E-mail: admin@worldnanoconference.com | USA : +1-646-828-7579, UK : +44-203-695-1242 | October 16-18, 2017, Dubai, UAE  

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

Keynote Speaker

Alexander M. Korsunsky
University of Oxford,
USA

Title: FIB-DIC mechanical microscopy investigation of Nature’s strain engineering of the human dentine-enamel junction

Biography: Professor Alexander M. Korsunsky (AMK) is a world-leader in engineering microscopy of materials systems and structures for optimisation of design, durability and performance. He leads MBLEM lab at the University of Oxford, and the Centre for In situ Processing Science (CIPS) at Research Complex at Harwell. He consults Rolls-Royce plc on matters of residual stress and structural integrity, and is Editor-in-Chief of Materials & Design, a major Elsevier journal (2016 impact factor 3.997). Tan Sui and AMK lead a major EPSRC research project on nanoscale analysis and modelling of human dental caries.

Abstract: Human dental tissues are hydrated biological mineral composites of hydroxyapatite crystallites within an organic matrix. Dentine and enamel have a hierarchical structure that delivers their versatile mechanical properties. A strong and durable bond between dentine and enamel is formed by the dentine enamel junction (DEJ), an important biological interface that resists failure under long-term harsh thermal and mechanical conditions in the mouth, and only succumbs to disease such as dental caries. Understanding the underlying reasons for this remarkable combination of strength and toughness remains an important challenge, both in the context of dentistry, and from the point of view of pursuing biomimetic advanced materials engineering. One may hypothesise that residual strain develops in the vicinity of the DEJ during odontogenesis (tooth formation). The experimental and interpretational challenges that could not be overcome until recently presented an obstacle to the evaluation of residual stress in the vicinity of the DEJ at the appropriate spatial resolution. We used the recently developed FIB-DIC micro-ring-core method to determine the residual elastic strain at micron resolution. The residual strain profiling across the transition from dentine to enamel are correlated with the study of internal architecture using X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS). We illustrate how this provides improved insight into the origins of the remarkable performance of the DEJ.


Keynote Speaker

ENRICO SABBIONI
Università degli Studi di Milano,
Italy

Title: A FIRST DECADE OF NANOTOXICOLOGY RESEARCH-WHERE ARE WE?

Biography:

Abstract: Nanotechnology and nanoscience represent a technological tsunami for the development of innovative material and new productive sectors at the service of citizens. Nanoscale materials (NM) exhibit properties different from those exhibited on macroscale and their extraordinary properties enable unique applications, e.g. in ceramic, textile, cosmetic, optic, chemical, food industry and biomedicine. In this context, the great innovation potential of NM has led some people to label them as “nano-angels”. However, in spite of hundreds of NM-containing products are already in commercial production, toxicological evidences are emerging concerning their harmful effects to biological systems (e.g. induction of cytotoxic, genotoxic, cardiotoxic effects, oxidative stress and interaction with the immune system), and a huge health and safety questions remain unsolved. This is enough for some people to label NM as “nano-demons”. This dualism, based mostly on emotion than on reliable scientific data, has raised heated controversy in the scientific community, with debates dominated by severe disputes between scientism and technophobia that disconcert a public opinion already per se poorly informed. As the public interest in “nano” and its societal implications is strong it is not surprising that researchers and governmental organizations are pressed to consider seriously the need to assess potential health risks of NM before they become ubiquitous in every aspects of life. Unfortunately, at present, the scientific community has not reached a consensus about the health safety of NM, being the scientific knowledge inadequate for a risk assessment. In this context, a new emerging discipline, nanotoxicology has become a new frontier in nanoparticle toxicology relevant to workplace, general environment and consumer safety. However, the issue of nanotoxicology research is more complicated than previously thought and proactive multidisciplinary research is an urgent need for a mechanistic understanding of the interaction of NM with biological systems, particularly to clarify the relations between their physico-chemical properties (size, shape, surface chemistry, aggregation) and the biological responses. The aim of this presentation is to highlight key aspects emerged in the first decade of nanotoxicology research, from the origin to the present, for the development of sustainable NM that at present we cannot be considered exclusively as “angels” or “demons”.


Keynote Speaker

Alessandro Di Cerbo
University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy
Title: Mechanical phenotyping characterization of K562 cells challenged with oxytetracycline

Biography: In 2007 he achieved the Master Degree in Medical Biotechnologies at University of Modena (Italy), in 2011 obtained the title of PhD in nanoscience and nanotechnology at the same University and in 2016 he got the post graduate diploma in Clinical Biochemistry at University “G. d’Annunzio” of Chieti (Italy). As a postdoc he conducted highly interdisciplinary researches, ranging from nanotechnology to nanomedicine, microbiology, nutrition and translational medicine focusing on the mutual biological interactions between nutraceuticals, drugs and living systems. He is author or co-author of more than 40 articles in peer-reviewed international journals.

Abstract: Antibiotics have generally the purpose of ensuring wellness. A human clinical study revealed huge amounts of oxytetracycline (OTC) and doxycycline in 15 gym-trained subjects, heavy meat consumers, which were affected by several food intolerances and had never used antibiotics in their life [1]. Subsequent in vitro studies suggested a toxic role for OTC, which resulted in a marked pro-inflammatory effect, e.g. IFN-γ release, both in canine and human peripheral blood lymphocytes as well as a pro-apoptotic affect on K562 cells [2, 3]. Now we investigated the behavior of K562 cells challenged with OTC for different incubation times by using the Micropipette Aspiration Technique. We observed that, in the first stage of apoptotic process, OTC significantly increases the cortical tension and the formation of blebs in K562 cells giving rise to specific behaviors while these are aspirated inside a micropipette. In this context, alterations of mechanical properties of living cells might be considered as reliable markers of the presence of a pathological state. Moreover, this potential toxicity of OTC, widely present in meat meals (for animals pet food) and intensive farming-derived meat (for human food), appears of great relevance suggesting a possible implication for the onset of new health risks, depending on the site of entry of OTC in the food supply chain.


Keynote Speaker

Olga E. Glukhova
Saratov State University,
Russian Federation

Title: Novel hybrid carbon materials and their applications in the development of nanoelectronics and nanophotonics

Biography: O.E. Glukhova, Doctor of science in physics and mathematics, now is a head of Department of Radiotechnique and electrodynamics at Saratov State University and leads the Division of Mathematical modeling in Educational and scientific institution of nanostructures and biosystems at Saratov State University. She received her DSc degree in solid state electronics and nanoelectronics from Saratov State University in 2009. Her main fields of investigation are: nanoelectronics, molecular modeling of biomaterials and nanostructures, molecular electronics, mechanics of nanostructures, quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics, carbon nanostructures (fullerenes, nanotubes, graphene, graphane). She has published about 170 peer-reviewed journal papers and four monographs

