Once you know the basics, the door of QLS is wide open to you. Your further efforts will definitely be rewarded with outstanding success.

Biography:
Dajue Wang was brought up in the English-speaking School, St Francis Xavier’s College in Shanghai. He achieved top in both written and spoken English. This has facilitated his reading references on international scale. He also received good results for physics that he was fascinated about. After graduation from the Harbin Medical University (formerly the Japanese Northern Manchurian Medical University), he spent most of his time as both a surgeon and a neuroscientist in the Peking University hospitals and the Neuro-surgical Institute, Beijing Xuanwu Hospital. He has also worked in 5 more other major hospitals for a short period of time. During the Cultural Revolution, he was sent to a Colliery Hospital in Gansu Province as an all-round surgeon. After the Cultural Revolution, he was sent to the University College London and Stoke Mandeville Hospital in the UK as a senior clinical and engineering researcher in 1980. After returning to China, he helped Deng Pufang (Deng Xiaoping’s son) set up China’s first rehabilitation hospital in Beijing. He went back to the UK as a visiting clinical research professor in 1991. His interest is far beyond medicine and he has been granted 4 international patents of innovation. After retirement in 2003, he began to learn Nano-technology and QM by himself. He reads attentively Feynman, Al-Khalili, Hawkings etc. As to life science, he consults Jone’s “Soft Machine”. He has delivered lectures on nanomedicine at the Peking University Third Hospital and the International Association of Neurorestoratology. They were well received.

Felismina Teixeira Coelho Moreira
Felismina Teixeira Coelho Moreira

School of Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of Porto, Portugal

Title of Talk: Development of Paper-based Colour Test-Strip for Alzheimer biomarker detection in point-of-care

Felismina Teixeira Coelho Moreira

School of Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of Porto, Portugal

Title of Talk:
Development of Paper-based Colour Test-Strip for Alzheimer biomarker detection in point-of-care

Abstract:
The present work discloses the creation of an autonomous PAPER-BASED COLOR TEST-STRIP device by integrating a biorecognition element (plastic antibody) that interacts with a biomarker associated to a neurological disorders and depression, amyloid β-42 (Aβ-42) generating a coulored signal that is visible to the naked eye. This was done by establishing suitable chemical changes upon cellulose, attributing the paper the ability to react with the peptide and to produce a colour change. This strategy is combined with molecular imprinting material (MIP) as a bio-recognition element synthesized on cellulose paper surface. We demonstrated when integrates MIP based paper test strips with conventional protein staining methods such as coomassie blue (CB) staining is enough for specific detection and quantification of Aβ-42. The biosensor shows a linear behavior between 1 ng/mL and 10 µg/mL for imprinting material and random behavior for the sensor without the template molecule (NIP). Good selectivity was observed towards protein A (100µg/mL), myoglobin (7.2 mg/mL), bovine serum albumin (1 mg/mL) and fetal bovine serum. The control of the chemical surface modifications were evaluated by FTIR analysis. The disclosed optical (bio)sensor provides an independent read-out, equipment-free, simple, low cost, long pot life and very low detection limit device used for tracking any (bio)molecule of interest, for instance, in health, environment and food safety domains.

Biography:
Felismina Moreira, is graduated in Chemical Engineering of the School of Engineering of the Polytechnique School of Porto, holds a Master degree in Chemistry and food Safety Technology of the Faculty of Science of the University of Porto, and received her PhD in Sustainable Chemistry from the Faculty of Sciences and Technology of the New University of Lisbon, Portugal. Presently, she holds postdoctoral position at BioMark Sensor Research, in the School of Engineering of the Polytechnique School of Porto in collaboration with Imperial College of London, Department of Chemistry and Institute of Biomedical Engineering. Her main research interests are devoted to the development of a) biomimetic materials applied in biomedicine and (bio)sensors, b) selective sensory surfaces applied in (bio) sensors and c) implantable hybrid devices of sensory capacity based on enzymatic biofuel cell.