Abstract: At the present, one of the most perspective directions in materials science is the development of 2D semiconductor materials promising as the element base of multifunctional electronic devices. 2D-materials based on graphene obtained advantages over possible analogues due to features of their structure, namely the atomic thickness and hexagonal lattice. Also, 2D-graphene materials look attractive from an optical point of view. In particular, some graphene-based devices of photonics and optoelectronics have already proposed. Among these devices there are transparent electrodes in displays, solar cells, photodetectors, optical modulators [1-2]. These devices work in a very wide range of wavelengths - from the ultraviolet, visible and near infrared regions of the spectrum to the middle and far infrared regions, as well as the terahertz range. Other perspective materials for optoelectornics and nanophotonics are the carbon nanotubes. Earlier, the models of carbon nanotube-based photovoltaic and light-emitting diodes were presented [3]. Currently, the actual problem is the development of element base for optical devices and photonics new generation of working in a broad frequency range. Using modern methods of predictive modeling and technologies for synthesis of hybrid carbon nanostructures we have developed the models of new nanodevices. In particular, we have created the prototypes of nanodevices for detection of THz radiation on the basis of carbon nanotubes with encapsulated fullerenes. A new type of polarizer based on 2D-hybrid graphene/carbon nanotubes composite is developed. New electronic and optical properties of 2D- and 3D-carbon composite materials are demonstrated.


Keynote Speaker

Adnane Abdelghani
National Institute of Applied Science and Technology,
Tunisia

Title: Nanosensors and New ideas of Start-Up

Biography: Prof.Dr.A.Abdelghani is a Full Professor at the National Institute of Applied Science and Technology (INSAT, Tunisia) working mainly in the field of Microsensors and Microsystems. He obtained the Habilitation in Physics in Tunisia (faculty of Science of Tunis) in 2004 and a Habilitation (worlwide recognition for conducting and leading research) in "Sciences pour l’Ingénieur" in 2009 at the Ecole Normale Supérieur de Cachan (France). He is now the leader and principal investigator of a research group working mainly on gas sensors based on functionalized carbon nanotubes (metallic oxides, nanowires, nanoneedles, polymers) and on the development of interdigitated gold microelectrodes integrated in microfluidic cell for bacteria analysis in biologic medium. He published more than 90 papers in International Journals (H-index 24, December 2016) and supervised more than 12 Ph.D theses and 30 master’s student. He is deeply involved in industrial applications in his field of research with implications for the design and the development of affordable and cost-effective sensing devices for diagnostics and theranostics which will have an effective impact in the developing countries. He received the Tunisian President Award of the “best scientific researcher” in Tunisia in 22 July 2015.

Abstract: In this work, we present an approach for the use of nanosensors for analyte (pesticides, bacteria, heavy ions, C-Reactive Protein, neurotoxin gaz,vapors, etc..) detection for different applications (food analysis, water analysis, medical diagnostic, security, environment, etc..). Most of the analyze detection systems used are time consuming, enable remote sensing and need different steps of preparation. The development of new devices needs laboratory experiment for stability, rapidity and reproducibility studies. We will show the need of the market and the applications for such devices in biotechnology, medicine and security.


Advanced Nanomaterials

Session Introduction

Maher S. Amer
Wright State University, USA
Title: Gigantic Challenges, Nano-Solutions

Biography: Dr. Amer is Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, a senior von Humboldt Fellow, Max Planck Society, Germany, and a former Visiting Fellow of the Fitzwilliam College, University of Cambridge, England. Dr. Amer is a member of a number of national and international committees focused on nanomanufacturing and higher education accreditation. He received his Ph.D. from Drexel University 1995.

Abstract: As we are rapidly approaching year 2050 and the population capacity of planet Earth, it becomes a must to, sooner better than later, face our gigantic challenges. It is widely known that our global stability is seriously threatened by the consequences of our depleting energy and clean water resources. Extensive scientific research over the past 15 years has shown that Nano-technology-based solutions hold promising answers to our pressing needs. However, It is very important to understand the thermodynamic fundamentals governing the structure and performance of such thermodynamic small systems especially their ability to selectively interact with certain chemical moieties and with electromagnetic radiation. Understanding such fundamentals will definitely lead to unique solutions for our pressing challenges. Nanostructured films and membranes engineered to selectively adsorb unwanted chemical, and biological species can provide a valuable solution for water treatment, desalination, and can definitely contribute to the world’s water and environmental challenge. In addition, photovoltaics batteries based on nanostructured fullerene films are also a very promising rout to explore when addressing energy challenges. In this talk, we will discuss both experimental and molecular simulation fundamental work, done in our research group, as related to Energy and water challenges. Biography:


Nyan-hwa Tai
National Tsing-Hua University, Taiwan
Title: Synthesis of Reduced Graphene Oxides and Its Applications for Fog Harvesting and Oil Spill Cleanup

Biography: Nyan-Hwa Tai, a Distinguished Professor of Tsing-Hua University, received his Ph.D. degree from Mechanical Engineering, University of Delaware, USA in 1990. He works for National Tsing-Hua University science 1990; his study involves processing and characterizations of nanocomposites and he focused on the syntheses and applications of graphene and graphene oxides more recently. He published over 220 scientific journal papers with over 4000 citations and a H-index of 31.

Abstract: This work demonstrates an efficient method to fabricate flexible carbon-fiber cloths (FCFC) for fog harvesting and graphene based-sponges (GS) for absorbing spilled oil. The FCFCs have both superhydrophobic and hydrophilic properties in the same face, which can be used effectively for water collection from fog. In addition, the GS with the superhydrophobic and oil-hydrophilic properties can be adopted to clean up oil spillages. In the processing of FCFCs, polydopamin (PD), titanium oxide and poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) were used and the process of the mussel adhesion protein-inspired surface chemistry was applied. The presence of carboxyl-, amino-, imino-, and phenyl- groups of the PD coating layer turns the surface into hydrophilic regardless of its original property and promote the adhesion of the substances. The FCFC exhibited excellent performance in water collection with an efficiency over 200 mg cm-2h-1. In addition, a simple dipping process was adopted for fabricating superhydrophobic and superoleophilic GS using commericial sponge as the backbone ; the synthesized GS possessed very outstanding performance for absorbing spill oil with excellent absorption capacities over 160 times their own weight.


Byung-Koog Jang
National Institute for Materials Science, Japan
Title: Mechanical properties and characterization of CNT and graphene reinforced ceramics composites

Biography: Dr. Byung-Koog Jang is working at National Institute for Materials Science in Japan and is researching regarding on the development of CNTs reinforced nano composites (Al2O3/CNTs, ZrO2/CNTs, HAp/CNTs), thermal barrier coatings and porous ceramics. He has been mainly taking charge of processing, sintering by spark plasma sintering & reaction bonded sintering as well as mechanical evaluation of advanced nano ceramics & composites. He is also an expert about the evaluation of the thermal conductivity of bulk materials and coatings based on the laser flash method. He received Ph.D at the University of Tokyo, Japan, 1994.