Zahra Bakhtiary
Zahra Bakhtiary

Faculty of Pharmacy, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

Title of Talk: Development of a novel dry powder inhaler of erlotinib-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer

Zahra Bakhtiary

Faculty of Pharmacy, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

Title of Talk:
Development of a novel dry powder inhaler of erlotinib-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer

Abstract:
Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) having a sensitizing mutation in the endothelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, are susceptible to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Erlotinib. Erlotinib is currently the standard of care in treatment of advanced and/or metastatic NSCLC. Although Erlotinib is available as an oral tablet, to further improve its clinical benefits, local delivery of Erlotinib to the tumor(s) in the lungs can be an innovative strategy. Therefore, the aim of this study is fabrication of an Erlotinib-loaded SLN formulation for developing a dry powder inhaler (DPI) for direct delivery of Erlotinib to the lungs. Optimal compritol/poloxamer 407 SLNs were produced in sub-100 nm spherical shape and showed an encapsulation efficiency of 78.21% for Erlotinib. MTT assay and DAPI staining showed that the SLN formulation enhanced the cytotoxicity of Erlotinib in A549 model NSCLC cell line. The SLNs were successfully spray dried into microparticles (1-5 µm) with mannitol as a carrier. The powder had suitable flowability and aerodynamic behavior and could thus theoretically provide a deep inhalation pattern, as assessed by Carr' Index, Hausner ratio and Next Generation Impactor (NGI). Taken together, the fabricated SLNs can be promising candidates for improving the efficacy of Erlotinib in NSCLC treatment.

Biography:
My name is Zahra and I have received a doctorate of pharmacy (Pharm.D) degree from Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. My thesis was about « Preparation of Dry Powder Inhalation of Erlotinib-Loaded Nanolipidic Carriers and Evaluation of Its Physicochemical and Biological Characteristics”. I'm interested in developing nanoparticle based drug delivery systems for treatment of cancer.

Sessions:

Nanomedical Approaches for Cancer Diagnosis
Adelaide Greco
Adelaide Greco

University of Naples Federico II, Department of Advanced Biomedical Science, Italy; Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, CNR, Italy.

Title of Talk: Preclinical Imaging for a Theranostic Approach using Engineered Nanoparticles in mice models of lymphoma.

Adelaide Greco

University of Naples Federico II, Department of Advanced Biomedical Science, Italy; Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, CNR, Italy.

Title of Talk:
Preclinical Imaging for a Theranostic Approach using Engineered Nanoparticles in mice models of lymphoma.

Abstract:
Nanoparticles (Np) are used in a wide range of biomedical applications, overall in cancer theranostic field. Hyaluronic acid (HA)-based nanoparticles (NPs) have numerous active groups that make them ideal as tumor-targeted carriers. The Np combined with peptides, allows an efficient in vivo targeting useful to improve drug delivery and clinical outcome. We report the in vivo targeting of aggressive A20 murine B-cell lymphoma by idiotype-specific peptide pA20-36 (Pep) using fluorescence molecular tomographic (FMT) imaging and ex vivo Magnetic Resonance in a xenograft mouse models of lymphoma A20. After that we evaluated the in vitro and vivo therapeutic efficiency of Pep-NPs versus an ad hoc control molecule. Methods: Females Balb/c nu/nu mice (n=44) of 8 weeks old, were studied. Thirtysix mice were subcutaneously injected with 5 x 106 with A20 cell line, while 8 mice were not injected with any cell (ctrl). All mice since cell injection were fed with specific food to minimize the level of intestinal autofluorescence. After 12 days, all mice were divided into 4 groups divided for intravenously injection: the first, Pep-NPs, (n = 12) receives 100 µL of a NPs suspension containing 4 nmol of ATTO680 and decorated with A20-36 peptide, the second, CNT-NPs, (n = 12) receives 100 µL of injected with 100 µl of a NPs suspension containing 4 nmol of ATTO680 decorated with the scrambled peptide, the third, Control, (n = 12) injected with 100 µl of unloaded, non-decorated NPs, the fourth group of Negative Control non-tumor-bearing, were injected with 100 µl of a NPs suspension containing 4 nmol of ATTO680 and decorated with A20-36 peptide. All NPs contained Gd-DTPA. Excitation detection channel was 680 nm for all studies. All procedures are performed under general anesthesia (isoflurane 4% and oxygen 1 L/min). Imaging was performed at 1, 2, 4, 6, 24 h post injection, using the FMT 4000TM fluorescence tomography in vivo imaging system (PerkinElmer, Waltham, MA), which collected both 2D surface fluorescence reflectance images as well as 3D FMT imaging datasets. At the end of the FMT study animals were sacrificed, tumors were surgically removed, and were evenly allocated to an ex vivo FMT followed by confocal microscopy, and ex vivo MRI. High Frequency Ultrasound was used to monitor the tumor growth/tumor reduction in mouse models subjected to therapy. Results: Mice injected with Pep-NPs, showed peak fluorescence at 3h post injection, but at subsequent time points the fluorescence decreases up to 0 at 24h. The fluorescence reflectance signal (FIS% ) was significantly higher (P=0.0001) with Pep-NPs (98.5 ± 46.1) compared to both pCNT-NPs (8.4 ± 1.9) and control mice (7.1 ± 1.7). Even if not significantly, the FlS% of Pep-NPs was always higher than that of the other two groups. For Pep-NPs loaded with Gd-DTPA, ex vivo MRI showed a signal intensity of 175.1 ± 15.8, which was significantly higher than the signal detected for both pCNT-NPs (85.5 ± 7.9) and controls with non-decorated and unloaded NPs (57.9 ± 10.1) (P<0.0001). The latter two groups were not significantly different. Ex vivo confocal microscopy confirmed these data. Finally, the pA20-36-NPs (P<0.0001) and pA20-36 (P=0.02) treated mice had smaller tumors compared with the pCNT and pCNT-NPs treated mice after the first week of treatment (23.1 ± 9.2 vs. 66.5 ± 15.6 vs. 119.9 ± 13.1 vs. 127.1 ± 45.7 mm3, respectively). Conclusion: We demonstrated the ability of NPs loaded with fluorescent and paramagnetic tracers to act as multimodal imaging contrast agents and hence as a non-toxic, highly specific theranostic system. We set up a new imaging system for non invasive diagnosis of B cell Lymphoma and therapy in mice.

Biography:
Professor Greco has more than 15 years of experience in the field of Preclinical Imaging applied to the diagnosis and therapy of mice models of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. She has got her PhD in the Veterinary University of Naples Federico II where she learned the principles of Radiology in small animal practice. She worked as invited researcher at Marshall University, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology & Department of Surgery, and Translational Genomic Research Institute Laboratories, Edwards Cancer Center, Huntington, WV, testing nanosystems for drug delivery and therapy in mice models of cancer. Actually she is Professor at the Medical School of Naples Federico II where she worked ad PI in a preclinical Imaging Laboratory hosted at Ceinge Biotecnologie Avanzate, scarl Napoli, italy.

RD Ralandinliu Kahmei
RD Ralandinliu Kahmei

National Institute of Technology Nagaland, India

Title of Talk: Comparative study on the heating efficiency of CTAB coated superparamagnetic MnFe2O4, NiFe2O4 and ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles for Hyperthermia application

RD Ralandinliu Kahmei

National Institute of Technology Nagaland, India

Title of Talk:
Comparative study on the heating efficiency of CTAB coated superparamagnetic MnFe2O4, NiFe2O4 and ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles for Hyperthermia application

Abstract:
CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) coated manganese ferrite (MnFe2O4), nickel ferrite (NiFe2O4) and zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4) nanoparticles with crystallite sizes of 23 nm, 15 nm, and 28 nm respectively were successfully synthesized by a facile co-precipitation method. The presence of CTAB on the surface of the nanoparticles was confirmed by the Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Fourier Transform-Infrared spectrum (FT-IR). The magnetic study shows a high saturation magnetization of 46 emu/g (MnFe2O4), 59 emu/g (NiFe2O4) and 55 emu/g (ZnFe2O4) which indicates the Fe-O-Fe super-exchange interaction driven by the synergistic influence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy and cation distribution. The Field Cooling (FC) and Zero Field Cooling (ZFC) curves confirmed the superparamagnetic nature of all the samples. The induction heating study elucidates the efficiency of heat generation (>42°C) in all samples showing an exceptionally high specific absorption rate (SAR) of 480 Wg-1, 684 Wg-1, 586 Wg-1 at 2 mg/ml in which CTAB-NiFe2O4 nanoparticles shows the highest efficiency. This is attributed to the co-dependent factors: size, saturation magnetization and Neelian relaxation loss mechanism. This comparative study discussed on the collaborative influences of structural motifs and magnetic properties that engendered the effectiveness of heat generation making it viable for hyperthermia application.