Abstract: CNT(Carbon Nanotube) have attracted great interest because of their unique structural, electronic, physical, and thermal properties, such as high electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and elastic modulus. It has been reported that CNT are 100 times stronger and 6 times lighter than steel. Therefore, CNT are added to metal, polymer, or ceramics to improve mechanical and thermal resistance or electrical conduction. Among these, CNT addition into engineering ceramics is expected to offer good damage and wear resistance, exhibited by the lower friction and damage absorption characteristics of carbon material. The goal of the present study is to improve the damage and wear resistance of alumina ceramics by the addition of CNT, considering only the content of CNT in the composites. The load displacement curves were influenced by the CNT content in the composites. The hardness and toughness of Al2O3-CNT nanocomposites were also affected by CNT contents, which, in turn, influenced the wear characteristics of the composites. In addition, carbon nanotube (CNT) have emerged as one of the ideal reinforcement agents due to their exceptional mechanical properties and superior thermal and electrical properties. In this work, the effect of carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforcement and the transformation toughening mechanism on the fracture toughness of 3mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) has been investigated. Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs)-reinforced hydroxyapatite composites were analyzed in two directions of the applied pressure (perpendicular and parallel). Platelet-shaped pores were observed in the cross- section normal to the applied pressure, whereas elongated or buttonhole type pores around the agglomerated GNPs were found in the parallel cross-section.


K. Yu. Zershchikov
Сonstanta-2 LLC, Russia
Title: How disperse filler particles affect the physics and mechanics of polymer composites

Biography: Born 2 December, 1961 in Volgograd, Russia. In 1984, graduated from Volgograd Technical University as a mechanical engineer, started his carrier at a structural steel plant as a manager and was promoted to production supervisor. In 1989, started teaching at Volgograd Technical University, in 1993 defended the Candidate of Technical Sciences thesis titled ‘Residual stresses in metal-polymer composites’. Since 1993, heads the company Сonstanta-2 LLC that develops novel composites and fabricates polymer and composite seals.

Abstract: A method has been developed to calculate the filler interparticle spacing and the matrix to filler contact area taking into account the filler’s properties, namely the size and shape of particles and the volume fraction in the matrix. Assuming that the properties of polymer composites containing hard inelastic filler particles depend on the polymer’s behaviour in the interparticle spaces, the effect of the filler’s properties on some physical and mechanical composite parameters has been studied. The studies examined how the filler’s shape, size and quantity affect the strength, elongation at break, shrinkage and linear expansion coefficient. Experimental testing of the assumptions has shown good repeatability of the calculation results.


Rafael Popper
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd, Finland
Title: CASI-F applied to critical issue analysis and assessment of Li-ion battery technology solutions

Biography: Rafael Popper (PhD) is Principal Scientist in Foresight, Organizational Dynamics and Systemic Change at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, and Research Fellow at the Manchester Institute of Innovation Research of the University of Manchester. He is Director of Executive Education in Foresight and Horizon Scanning at the Alliance Manchester Business School, and Innovation Director and CEO of Futures Diamond Ltd (UK and Czech Republic). He has also worked at United Nations Industrial Development Organisation (UNIDO) and as consultant for the European Commission, World Bank and other international, governmental and business organisations in Europe, Latin America, Africa, Asia and Australia.

Abstract: We apply CASI-F (Common Framework for the Assessment and Management of Sustainable Innovation) to analyse critical issues that influence the uptake of nanotechnologies in battery technologies. Due to climate change as well as the growing capacity of new storage media for electric power, electric mobility represents a future vision for individual mobility on an environmentally-friendly basis. The lithium-ion battery is considered the key technology for future (electric) engine systems. However, lithium-ion battery technology could be considered to be at the peak of technical enhancement. A number of researchers are trying to shift away from conventional Li-ion battery technology and implement nanotechnology to other energy storage devices in order to make them more cost competitive and influence superior performance as compared to Li-ion batteries. A careful analysis and evaluation of the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches is therefore indispensable. Besides technological aspects, CASI-F includes wider market and ecosystem development considerations, i.e. economic, environmental, social, government and infrastructure systems. Since the product market is influenced by changing socio-technical system conditions at the niche, regime and landscape levels, we need to evaluate the development of broader issues, e.g. regulation and legislation, norms and standards as well as infrastructure and user acceptance. For example, one can expect that recyclability and sustainability will play an ever increasing role in electric mobility solutions. Aspects of all these areas play a huge role in market development.


Babita S
Annamalai University, India
Title: A novel lovastatin formulation for improving oral bioavailability

Biography: Ms.Sarangi is currently pursuing Ph.D at Annamalai University under the guidance of Dr.Guru Prasad Mohanta. She is a post graduate in M.Pharm from Dibrugarh University, Dibrugarh with Pharmaceutics as the core area of specialization. She is doing her research work on Nanoparticulate Drug Delivery System. Her research interest includes development and evaluation of Novel Drug Delivery System and Clinical Pharmacokinetics.

Abstract: Lovastatin, a highly lipophilic drug is associated with poor oral bioavailability belongs to the class of cholesterol lowering drugs. This work is an attempt to improve oral bioavailability of lovastatin through formulation as solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs). Lovastatin was encapsulated into SLNs prepared by pre-emulsion and probesonication method employing trimyristin as lipid carrier, poloxamer 407 as surfactant and soyalecithine as emulsifier. SLNs formulations were optimized using central composite design. The responses of the design were analyzed using design expert software 8.0.7.1 (state ease inc., usa) and evaluated for independent variables. Based upon software analysis the SLNs formulations were optimized. The particle size and zeta potential of optimized formulation were measured by dynamic light scattering technique and were found to be 348.8±35.5 nm and -18.6 mV respectively. The entrapment efficiency was found to be 84.06±0.15%. The shape and surface topography of lyophilized SLNs were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and found spherical in shape. The drug release study was performed using dialysis bag diffusion technique and cumulative drug release showed up to 72 % in 24 h. In vitro drug release studies confirmed the sustained release nature of the formulation. The optimized SLNs showed no physical changes at refrigerated and room temperature for 90 days. Results from this study suggest that SLN is a promising colloidal system which could significantly improve the bioavailability of lovastatin by improving the solubility.


Rafael Popper
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd, Business, Finland
Title: CASI-F applied to critical issue analysis and assessment of Li-ion battery technology solutions

Biography: Mika Naumanen (MSc Tech, MSc Econ) is a senior scientist in the Innovation and Knowledge Economy group of VTT. He has run VTT’s “business from technology” program and managed a portfolio of business development projects in the fields of Industrial Systems Management, Services and Built Environment, ICT and Electronics. These activities include monitoring and forecasting technology development paths as well as developing indicators and providing analysis of how these projects meet the national research and innovation policy objectives. Naumanen is a visiting scholar in Statistics Finland also.