Biography:

Sessions:

Carbon nanomaterials, devices and technologies
Olga Glukhova
Olga Glukhova

Department of Radiotechnique and Electrodynamics Saratov State University, Faculty of Physics, Astrakhanskaya street 83, Saratov, 410012 Russia

Title of Talk: Novel hybrid carbon nanomaterials for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries

Olga Glukhova

Department of Radiotechnique and Electrodynamics Saratov State University, Faculty of Physics, Astrakhanskaya street 83, Saratov, 410012 Russia

Title of Talk:
Novel hybrid carbon nanomaterials for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries

Abstract:
At present, the lithium-ion batteries are the main type of technology used to store energy. The main task on the way of wide use of the batteries of this class is to increase their specific and volumetric energy densities, charging speed, stability in operation. In this regard, the choice of the material for electrodes of the ion-lithium batteries is an actual scientific problem. With the development of the nanoindustry, the production of ion-lithium batteries was improved along with the technology for synthesis of nanomaterials. This led to the emergence of a new direction - ion-lithium batteries based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), including CNTs decorated with nanoparticles of metal oxides of the MnO2/SnO2/Al2O3 type [1-2]. According to experts [3], ion-lithium batteries on CNTs occupy a central place in the field of energy saving, since they possess a number of advantages, in particular ecological safety of used nanomaterials, the ability to increase the efficiency of energy storage through the functionalization and improvement of nanomaterials based on CNTs, the ability to maintain electrophysical properties in homogeneous and heterogeneous deformations. At the moment, a new and extremely promising branch of the development of ion-lithium batteries is a battery class using a nanomaterial based on gamma-Fe2O3 (maghemite) nanoparticles as a negative electrode. The large reserves of iron in Earth's crust, its nontoxicity, make this material an ideal candidate for industrial use from an ecological and economic point of view. The compounds of gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles with CNTs predict an increase in the capacity of the ion-lithium batteries, an increase in the discharge/charge kinetics and electrical conductivity. In addition, developed technology of single-stage synthesis of CNTs with gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles inside and on the surface of the tubes [4] allows us to obtain this material in a macro volume, which predetermines its economic benefits for the manufacture of ion-lithium batteries in comparison with others. We developed a prototype of a new class of highly efficient flexible lithium-ion batteries with a negative electrode based on CNT/gamma-Fe2O3 nanomaterial, which is carbon nanotubes decorated with iron (III) oxide gamma-phase nanoparticles. Using the Density Functional based Tight Binding (DFTB) method and the Non-equilibrium Green function method (NEGF) carried out a series of numerical experiments in order to reveal structural and electrophysical properties of CNT/gamma-Fe2O3 nanomaterial. During the investigation we study a mechanism of contact of gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles with carbon nanotubes. The enthalpy of formation and binding energy were calculated for considered CNT/gamma-Fe2O3 nanomaterial. The electronic transfer between a gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticle and a nanotube was considered for the first time. We found the effect of a gamma-Fe2O3 on the conductive properties of CNT, depending on the particle size and the chirality of CNTs. Also we study the effect of deformations on the electrical conductivity of CNTs decorated with gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles.

Biography:
O.E. Glukhova, Doctor of science in physics and mathematics, now is a head of Department of Radiotechnique and electrodynamics at Saratov State University and leads the Division of Mathematical modeling in Educational and scientific institution of nanostructures and biosystems at Saratov State University. She received her DSc degree in solid state electronics and nanoelectronics from Saratov State University in 2009. Her main fields of investigation are: nanoelectronics, molecular modeling of biomaterials and nanostructures, molecular electronics, mechanics of nanostructures, quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics, carbon nanostructures (fullerenes, nanotubes, graphene, graphane). She has published about 170 peer-reviewed journal papers and four monographs.

Francisco Jose Maldonado
Francisco Jose Maldonado

Department of Inorganic Chemistry University of Granada. Faculty of Sciences. Avda. Fuentenueva s/n 18071. Granada. Spain

Title of Talk: Carbon Nanogels and Nanocomposites for catalytic applications

Francisco Jose Maldonado

Department of Inorganic Chemistry University of Granada. Faculty of Sciences. Avda. Fuentenueva s/n 18071. Granada. Spain

Title of Talk:
Carbon Nanogels and Nanocomposites for catalytic applications

Abstract:
In recent years, there is an increasing interest on obtaining nanocarbon materials for advanced applications. Between them, carbon gels are a relatively new type of carbons materials first prepared by Pekala [1]. They present additional advantages regarding other carbon materials as purity, homogeneity and a nanometric control of morphology, porosity and surface chemistry. In such a basis, carbon gels are considered as nanocarbons materials with hierarchical porosity [3,4]. They improve the characteristic versatility of classical carbon materials in catalysis based on a very flexible sol-gel synthesis method that permits the combination of a large number of variables. There are four critical steps in the synthesis with many variables: preparation of the initial solution (monomers, concentration, catalyst, pH, etc), polymerization and curing (mould type and dimension, temperature program), drying (supercritical, subcritical or cryogenic drying) and finally, carbonization and/or activation (temperature, time, activating agents, etc). Nevertheless, fitting carefully these variables, materials with specific properties can be designed in a wide range of porous and chemical characteristics. They can be prepared in powder, grains, pellets, films, monoliths or coatings of ceramic structures fitting composition from pure carbon materials to carbon functionalized with heteroatoms, carbon – inorganic oxides composites or metal-doped carbon gels and porosity ranging from macro to microporous materials. Their porosity and surface chemistry can be fitted either by fitting the polymerization conditions or as post-synthesis treatments. In this work different series of catalysts based on carbon gels and composites were prepared, exhaustively characterized by different techniques (textural, chemical, structural and mechanical properties are analyzed) and applied in environmental catalyzed processes (air and water treatments), energetic or fine chemistry synthesis of valuable products. The correlation of the parameters of synthesis, physicochemical properties and catalytic performance is presented, looking for the interactions and synergism between phases.

Biography:
Francisco José Maldonado Hódar is Professor at the University of Granada, Spain, Department of Inorganic Chemistry. Doctor in Chemistry from 1993 by this University his research interest is focused in the areas of Carbon Materials and Heterogeneous Catalysis, developing materials with fitted physicochemical properties to be used as adsorbent, molecular sieves and mainly as heterogeneous catalysts, in processes that involve the environment protection, clean energy or fine chemistry. He is coauthor of more than 100 highly cited manuscript, different book chapters and patents.

Sessions:

Nanobiotechnology
Roberto Grau
Roberto Grau

1.Laboratorio de Microbiología. Facultad de Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de Rosario (UNR) y Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET). Rosario, Argentina. 2.Instituto de Física Rosario (IFIR-CONICET) Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, UNR.

Title of Talk: Metal nanoparticles as a novel and safe strategy to fight pathogenic spores and antibiotic-resistant microbial biofilms.

Roberto Grau

1.Laboratorio de Microbiología. Facultad de Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de Rosario (UNR) y Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET). Rosario, Argentina. 2.Instituto de Física Rosario (IFIR-CONICET) Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, UNR.

Title of Talk:
Metal nanoparticles as a novel and safe strategy to fight pathogenic spores and antibiotic-resistant microbial biofilms.

Abstract:
Biofilms are three-dimensional structures that contains billions of genetically identical bacteria submerged in a self-produced extracellular matrix, which protect bacteria from antibiotics and the human immunological defenses. More than 85 % of chronic and/or recurrent human infections are linked to bacterial biofilms. In addition, spore-forming pathogenic bacteria represent an additional community threat because of their intrinsic refractory behavior against antibiotics, phagocytes and their easy utilization in bioterrorist attacks. Therefore, every day the available microbicide arsenal against biofilms and spores becomes scarcer. Accordingly, nano-material biotechnology emerges as a promising alternative for reducing the detrimental effects of microbial-related diseases. Here we describe the development of novel nanostructured coating systems with improved photocatalytic and antibacterial activities. These systems comprise, in one case, layers of SiO2 followed by layers of mesoporous or dense TiO2-anatase, and doping with silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs). In the other case, we developed Copper NPs and its oxides by a chemical method based on a bottom up approach and its stabilization using aminosilanes as surface modifiers. The activity of CuNPs and AgNPs (MNPs) was measured against spores and vegetative (planktonic and sessile) forms of the relevant human pathogens Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (etiological agent of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome), Listeria monocytogenes (etiological agent of septic abortion), Bacillus anthracis (etiological agent of Anthrax), Clostridium perfringens (etiological agent of food-associated diarrhea and Gas Gangrene), cystic-fibrosis related Pseudomona aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ( etiological agent of sepsis and myocardiopathies). The planktonic and sessile growth (measured as the final cellular yield at 600 nm and crystal violet staining, respectively) of each pathogen, as well as the sporocide effect on C. perfringens and B. anthracis spores, was very significant at submillimolar concentrations of MNPs (95 % of vegetative growth inhibition and sporocide effect, p < 0.01). The anti-biofilm effect against the bacterial pathogens was exerted at genetic level as revealed by the downregulated expression produced by the MNPs on transcriptional β-galactosidase and gfp-fluorescence reporter fusions to genes involved in extracellular matrix synthesis. MNP-treatment of pre-formed biofilms dramatically accelerated their dissembling and cellular death without dispersal cell formation. Interestingly, the emergency of MNP-resistant bacterial cells after ten-days of treatment with sub-MIC concentrations of the microbicide was significantly lower (p < 0.01) than the emerged resistance after bacterial treatment with commonly-used available antibiotics. The importance of the MNP treatment adoption as a safe alternative for reducing and preventing pathogen bioburden is discussed.