Abstract: We apply CASI-F (Common Framework for the Assessment and Management of Sustainable Innovation) to analyse critical issues that influence the uptake of nanotechnologies in battery technologies. Due to climate change as well as the growing capacity of new storage media for electric power, electric mobility represents a future vision for individual mobility on an environmentally-friendly basis. The lithium-ion battery is considered the key technology for future (electric) engine systems. However, lithium-ion battery technology could be considered to be at the peak of technical enhancement. A number of researchers are trying to shift away from conventional Li-ion battery technology and implement nanotechnology to other energy storage devices in order to make them more cost competitive and influence superior performance as compared to Li-ion batteries. A careful analysis and evaluation of the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches is therefore indispensable. Besides technological aspects, CASI-F includes wider market and ecosystem development considerations, i.e. economic, environmental, social, government and infrastructure systems. Since the product market is influenced by changing socio-technical system conditions at the niche, regime and landscape levels, we need to evaluate the development of broader issues, e.g. regulation and legislation, norms and standards as well as infrastructure and user acceptance. For example, one can expect that recyclability and sustainability will play an ever increasing role in electric mobility solutions. Aspects of all these areas play a huge role in market development.


Jang-Ung Park
Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Republic of Korea
Title: Wearable electronic devices using graphene and its hybrid nanostructures

Biography: Jang-Ung Park achieved his Ph.D. from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) in 2009. After that, he went on to work as Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University. He is now an Associate Professor in School of Materials Science and Engineering at UNIST. His current research is focused on nanomaterials synthesis and wearable electronics.

Abstract: Recently, wearable electronics detecting the physiological change for the diagnosis of disease have attracted extensive interests globally. Among them, contact lens is one of the most attractive candidate for the continuous and wireless health monitoring. To realize these personal see-through, devices all device components are required to be transparent and stretchable in order to be integrated into the multiplexed sensor system including wearable soft contact lenses. However, the transparent and stretchable sensors integrated on the biomaterials are not yet been realized. In this talk, we presented an unconventional approach to form transparent, flexible and sensitive multiplexed sensors for diagnosing diabetes and glaucoma based on hybrid nanostructures using one-dimensional metal nanowires and two-dimensional graphene. Additionally, the entirely integrated sensors on the contact lens are designed to be R (resistance) L (inductance) C (capacitance) structure operating via radio frequency for wireless and real-time sensing. In this respect, power sources, associated circuitry, and interconnect electrodes are not required in this system. We further present real-time in-vivo glucose monitoring in rabbit and ex-vivo intraocular pressure sensing in bovine eyeballs wirelessly for applications in wearable electronics. The advance of these electronics using hybrid structures provides a route towards future electronics.


Bal Chandra Yadav
Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University, India
Title: Nanostructured metal oxide in polymer matrix for the detections of NO2 and Liquefied Petroleum Gases in open environment

Biography:

Abstract: Present work will include the research carried out on various nanostructured metal oxides such as ZnO, SnO2, TiO2 etc. and their composites with polymeric materials like PANI, PEG, PVA, polypyrrole etc. As special case I will discuss the preparation of ZnO thin film, polyaniline (PANI) and PANI-ZnO and their applications as NO2 gas sensor. Pt-doped SnO2 thin film based sensor was found to give maximum sensing response of about 183 towards low concentration of (20 ppm) of NO2 gas at the temperature of 90˚C with very fast response (~ 6 sec) and recovery (~ 13 sec) time. Amongst all the prepared sensor structures, the SnO2-ZnO (ZSO) sensor structure showed a high sensing response of about 1578 towards 20 ppm of NO2 gas at a lower operating temperature of 70˚C with an average response and recovery time of 3.91 min. and 6.91 min. respectively. These results as the film properties and sensing performances have been discussed in terms of a space-charge layer formed on the columnar grains. Also Liquefied Petroleum Gas sensing through above said investigated materials and other metallo polymers would be discussed.


Marikah David
Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya
Title: Novel Materials from Clay and Functionalized Clay Nanoparticles: Application in Remediation of Lead, Cadmium and Pentachlorophenol from Water

Biography:

Abstract: The importance of water purification especially removal of both organic and inorganic contaminants cannot be overemphasized, hence the need to develop water purification materials that are cheap, easily available and efficient. This would ensure realization of the Clean Water and Sanitation Sustainable Development Goal (SDGs). The current study involves isolation of clay nanoparticles (CNP) and functionalizing them with Cetylpyridinium Chloride (CPC) and Tetradecyltrimethylammonium Bromide (TTAB) to form C-CPC and C-TTAB respectively, so as to increase efficiency in removal of lead, cadmium and pentachlorophenol (PCP) through batch process. Clay was acquired locally, purified and CNP isolated by sedimentation and centrifugation. The CNP, C-CPC and C-TTAB were characterized using Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffractometry (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). HRTEM revealed a particle size of 12-15 nm for the three adsorbents. CNP had a lead removal efficiency of 88% at initial concentration of 80 ppm and 94% for Cadmium at initial concentration of 50 ppm, while C-CPC and C-TTAB had lead removal efficiencies of 98%. For cadmium removal, C-CPC and C-TTAB had 98.2% and 98.6% efficiencies respectively. In pentachlorophenol (PCP) adsorption, CNP, C-CPC and C-TTAB had removal efficiencies of 85.6%, 87.7% and 84.6% respectively. The findings suggest that isolation of CNP and consequent modification with the surfactants increases adsorption efficiency of clay against the water pollutants.


Abdur Rauf
University of Swabi Anbar, Pakistan
Title: Green Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Capped with Root Extracts of Rhus javanica and Their Biomedicinal Applications

Biography: Dr. Abdur Rauf has completed his PhD in 2015 from Institute of Chemical Sciences University of Peshawar, KPK, Pakistan. Currently, he is the Head Department of Chemistry University of Swabi Anbar, KPK, Pakistan. His field of specialization is Medicinal Chemistry; Pharmacology, Green synthesis of nanoparticles and molecular docking of bioactive compounds. He has published more than 130 scientific articles in reputed journals (>130 impact factor). He is serving as an editorial board member of 12 international journals. His articles got 632 citations as per Google scholar report. He has H-index 13 and i10 index 22 (Google scholar).

Abstract: Designing chemical products and coming up with new processes which either eliminate or reduce the production of environmental unfriendly substances is termed as Green Chemistry. This study deals with facile green synthesis of environmentally harmless silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) capped with root extracts of Rhus javanica. Synthesized silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs were characterized by using Uv-visible, Fourier transform (FT-IR) spectroscopy and AFM (atomic force microscope) analysis. Moreover, phytochemical analysis of R. javanica root extracts indicated the presence of various active classes of compounds such as tannins, reducing sugars, saponines, terpenoids, alkaloids, flavonoids, coumarins, betacyanins. These secondary metabolites could be the potential ligands in the green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs). In addition, synthesized Ag-NPs and the methanolic extracts of R. javanica were screened for their in-vitro and in-vivo antimicrobial, anti-nociceptive, muscle relaxant and sedative potentials. Ag-NPs showed excellent antimicrobial, anti-nociceptive, muscle relaxant and sedative potentials. It is concluded that the roots extracts of R. javanica is an excellent bioreducant for the rapid and green synthesis of Ag-NPs, which in turn showed various biomedicinal activities.


Nanomaterials Fabrication, Characterization and Tools

Session Introduction

Pietro Santagati
Amec Foster Wheeler, UK
Title: Computational Science and Nanotechnology in Strategic Energy Sectors

Biography: Dr. Pietro Santagati(Ph.D. in Mathematics for Technology), now is Computational Scientist, and Parallel Architecture Specialist, at Amec Foster Wheeler, Clean Energy Europe. He got his M.Sc. in Aerospace and Aeronautics Engineering at Polytechnic of Turin, M.Sc. in Applied Mathematics and Ph.D. in Mathematics for Technology at University of Catania. He has been working in different fields of applied engineering in particular, transport process in nano- and micro-structred materials and reliability analysis in nano-electronics. Currently he is involved in projects on computational applications of modern energy production systems.

Abstract: Nanotechnology and modern Computational Science play a key role in the energy sector. In the last decades energy demand has risen dramatically. New material, in terms of efficiency and reliability, have been studied and improved. Industry has an important role, not only in prototyping new devices, but also making their development and introduction in the market, on large scale, in sustainably way possible. This presentation focuses on the analysis of the impact of Nanotechnology in strategic energy sectors: nuclear, solar, storage. We will give also some results about recent studies, by mathematical and numerical modeling, of plasmonics technology.


Brent A Wacaser
Purdue University, USA
Title: The growth and characterization of Si and Ge nanowires grown from reactive metal catalysts

Biography:

Abstract: We discuss the benefits of using metals other than Au to catalyze the growth of Si and Ge nanowires, emphasizing the opportunities that these non-conventional materials provide for tailoring electronic and structural nanowire properties. However, since these metals are more reactive than Au, their use creates constraints on wire growth conditions as well as difficulties in post-growth characterization. These issues are illustrated for Si and Si/Ge nanowires grown from Al, Cu and AuAl starting materials. The vacuum requirements for the deposition of the reactive metals are discussed as well as the effect of atmospheric exposure on the structure of wires observed post-growth with electron microscopy.


Brent A Wacaser
Purdue University, USA
Title: Nanoscale chemical templating of Si nanowires seeded with Al

Biography:

Abstract: We describe a new approach for achieving controlled spatial placement of VLS-grown nanowires that uses an oxygen-reactive seed material and an oxygen-containing mask. Oxygen-reactive seed materials are of great interest for electronic applications, yet they cannot be patterned using the approaches developed for noble metal seed materials such as Au. This new process, nanoscale chemical templating, takes advantage of the reactivity of the blanket seed layer by depositing it over a patterned oxide that reacts with the seed material to prevent nanowire growth in undesired locations. Here we demonstrate this technique using Al as the seed material and SiO2 as the mask, and we propose that this methodology will be applicable to other reactive metals that are of interest for nanowire growth. The method has other advantages over conventional patterning approaches for certain applications including reducing patterning steps, flexibility in lithographic techniques, and high growth yields. We demonstrate its application with standard and microsphere lithography. We show a high growth yield and fidelity, with no NWs between openings and a majority of openings occupied by a single vertical nanowire, and discuss the dependence of yield on parameters.


Hammad Alotaibi
Australia
Title: Atomistic patch simulations for di↵usion equation in 3D

Biography:

Abstract: Recently the development of multiscale methods is one of the most fertile research areas in mathematics, physics, engineering and computer science. The computational cost is overwhelming when we predict the behaviour of the dynamics a system for macroscopic space time scales when only the microscopic model is available. It can be impossible to simulate the system over the whole domain. Patch simulation promises a great saving in computation. The main idea of this method is to use locally averaged properties over short space time scales to advance and predict long space time scale dynamics. We assume the patch simulation is periodic. Our aim is to explore the macroscopic properties of a system through atomistic simulations in small periodic patches. The computation will be implemented only on the periodic patch, while over most of the domain we interpolate. We divide the periodic patch into three regions. The core of the patch is surrounded by the left and right action regions. We develop appropriate control terms to the left and right action regions in order to make accurate macroscale predictions.


Ashwani Sharma
M.D.U. Rohtak, India
Title: Effect of doping on particle size of CuO

Biography:

Abstract: Nano materials have wide range of applications due to their interesting size-dependent chemical and physical properties compared to particles of size in the range of micrometer. Metal oxide nanoparticles are very usefull in field of sensing, optoelectronics, catalysis and solar cells due to their unique physical and chemical properties differing from bulk. copper oxide nanomaterials have attracted more attention due to its unique properties. . Cu2O (Cuprous oxide) and CuO (Cupric Oxide) are two important oxide compounds of copper. Cuprous oxide is p-type direct band gap semiconductor with band gap of 2 eV and Cupric oxide has a monoclinic structure and presents p-type semiconductor behavior with a Indirect band gap of 1.21–1.51 eV. They have lower surface potential barrier than that of metals, which affects electron field emission properties. (1-7)Strontium Oxide is a highly insoluble thermally stable source suitable for glass, optic and ceramic applications. Strontium oxide is a strongly basic, colorless oxide that forms elemental strontium when heated with aluminum in a vacuum. Here an attempt is made to synthesis (Srx Cu1-xO) nanoparticles by sol–gel method. Five samples were prepared by changing concentration of strontium and their XRD is studied comparatively We see that as we increase the concentration of strontium , the size of nanoparticles increase which is obvious as radius of strontium atom are bigger then copper atom.


Mohammad Shiva
Birjand University, Iran
Title: Introduction of Mining Materials having Capabilities for Nanotechnology, part one : Materials

Biography:

Abstract: This paper covers the introduction of the materials which are valuable to be extracted and processed in nanotechnology. There are dozen million tones of mining materials which should be considered as the sources, which their productions are worthy to be produced in the form of Nanotechnology productions. In this part of the paper, part one, the materials are introduced . One of the most important material is the Lithium element. The lithium element as the lightest element, has a widespread using in many industries such as battery industries, electrical vehicles, aluminum alloys, and aerial navigation industries. The lithium element is a very useful element which is valuable to be extracted and being used in nanotechnology products. The main source of lithium element is the bentonite mineral. A huge amounts of this mineral are present in Middle east Countries such as Iran, United Arab Emirates, Turkey, Oman and some others. The economic minerals which comprise the lithium element are Montmorillonite, Bidelite, Natrolite and Hectorite. Among these minerals, Hectorite mineral possesses the greatest amount of lithium and magnesium element in its composition.


Muhammad Mumtaz
International Islamic University, Pakistan
Title: MnFe2O4 Nanoparticles Addition Effects on Temperature and Frequency Dependent Dielectric Properties of Cu0.5Tl0.5Ba2Ca2Cu3O10-δ Superconductor

Biography: Muhammad Mumtaz, is an Assistant Professor (TTS) and Faculty of Basic and Applied Sciences (FBAS) at International Islamic University Islamabad, Pakistan

Abstract: Manganese ferrite (MnFe2O4) nanoparticles and Cu0.5Tl0.5Ba2Ca2Cu3O10-δ (CuTl-1223) superconductor were synthesized separately by sol-gel and two steps solid-state reaction method, respectively. Different concentrations of MnFe2O4 nanoparticles were added in CuTl-1223 matrix to get (MnFe2O4)x/CuTl-1223; x = 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 wt. % nanoparticles-superconductor composites. X-ray diffraction was used to find the crystal structure of (MnFe2O4)x/CuTl-1223 nanoparticles-superconductor composites. Unchanged crystal structure of host CuTl-1223 phase (i.e. Tetragonal) after addition of MnFe2O4 nanoparticles confirmed that these nanoparticles were settled at the grain-boundaries. Superconducting properties were over all suppressed after inclusion of MnFe2O4 nanoparticles in CuTl-1223 superconductor due to enhanced scattering cross-section of carriers across these magnetic nanoparticles at the grain-boundaries. Various dielectric properties of (MnFe2O4)x/CuTl-1223 nanoparticles-superconductor composites were investigated by varying test frequencies from 20 Hz to 200 M Hz and operating temperature from 78 K to 303 K. It was found that the values of dielectric parameters were found maximum at lower frequencies, which started to decrease with the increase in frequency. So the dielectric properties of CuTl-1223 superconducting phase can be tuned by varying the contents of MnFe2O4 nanoparticles, test frequencies and operating temperatures.