Biography:
Roberto Grau completed his PhD from Rosario National University in Argentina and obtained his postdoctoral studies from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), Department of Experimental Medicine at San Diego, California, USA. He is a Pew Latin American Fellow (San Francisco, USA), a Fulbright International Scholar (WashigntonDC, USA) and the director of the Molecular Microbiology and Environmental Science Laboratory of the National Council of Scientific Research of Argentina (CONICET). Roberto obtained many national and international awards, published more than 30 papers in reputed journals, formed more than seventy profesionals in science and founded and/or catalyzed the creation of half-dozen biotechnological companies.

Sessions:

Graphene Technologies
T.Theivasanthi
T.Theivasanthi

International Research Center, Kalasalingam University, Krishnankoil– 626126, India.

Title of Talk: Graphene and Nanomaterials

T.Theivasanthi

International Research Center, Kalasalingam University, Krishnankoil– 626126, India.

Title of Talk:
Graphene and Nanomaterials

Abstract:
Science & technology have opened many avenues for nanotechnology in fields such as agriculture, biotechnology, environment, medicine, energy, electrical & electronics, automobiles, mechanical, constructions, information & communications, space etc. This reveals that the nanotechnology provides solutions to the problems arising in these fields. This technology will dominate all the applications oriented fields in coming decades. Nanomaterials are surface enhanced materials have more active sites and can produce more actions. Metal nanoparticles like copper, silver, lead nanopowders and their metallurgical, mechanical, tribological properties are explored in this work. Various Technologies / advanced Materials like low cost / mass production of Graphene, polymers, synthesis, characterizations of metal nanopowders, metal oxide nanopowders, nanofluids, polymer-metal nano-composites and their applications will be explored. Large surface area, high surface‐area‐to‐volume ratio and compatibility with flexible substrates of these materials make them as unique candidate for various applications. Smart materials are changing their properties, in a controlled manner, under the influence of external stimuli. Nanotechnology Enabled Smart Materials are useful in nanosensors and chemical sensors. This work also explains about smart materials, nanomaterials and their applications in various fields including industries (like nanofluids, heat transfer, solar panels, and sensors), biotechnology, biomedical etc. Recent, innovative superparamagnetic plants materials, nano-bio materials and their applications will be discussed. In addition, “Research Motivation” lecture will be presented to motivate students/ researchers.

Biography:
Dr. (Ms) T.Theivasanthi of Kalasalingam University doing research in nanomaterials / nanotechnology; has 14 years of teaching experience; published many research articles/ books and h-index 9; they have been downloaded more than 10000 times; life member of Indian Science Congress Association and Magnetics Society of India; serving as Editorial Board Member/ reviewer for some scientific journals; Lead Editor for the Special Issue on “Advanced Nanomaterial for various Applications” of the Journal of Nanomaterials, Nanoengineering and Nanosystems (SAGE Publications); achieved many awards/ honours/ recognitions including - Madurai Women Achievers Award - 2013, Motivational Award - 2015 and 2015 Women’s Day Award of St.Annes College; achieved World Record in LIMCA Book of Records-2015 for nanotechnology invention “World’s first superparamagnetic plants materials” – named “Santhi Particles”, World Record– 2016 for innovative products "The World’s lowest priced graphene" & "World’s Smallest Particles of Vegetables" and World Record– 2017 for the invention "The World’s Smallest Anti-Viral Plant Particles", other innovative products- Superparamagnetic lead nanoparticles, semiconducting lead Nanoparticles, Low cost-mass production of graphene, agricultural nanofertilisers, vegetable powder for diabetes, plants materials for diabetes & psoriasis and nanoparticles for treatment of EBOLA, DENGUE, HIV & H1N1 virus infection. Govt. of India shows interests to develop her inventions for the benefits of public; she has been invited to deliver lectures (more than 105) in International / National scientific conferences, foreign countries (China, Malaysia, Sri Lanka & Greece) and renowned institutes like National Institute of Technology, Anna University, Central University of all over India; she delivered Motivational Lectures for women, students and staff of institutes / Multi-national corporate companies (Cognizant Technologies); Artha Nyana Academy (Malaysia), ISOM (Malaysia) etc. Economic Times and Telegraph have published news about her research; Thanthi TV, All India Radio, Minnal FM (Malaysia) and Bernama TV (Malaysia) have broadcasted her interviews.