Nanoscale Electronics

Session Introduction

Hugh G. Manning
CRANN Institute, Ireland
Title: Non-Polar Resistive Switching of Core-Shell Nanowires

Biography: Mr. Hugh Manning B.A (mod), is a final year chemistry PhD candidate in Prof. John J. Boland’s nanowire research group which operates in the Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices; one of the largest research institutes in Trinity College Dublin and Ireland's leading nanoscience institute. Research interests include connectivity at a nano and macro scale, characterization of nanowires and nanowire networks, for use as transparent conductors, resistive switching memories, reservoir computing and neuromorphic applications. He is also an educator for Physics at Trinity Walton Club, a not-for-profit STEM Education program.

Abstract: Nanowire networks are of immense technological interest due to their properties of high transparency, high porosity, flexibility, ease of fabrication, and low cost. Engineering materials with emergent properties requires designing and characterising nanowire systems with desirable properties. One of these properties is the ability to undergo resistive switching, a transition from a high resistance state to a low resistance state. We report on the unique types of behaviours that emerge from combining Ag nanowires (AgNWs) with TiO2 in the form of solvothermal synthesised Ag core TiO2 shell nanowires. The presence of both bias dependent bipolar resistive switching (BRS) and bias independent unipolar resistive switching (URS) is termed nonpolar switching.1 Nonpolar operation has been demonstrated separately in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) and transition metal oxide (TMO) NW devices, however to date, the demonstration of nonpolar operation in a single NW has not yet been reported.2 Both BRS and URS is demonstrated for the first time in Ag/TiO2 core-shell nanowires. The switching mode could be chosen by adjusting the compliance current (ICC) and/or the amount of charge flown through the nanoscale junction. Nonpolar systems such as this, which evolve behaviours over time have possible applications as neuromorphic elements. ON/OFF ratios of 105 and 107 were obtained for BRS and URS modes respectively. In the bipolar regime, devices were cycled over 100 times, by setting the ICC ON state retention could be controlled up to 103 s. In unipolar mode, retention times > 106 s were recorded.


Imtiaz Madni
University of Western Australia, Australia
Title: Controlled Synthesis of Photodetector Nanowires of Bismuth Selenide

Biography: Imtiaz Madni is an early carrier researcher at The University of Western Australia, where he is working on epitaxial growth and characterization of semiconducting materials. His specialties are in exploring new and innovative materials for applications in future generation electronics. Imtiaz is working on revolutionary Quantum confined, low-dimensional materials to develop infrared detecting devices and topologically protected super-highways for electronics. He is currently working as a doctoral scholar at University of Western Australia. Before taking this position in Australia, he was working as a post-graduate researcher at Chinese Academy of Sciences in China.

Abstract: The unique physical and chemical properties of 2D materials have made a significant impact on research and development of modern electronics, spintronics, photonics, and energy technology. Recently, the layered V-VI binary compounds Bi2Se3, Bi2Te3, Sb2Te3 and their ternary compounds were discovered as topological insulators, which are considered as a new class of materials revealing new phases of quantum matter, possessing conducting surface states while showing bulk insulating properties. Ultrathin nanosheets of Bi2Se3 have been successfully employed for the photocurrent studies. Motivated by these advantages, we investigated the vapor-solid growth of nanowires of Bi2Se3 on Si substrate. Here we demonstrate the photoresponse of Bi2Se3 nanowires grown by a facile and high-yield vapor deposition method with well-aligned orientation, and controlled length. Significant photocurrent response was observed when nanowires were illuminated with visible light lamp. The photocurrent dynamics of the nanowires were characterized for cyclic exposure of visible light to study the stability and repeatability of the photocurrent. The crystalline quality and surface morphology of the as grown Bi2Se3 nanowires were investigated by using XRD, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). High photoresponsivity was observed in Bi2Se3 nanowires, which is 4-5 orders of magnitude higher than the photoresponse of nanoplates of Bi2Se3. The efficient generation-recombination mechanism in nanowires can be attributed to quantum confinement effects, and larger aspect ratio.


Ammar Nayfeh
Masdar Institute of Science and Technology Abu Dhabi, UAE
Title: 3-nm-Thick ZnO Nanoislands Charge Trapping Layer for Memory Devices Grown by Single ALD Step

Biography: Ammar Nayfeh received his PhD degree in electrical engineering in 2006 from Stanford University. After his PhD, he joined Advanced Micro Devices as a researcher working in collaboration with IBM. Following that, he then spent a year as a consultant with PDF solutions and later joined a siliconvalley start-up, Innovative Silicon (ISi) in 2008. In addition, he was a part time professor at San Jose State University. In June 2010, he joined MIT as a visiting scholar and became a faculty member at the Masdar Institute of Science and Technology in Abu Dhabi, UAE. At Masdar, he is director of the Nano Electronics and Photonics Laboratory where his primary research interests include, novel PV devices, Low-Power Nano-Electronics, High-Performance Nano-Electronics, Nano-Photonics, and Nano-Memory Technologies. Professor Nayfeh is currently an associate professor in the Department Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) at the Masdar Institute of Science and Technology. Professor Ammar Nayfeh has authored or co-authored over 80 publications, and holds three patents. He is a member of IEEE, MRS and Stanford Alumni Association. He has received the Material Research Society Graduate Student Award, the Robert C. Maclinche Scholarship at UIUC, and Stanford Graduate Fellowship.

Abstract: Low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures are of great interest in high performance electronic and photonic devices. However, in order to preserve the continuous scaling of current memory devices, the charge-trapping capability of the charge-trapping layer has to be further improved [1-4]. In addition, ZnO is considered to be a multifunctional material due to its unique properties with potential in various applications. In this work, 3-nm ZnO nanoislands are deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) and the electronic and structural properties are characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), UV-Vis-NIR Spectrophotometer and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. The results show that the nanostructures show quantum confinement effects in 1D where the bandgap is increased and the electron affinity is reduced. Moreover, Metal-Oxide- Semiconductor Capacitor (MOSCAP) charge trapping memory devices with ZnO nanoislands charge storage layer are fabricated by a single ALD step and their performances are analyzed. The devices showed a large memory window at low operating voltages with excellent retention and endurance characteristics due to the additional oxygen vacancies in the nanoislands and the deep barrier for the trapped holes due to the reduction in ZnO electron affinity. The results show that the ZnO nanoislands are promising in future low power memory applications.


Ali Ben Ahmed
University of Sfax, Tunisia
Title: Molecular structure, spectroscopic characterization and Non Linear Optical properties of New Non centro-symmetric compound: A DFT approach.

Biography:

Abstract: Crystalline salts of optically active amino acids represent an important class of so-called semi-organic crystals, which can combine the positive features of both, organic and inorganic crystals. In particular, the salts of L-histidine (L-His) display high Non Linear Optical (NLO) properties due to the presence of imidazole and amino-carboxylate groups in histidine molecule. The NLO properties depend on different parameters: chemical composition, symmetry, conformation and charge state of cation, hydrogen bonds, etc. In order to study the effect of these parameters we have prepared a series of NLO based histidine crystals with various inorganic acids: L-His+HBr + H2O [1], L-His + HCl + H2O [2], L-His+ C2H2O4 [3] and L-His+ (H3PO4, H2PO4) [4]. The crystals structures where determined by X-Ray Diffraction. All compounds exhibits acentric unit cell. In order to investigate microscopic non-linear optical (NLO) behaviour we have carried out a theoretical study of the examined complex, the electric dipole µ, the polarizability α and the first hyperpolarizability β were computed using DFT//B3LYP/6-31G (d) method. The calculation shows that all salts of L-histidine exhibits non-zero β value revealing microscopic second order NLO behavior: (L-His+ C2H2O4 [β = 10.2308 10-31 esu]; L-His+HBr+H2O [β = 16.33 10-31 esu]; L-His+ (H3PO4, H2PO4) [β = 24.99 10-31 esu] and L-His.HCl.H2O [β = 31.97 10-31 esu]). Due to the acentric unit cell and the high hyperpolarizability, all synthesis compounds could be promising materials for NLO applications.


Carlos Torres-Torres
Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico
Title: Cooperative magneto-optic interactions for encrypting information in hierarchical nanostructures

Biography: Carlos Torres-Torres has a PhD in Optics obtained in the Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education at Ensenada, Mexico. His main researches are about Nonlinear optics exhibited by nanostructures. He has been awarded by the Materials Research Society in United States of America during 2013 regarding his studies about low-dimensional materials. He has been awarded as the best reviewer in 2015 by the Journal of Optics and Laser Technology Elsevier; and also he has been awarded as an outstanding reviewer of the Journal of Physics: Applied Physics by the Institute of Physics of United Kingdom.

Abstract: The third-order nonlinear optical properties exhibited by anisotropic nanostructured materials are strongly sensitive to morphology and polarization of light. In this direction, the vectorial behavior of optical beams can be a powerful tool for exploring particular characteristics in nanomaterials. Instrumentation of all-optical signals in ultrafast nanosystems can be carried out by recording the nonlinear optical transmittance controlled by multi-wave mixing experiments. However, here is described, how the surrounding media where the nanoparticles are immersed can be able to modulate important parameters with influence on the optical transmittance of nanophotonic signals. Significant magnetic contributions that may be responsible for a modification in the resonance or in the scattering of light can be promoted by hybrid and hierarchical nanoparticles. In this research are discussed the implications of collective nonlinear magneto-optic effects in low-dimensional materials. Quantum and cryptology applications based on superposition and multiplexing signals can be contemplated.


Posters

Session Introduction

Hugh G Manning
2CRANN Institute, Ireland
Title: Selective Area Spray Deposition of Nanomaterials

Biography: Hugh Manning B.A (mod), is a final year chemistry PhD candidate in Prof. John J. Boland’s nanowire research group which operates in the Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices; one of the largest research institutes in Trinity College Dublin and Ireland's leading nanoscience institute. Research interests include connectivity at a nano and macro scale, characterization of nanowires and nanowire networks, for use as transparent conductors, resistive switching memories, reservoir computing and neuromorphic applications. He is also an educator for Physics at Trinity Walton Club, a not-for-profit STEM Education program.

Abstract: Realizing devices which include a combination of nano and macro elements demands the controlled placement of nanomaterial features on the surface of solid and flexible substrates. This has traditionally been achieved either by in-situ growth, or post-fabrication patterning and deposition. In-situ growth being impossible for solution synthesized nanomaterials and ordinarily requiring high temperatures which are not compatible with soft substrates. Solution-based deposition techniques are typically simple, low-cost and relatively easy to scale up. We describe a technique to selectively deposit areas of nanomaterials through electron-beam lithography and solution-based spray deposition. Surface energy driven effects between the nanomaterial and substrate cause an observed local gathering or sticking of nanomaterials on the polymer resist layer depending on the nanomaterial surface coating. This is confirmed by AFM manipulation of individual Cu and Ag NWs on SiO2 and polymer surfaces. As well as optical tracking of nanowires adhering to the surface during dropcasting. The gathering effect makes this method invaluable when patterning low-yield or expensive nanomaterials. This top-down direct write lithographic process is utilized for the placement of Ag and Cu isolated nanowire networks (FIG 1.) as well as the creation of unique nano to macroscopic size structures composed of ZnO and Ag nanoparticles. Moreover, it is a step towards the creation and integration of elements comprising of nanoparticles and isolated nanowire networks in macroscale systems.


Jin-Young Lee
Korea University, Korea
Title: Properties of Low-Carbon High Strength Concrete Beams using blast furnace slag

Biography: Jin-Young Lee is a PhD candidate in the School of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering at Korea University. His research interests include high-performance concrete, fiber-reinforced polymer, and impact and blast resistance of concrete structure members.

Abstract: In recent years, the development of low carbon high strength concrete containing high volume mineral admixtures. Replacing Portland cement with mineral admixtures such as fly ash, silica fume and blast furnace slag has been a widely adopted strategy due to their pozzolanic reactivity and latent hydraulic activity. Thus, for the low-carbon high strength concrete incorporating high volume of mineral admixtures exhibit fast and enhancement of early age strength need to be steam-cured with heat. According to the previous research, in the case of 0.275 W/B, the blast furnace slag replacement ratios of 60% were most effective in improving the compressive strength of stream curing, both early and during long-term aging. But high strength concrete is intrinsically brittle, exhibiting low fracture energy. The use of discontinuous steel fibers is expected to be most efficient in improving the flexural performance of concrete under static loads assuming identical volume fraction of added fibers. And ACI Subcommittee 318-F recommended the use of a minimum fiber volume fraction of 0.75% for replacing minimum shear reinforcement through the use of steel fibers. Thus, the use of hooked-end steel fibers with the aspect ratio of 65 was more effective in improving the flexural strength and compressive strength. And the compressive strength over 70MPa in the 28 days both low carbon high strength concrete (HSC) with and without hooked steel fibers (HSFRC). In the ACI Subcommittee 319-F recommended and many researchers have shown that the use of steel fibers in beams without shear reinforcement can enhance shear resistance and promote flexural failure a ductility. For the evaluation of shear characteristics of Low-carbon HSC and HSFRC which mixtures were developed in a previous study. The series of five full-scale high strength reinforced concrete (HSC) beams were tested to evaluate the effects of steel fibers in shear capacity. And the two size types of beams will fabricate and evaluate the effect of size effect in this study. Furthermore, from this series of test, examined the effect of fibers on shear resistance, failure mechanism, ductility, and cracking that specimen made of low carbon HSC or HSFRC containing by high volume blast furnace slag.


Sae-Wan Kim
Kyungpook National University, South Korea
Title: Hybrid bi-stable memory device based on CdSe/ZnS quantum dots embedded in aluminum oxide nano-cluster

Biography: Sae-Wan Kim, received the B. S, M. S degrees in the School of Electronics Engineering, College of IT Engineering from Kyungpook National University, Daegu, South Korea in 2012 and 2015 respectively. He is currently working toward the PhD degree in Prof. Shinwon Kang’s group at Kyungpook National University. His current research is focused on the study of nanomaterials and memory device.

Abstract: The proposed memory device based on CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) was fabricated by using spin coating. The quantum confinement effect observed in QDs provide the hysteresis characteristics in I-V curve [1]. Especially, the charge storage layer (CSL) of fabricated memory device was formed using QDs and aluminum oxide nano-cluster. The nano-cluster can sustain the trapped charge at the core of QDs for a longer time compared to only QDs used memory device. Also, to improve the retention time characteristics and stability, PEDOT:PSS and ZnO layer was also formed. The PEDOT:PSS layer increase the hole injection from ITO to core of QDs and ZnO layer protect the lower QDs layer. The schematic diagram of fabricated memory device was shown in figure 1, the band diagram was shown in figure 2. The hole was injected from ITO to QDs by tunneling with the proper positive voltage, by applying proper negative voltage, the trapped charge was extracted from QDs to ITO, which provide the hysteresis in I-V curve. Compared to QDs only used memory device, the nano-cluster used memory device have the higher on/off ratio and longer retention time.


David Mutegi Marikah
Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya
Title: Novel Materials from Clay and Functionalized Clay Nanoparticles: Application in Remediation of Lead, Cadmium and Pentachlorophenol from Water

Biography:

Abstract: Abstract— The importance of water purification especially removal of both organic and inorganic contaminants cannot be overemphasized, hence the need to develop water purification materials that are cheap, easily available and efficient. This would ensure realization of the Clean Water and Sanitation Sustainable Development Goal (SDGs). The current study involves isolation of clay nanoparticles (CNP) and functionalizing them with Cetylpyridinium Chloride (CPC) and Tetradecyltrimethylammonium Bromide (TTAB) to form C-CPC and C-TTAB respectively, so as to increase efficiency in removal of lead, cadmium and pentachlorophenol (PCP) through batch process. Clay was acquired locally, purified and CNP isolated by sedimentation and centrifugation. The CNP, C-CPC and C-TTAB were characterized using Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffractometry (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). HRTEM revealed a particle size of 12-15 nm for the three adsorbents. CNP had a lead removal efficiency of 88% at initial concentration of 80 ppm and 94% for Cadmium at initial concentration of 50 ppm, while C-CPC and C-TTAB had lead removal efficiencies of 98%. For cadmium removal, C-CPC and C-TTAB had 98.2% and 98.6% efficiencies respectively. In pentachlorophenol (PCP) adsorption, CNP, C-CPC and C-TTAB had removal efficiencies of 85.6%, 87.7% and 84.6% respectively. The findings suggest that isolation of CNP and consequent modification with the surfactants increases adsorption efficiency of clay against the water pollutants.


Jun-Ho Jang
Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Korea
Title: Evaluation of Cu-coated graphite compacts prepared by pulsed current activated sintering process

Biography: Mr. Jun-Ho Jang is a Researcher at Korea Institute of Industrial Technology(KITECH), Korea

Abstract: Cu-coated graphite powder for weight reduction and a high thermal conductivity was fabricated using a chemical reaction process. First, 4 g of graphite powders, which was treated using an activation and wetting process, was added to an aqueous solution of copper (Cu) sulfate; also, zinc (Zn) powders (such as 35, 40, 45, and 50 wt.%) was added as a transposition solvent to the aqueous solution and stirred for 1 hr for a transposition reaction. After the addition of the fabricated powders mixture to a 75 wt.% DI water: 10 wt.% H3PO4 : 10 wt.% H2SO4 : 5 wt.% mixture, tartaric acid was added to the aqueous solution to produce a passivating oxide film, followed by a drying for 24 hrs. The particle size of the fabricated powder, which is coarser than the initial graphite powder, is approximately 3 µm to 4 µm, and the low-intensity oxide peak of the XRD pattern of the fabricated powders is due to the low Zn powder content. With the use of the Cu-coated graphite powder, Cu-coated graphite sintered bodies were fabricated using a pulse current activated sintering (PCAS) process. The Cu-graphite sintered bodies were sintered with heating rate of 60, 100 and 150 o C/min, respectively. The Cu-coated graphite powders and compacts were evaluated using FE-SEM, EDS, XRD, a particle analysis, and the Archimedes method.


Hyma Ponnaganti
St Pauls College of Pharmacy, India
Title: Formulation and evaluation of niosomes of diclofenac sodium

Biography:

Abstract: The present research article is aimed at formulation of niosomes of dilcofenac sodium .Niosomes are sphere shaped vesicles containing one or more phospholipid bilayer, they are usually used to maintain drugs for a prolonged period of time and increase the bioavailability of the drug. The drug diclofenac has plasma half life of 2-3 hrs which requires frequent dosing of the drug. Niosomes were produced by thin film hydration technique using cholesterol, span 80. The drug excipient studies were done by FTIR and the surface morphology was analysed by SEM studies. The in vitro diffusion studies has shown the prolonged release of the drug confirming the sustained effect of niosomes.


HamedAlshammari
Ha'il University, Saudi Arabia
Title: Catalytic activity of bimetallic AuPd alloys supported MgO and MnO2 nanostructures and their role in selective aerobic oxidation of alcohols

Biography:

Abstract: The use of metal oxides as supports for gold and palladium (Au-Pd) nanoalloys constitutes new horizons to improve new active catalysts in very important reactions. From the literatures, Pd-based bimetallic nanostructures have great properties and active catalytic performance. In this study, nanostructures of Magnesium oxide (MgO) and nano Manganese dioxide (MnO₂) were synthesised and utilized as supports for Au-Pd nanoparticles catalysts. Gold and palladium were deposited on these supports using sol-immobilisation method. The MgO and MnO2 supported Au-Pd catalysts were evaluated for the oxidation of benzyl alcohol, aliphatic, aromatic alcohols and 1-octanol, respectively. This catalyst was found to be selective, active and reusable than the corresponding monometallic Au and Pd catalysts. The outcomes of this work shed light on the selective aerobic oxidation of alcohols using bimetallic Au-Pd nanoalloys and pave the way to a complete investigation of more basic metal oxides for various aliphatic alcohols.


Nanotechnology Congress 2017 | by: Scientific Future Group